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We are looking at getting 1 or 2 pigs in the spring. We first thought about just getting 1 because that's all we need and to butcher a 2nd that we don't need seems like a waste. Then we found out pigs are social animals. Has anyone raised just 1 and have any tips?
 

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We are looking at getting 1 or 2 pigs in the spring. We first thought about just getting 1 because that's all we need and to butcher a 2nd that we don't need seems like a waste. Then we found out pigs are social animals. Has anyone raised just 1 and have any tips?
You can raise just one pig. You can be its buddy. :)
 

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All the time. A single pig is much like a single dog. Give them a ball to play with, a bowling ball and a tire swing high enough they can just reach it with their nose....James
 

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Great - that is a relief, I kept reading that you had to have 2 and I couldn't figure out what we were going to do with 2. Thanks. I like the ball idea, I bet they like kongs just like the dog.
 

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We have a kunekune boar that has been raised with a calf (Kobe). We let Boris (boar) out to forage on acorns and Kobe bawls while Boris forages even though he is in sight of Kobe. Animals just need a friend and it doesn't have to be the same species......
 

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Yes, you can raise a single pig. They are competitive feeders and herd animals so they tend to grow faster as groups. Alone is doable though.

-Walter
 

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Yes, you can raise a single pig. They are competitive feeders and herd animals so they tend to grow faster as groups. Alone is doable though.

-Walter
That is good to know, so plan on a little extra time with one.
 

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If you have the space, think about raising 2. It's not any more work to raise 2 than 1, and if you can find somebody to buy the other one, you can save some money on the one you keep.
 

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I can see a probable problem raising just one. Wouldn't it be inclined to stay with the others animals, even sleep in the barn? Wouldn't they create a muddy waddle where you may not want one?
 

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Just out of curiousity - for those of you who have sold your other pigs, how easy is it? Remembering that we are new to an area, know no one other than who we work with and don't have a csa or farmers market etc. etc.
 

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Just put the word out that you're raising a pig for yourself and will have an extra and you'll likely find someone else who wants one very quickly among family, friends, coworkers and neighbors. Depending on your local laws you may need the meat to be butchered under inspection if selling but that is not a big issue. Just don't under charge because you'll find very quickly many people are interested...

Please fill in your location information which makes it easier to answer questions. At the very least your zone. See this thread:

http://www.homesteadingtoday.com/livestock-forums/pigs/505485-please-fill-location-info.html

-Walter
 

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Craigslist works great. The first "extra" pigs I sold were to people I worked with. Having a couple pigs came up in conversation, and people were kind of intrigued. It was a lot easier than I would have thought. Since you're not getting them until spring, talk it up a little bit and you may have the extra one (or two) spoken for before you even buy them.

I had a butcher who swore by a 1/4 - 3/4 rule. Selling 3 halves will make the half you keep free, processing included. It's pretty accurate, if not even a little conservative.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Just put the word out that you're raising a pig for yourself and will have an extra and you'll likely find someone else who wants one very quickly among family, friends, coworkers and neighbors. Depending on your local laws you may need the meat to be butchered under inspection if selling but that is not a big issue. Just don't under charge because you'll find very quickly many people are interested...

Please fill in your location information which makes it easier to answer questions. At the very least your zone. See this thread:

http://www.homesteadingtoday.com/livestock-forums/pigs/505485-please-fill-location-info.html

-Walter
From what I've heard (but I haven't researched it myself) is that usually the buyer pays live weight cost to you and you deliver it to the butcher and they pay the butcher for cuts.
 

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The best way to price is by the pound of hanging weight after slaughter. The processor will have a good scale for an accurate weight. The buyer is only paying for what will be processed. The buyer pays for processing. I've found this to be the most fair and accurate way to do it.

If you can, find a processor that will take them in dead, and find someone to do the slaughter and transport. You have to arrange the deal with the buyer first, but this method falls under the "custom exempt" processing rules that exempts you from having to have inspected slaughter. It is SOOO much easier for somebody else to transport a dead carcass than for you to haul live hogs. Call around to processors in your area. If they do take in carcasses for custom processing, they most likely have names of mobile slaughter people.
 

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The best way to price is by the pound of hanging weight after slaughter. The processor will have a good scale for an accurate weight. The buyer is only paying for what will be processed. The buyer pays for processing. I've found this to be the most fair and accurate way to do it.

If you can, find a processor that will take them in dead, and find someone to do the slaughter and transport. You have to arrange the deal with the buyer first, but this method falls under the "custom exempt" processing rules that exempts you from having to have inspected slaughter. It is SOOO much easier for somebody else to transport a dead carcass than for you to haul live hogs. Call around to processors in your area. If they do take in carcasses for custom processing, they most likely have names of mobile slaughter people.
That does sound a lot easier - definately something to look in to.
 
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