Having a hard time seeing the benefits of living "in the country" anymore.

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Beeman, Sep 8, 2006.

  1. Beeman

    Beeman Well-Known Member

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    I don't seem to see many if any advantages to living out in the country anymore. I've lived on acreage in small town rural areas for over 20 years. There is no longer clean air as good jobs and economic development have taken that away. There is no peace and quiet for all of the neighbors, between their outdoor arguments, barking dogs, speeding junk cars, and fighting roosters it's not exactly quiet. The good economy has created large housing developments and shopping malss all along anything greater than a gravel road. Taxes keep going up as services attempt to keep up but they are extremely behind and it will cost 2 fortunes for them to catch up, besides all of the crooked politics of the good old boys. The schools were always happy not to be last in the nation but they're headed more that way every day and costing us more and more as they are behind on everything from buildings on down as they play catch up with the relocation boom. The crime and drug problem is getting real bad too and you have to lock everything up or it's gone.
     
  2. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

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    Wow Beeman, that sounds pretty rough. I noticed E. Tenn in your profile and am assuming this has to do with the whole smokey mountain region?
     

  3. Beeman

    Beeman Well-Known Member

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    This area has it's problems but I have relatives in other places in the country facing similar problems. The ironic thing is a place with a bad economy yet a high cost of living actually offers the best living conditions but of course it's hard to survive there.
     
  4. ET1 SS

    ET1 SS zone 5 - riverfrontage Supporter

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    If you had a poor economy then how do you also have a high cost of living?
     
  5. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    No matter where you go or where you live, things WILL change! Maybe for the better and maybe for the worse, but they will change.

    Urban sprawl is starting to surround us now. But, I saw it coming. It's life. :shrug:
     
  6. Cornhusker

    Cornhusker Unapologetically me Supporter

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    Sounds to me like you aren't far enough out in the country.
    Nothing I hate worse than a thief.
    There was a family who lived a few miles from us, and they stole everything that wasn't nailed down. Their kid would drive through wheat fields and run over mailboxes.
    They soon felt very unwelcome and decided to move on.
    Where there's very few people, it's hard to hide bad behavior.
     
  7. ponyboy123

    ponyboy123 Well-Known Member

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    I feel for ya Beeman, but round here the crickets r the loudest sound I hear. No neighbours for couple miles around. I don't own a key for my house or my truck, and things I do have keys for I leave em in it so I don't lose em. Property taxes here r reasonable but I really don't expect much for em. I take care of snow removal and most road repair myself. You find the right country u might just reconsider those thoughts.

    Pony
     
  8. Bink

    Bink Well-Known Member

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    My guess is the locality is raising taxes past seeing over in an attempt to avoid bankruptcy.

    As jobs leave, states are hurting for revenue. They can raise taxes in an effort to keep the structure running. It doesn't mean that the citizens have the money to pay the taxes, but it's worth a try.
     
  9. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hubby was talking about how much I enjoy living in the country just today. We BOTH enjoy it, but I was all excited about the hummingbirds at the feeder on the porch and the fact that my huge blue morninglories were so pretty!

    Later this afternoon we were sitting in our rockers on the front porch enjoying the hummingbird show, listening to the sounds of bugs and birds (no traffic sounds, no people, no sign of other humans at all) and just plain old relaxing.

    This evening we were at the pond throwing in sticks for the dogs, then we went up to muddle about the garden and water the duck and chickens. We are in the process of clearing out all the raised beds so I've been gathering grubs for my feathered friends.

    Last night we stood outside and watched the big orange full moon come up and before bed we stepped out on the porch to enjoy the coolness and the promise of Autumn that is in the air.

    These are just a few of the reasons we live out in the country. We're only eight miles out of town, but we bought property that is mostly flood plain so we have no close neighbors and never will. Our road has almost no traffic and the house is a half mile off that road. When we moved from Dallas/Ft. Worth we chose the most isolated spot we could find and still be close enough for hubby to commute. A lot of people thought we were nuts for buying flood plain property, but it offered exactly what we wanted...solitude and the assurance that it would always be that way.
     
