Has anyone seen this before?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by cindyh, Jul 17, 2004.

  1. cindyh

    cindyh Member

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    I have a doe kid, born if Feb., who has udder development on one side of her udder only. I can actually express a few drops of milk from the teat. The other teat is flat against the abdomen (looks normal). The enlarged side is soft and is not hot to touch. There is no sign of infection. Is this what is known as a "maiden udder?" It's the only thing in the literature I can find that might explain it. But how long does it last? Why only one side? This goat is supposed to be shown in October at the county fair.
     
  2. Julia

    Julia Well-Known Member

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    Sorry, but enlargement of only half the udder means mastitis, and that's difficult to treat in a virgin doe. It usually destroys that half of the udder before she ever freshens. I've seen it in herds that have a copper deficiency problem. You can culture and treat, and indeed you should if you value the doeling, but it doesn't usually work out well.

    A precocious milker will show enlargement of both halves of the udder. That's OK. Only one side is trouble.
     

  3. Stacy Adams

    Stacy Adams Well-Known Member

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    I had that happen to two doelings last year, both from different does, had both does and yearlings tested for mastitis, and nada, zero, zip.. it eventually went away.. I never did find out what caused it.. :no:
     
  4. cindyh

    cindyh Member

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    Thanks for your reply, Stacy. I feel a little better. I can't think that it's mastitis because the udder is very soft, not hot, and not tender. I can't understand why mastitis would cause milk production, either. I will keep an eye on her.
     
  5. oberhaslikid

    oberhaslikid Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Cindyh,Please before you do nothing at least have it cultured and find out for sure. I had to give up 2 of my favorite does due to staff mastitis that was passed from mother to daughter.They did exactly what you are discribing.
     
  6. oberhaslikid

    oberhaslikid Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Staff mastitis stays in the body and doesnt rear its ugly head untill the hormones kick in ,thats why the milk.Its not really milk because if you looked at it. It looks like watery milk.I milked it out of my doeling and treated with dry cow and then I thought I had it licked untill she freshened and what a disaster.Its not easy to get rid of .I took her to the vet and we treated and treated and the vet said to get her over it and get rid of her.Hard thing to do.Staff mastitis has a resistance to anibiotic.
     
  7. Stacy Adams

    Stacy Adams Well-Known Member

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    Oh yes, Cindyh, please have it checked! I wasn't implying that nothing needed to be done and it would just go away.. :eek: I did have mine tested and it did go away, but that was what happened to me. When something strange happens to your girls, you should always want to know (and seek out) "why"..
    We can still HOPE it's nothing! :D
     
  8. cindyh

    cindyh Member

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    Well......took the goat to the vet. Long story short, had to ask for a culture--he almost laughed in my face when I suggested Staph. However, he did do a culture and it came back negative today. He has a theory that someone is "sucking" this side. I assured him that this was not happening. He said " wanna bet?" So I went home, smeared some bright pink stuff on the udder and teat, and sure enough, no one had a pink mouth or nose. So I guess I'm back to square one. Thanks for the input. It's only because I do want to get to the bottom of this that I posted the question.