Homesteading Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,872 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've seen this point pop up in a few different threads...and from talking with other rabbit folk. They say..wet hands are no fun.

Why are you getting wet hands????

Haven't folks heard of rubber gloves? or even medical gloves?

Stick them under or over whatever gloves you have to keep your hands warm, and the rubber gloves will keep your hands dry.

for me I put on a thin pair of those one size fits all gloves - the knit things you buy in dollar stores. (or sometimes two depending on the weather) and then put the rubber or surgical gloves over top. I do my water and cleaning first. THEN take off the rubber gloves and feed my critters their hay and what not. (that helps my gloves last longer).

One pair lasts for me 2-4 weeks (they cost 99 cents). for many folks I'm sure they'd last longer but I'm (how do I say this) prone to not having things out last me very long. A box of surgical gloves last me more than a year (cost of $10)

So am I missing something here?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
621 Posts
I'll be honest and admit it never even occurred to me. My dd and her chapped hands thank you! We even have tons of them (gloves) due to her IVIg treatments. I'm addle-brained, what can I say?:shrug::D

Jessie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,872 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I learned a side benefit to rubber gloves.... had one doe that's always been a sweetheart, watchful with her kits but never even remotely nasty. Her last litter she turned into this decidedly nasty piece of work and one day decided to grab me...she grabbed the glove instead and pulled hard. glad it was the glove that died rather than a piece of my finger. Wow...she stayed nasty. Had to hold her down or remove her to do ANYTHING with the kits. once they were weanable...out she went.
 

·
STILL not Alice
Joined
·
20,705 Posts
The problem I have with gloves is that I lose some dexterity when I wear them. Rubber or nitrile gloves make my hands sweat.

But I would rather have a wet glove stick to the cage when the weather is below freezing than my fingers!
 
G

·
I had pretty good luck with those insulated "chilly" grip gloves. They're not water proof, but you don't lose much dexterity. Hang them by the stove after AM chores and they'll be ready to go in no time.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,233 Posts
Gloves were always a problem for me when I lived "up north" ... always had livestock and had to do outside chores, often several hours a day, feeding, watering, cleaning ... loading hay on a truck, even riding. And in temperatures that can get down to minus-20 for lows and stay at zero for highs ... for days ... you try all sorts of things.

Dexterity is a problem, of course ... latches, hooks, harness buckles. For those kinds of temperatures the best solution I found was two pair of gloves. I had a very light pair of driving type gloves ... not sure what they were made from, but they were quite warm for their weight. I cut the tips of the fingers off those gloves and they were my "undergloves".

The only gloves I ever found that would actually keep my hands warm at those extreme temperatures, working outside for several hours at a stretch, were the insulated snow machine gloves. They were thick and you couldn't get "small stuff" done with them on, but the would keep your hands warm. Those gloves went on over the "undergloves" and were attached to the sleeve of my insulated coveralls with a heavy pin and a cord. That allowed me to strip those gloves off without losing them when I had to do something that required dexterity but still able to put them back on quickly as soon as that was done.

Losing a heavy glove 10 miles from the ranch when you're out feeding cattle and it's minus-20 before you figure in the windchill is NOT something you want to do. And in that country, at those temperatures, you don't have much problem with getting your hands wet ... everything is frozen.

Here, in Kentucky, I have had a problem with wet gloves ... temperatures low enough to be cold but not cold enough to keep everything frozen. My solution here is to buy the cheap cotton gloves that have the little rubber dots on them to help hang onto things ... which is one of the big problems I have dealing with wet pitchfork handles, gates, etc. They're cheap, from one of the construction equipment supply companies. I get them in packs of 10 or a dozen pair, we only have 15 acres or so here, so I'm never far from the house and I just change to a dry pair between sets of chores.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top