  10. Beltane

    Beltane Enjoying Four Seasons

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    I'm very sorry things seem so bad for you right now...I hear ya. But...no one ever told us it would be easy, right? I just continue to plug along...and sometimes you end up finding the silver lining that makes it all worth while. :)
     
  11. mtman

    mtman Well-Known Member

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    we love where we live down this dirt road no industry and only a few neibors we get together every weekend couldnt be better
     
  12. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    beeman- you don't live in the country any more.

    we're still okay down in this part. our bad reputation keeps the riff-raff out. :)
     
  13. Selena

    Selena proud to be pro-choice

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    Floodplains are no reason to NOT build in my area and last Monday they had anywhere from 5-10 inches of rain in 2 hours and had to rescue people in the middle of the city! Limestone foundations caved in, a lot of folks lost 1/2 their wordly possessions. All because the local pols allowed building in a floodplain. And guess what, it will cost $50 MILLION to "fix" the problem. Down the road from me they are allowing a developer to funnel water into a creek. Problem is at times, this small creek cannot handle the water and the neighbors house gets surrounded and if not a "bad" flood, the water only gets to 4th stair from the 1st floor. Bad flood it ends up 3 feet deep on the first floor (you can see the water mark on the walls).
    If I hear of any of these idiots heading your way, I'll send you a PM!

     
  14. roughingit

    roughingit knitwit

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    Last five places I've lived have had that problem. Most of the poor in those areas are on welfare.
     
  15. pickapeppa

    pickapeppa Well-Known Member

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    We're living on a 1/2 mile square block with thirty other houses. Everyone has about an acre of land per house.

    Once in a while, we hear the neighbors. Sometimes they bring out their four wheelers or crotch rockets and make noise. But it's infrequent enough to enjoy the quiet. There's also a nearby farmer who flies planes with his buddies all summer long. It seem with the price of gas, that's slowed quite a bit this year.

    All in all, we have more quiet than noise. We're hoping development slows. Otherwise, in a couple of years, it's going to get really noisy with all the big subdivisions coming in on our road.
     
  16. patarini

    patarini Well-Known Member

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    Wow -- frogs were driving me nuts earlier, but the pond dried up. Heard and saw a chopper other day, and back oh 3-4 weeks heard a truck going up the hill, aint seen a neighbor in couple months, doors unlocked keys in cars,l living cheep still!
     
  17. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    It's fairly remote here because it's removed from the high population centers.
    Nevertheless, I sure notice development over the last 10 years. As soon as a road develops, pop go the houses. Down the road was nothing but pasture. The new owner now divided it and a big new log house is going up on my quiet biking road. :grump:
    Anyone that doesn't beleieve overpopulation is partially the cause of sprawl should think again. People will live somewhere, and their kids want more than what the parents had. It will continue to get worse.
     
  18. Shepherd

    Shepherd Well-Known Member

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    Beeman, you definitely don't live out in the country anymore - not NEAR far enough.

    Any direction we look, we can see nothing but our land. It's a rare event to hear anything but once in a great while when the wind's just right, we might hear the neighbor's children out playing. Our trees filter the air we breathe. We love it.
     
  19. Peacock

    Peacock writing some wrongs Supporter

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    East TN is not a great place. We have a good friend that lives down there, in Blaine near Knoxville. He's done pretty well for himself, found a job teaching -- I'm not sure exactly what, I think he's teaching construction/carpentry stuff to hispanic folks because he's fluent in Spanish (3rd generation immigrant from Ecuador). But it took him a good 10 years (yikes! has it been that long?) of struggling for him to find his niche.

    We visited him about 8 years ago; he's got a nice house he built himself WAY out in the sticks. But on the way we passed all sorts of makeshift dwellings, including a house built of cinder blocks stacked around a trailer, and a house that looked abandoned with broken windows except it had barefoot kids playing in the yard. Clearly there is some serious poverty in those parts. Our friend has suffered through a lot of theft - he's had tools, weapons, and other stuff stolen. It's been very discouraging for him. Worse, he's trying to raise a young son down there too.

    Living in the country is always hard unless your acreage can either support you completely or provide a means of income; living out just for distance's sake is nearly always a guarantee of poverty. And cheap land is generally cheap for a reason.

    Come to SW Ohio. ;)
     
  20. Kenneth in NC

    Kenneth in NC Well-Known Member

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    Beeman the good thing is with all that development you can sell your property and realize a profit. :)

    Kenneth