Has anyone made the plunge from city life to rural life without all the eggs lined up

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by perennial, Mar 1, 2005.

  1. perennial

    perennial Well-Known Member

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    See new thread under Our Plan for Moving rural - any advice please
     
  2. hollym

    hollym Well-Known Member

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    Well? About ten years ago, my then husband and I took the plunge. We sold everything electrical, unneccessary, cosmetic, etc, bought tools, 20 acres, and a 15' camper, and headed to the property in Montana with two kids, four rabbits, and a dog. The kids slept in the camper, and we slept in a tent. It was FREEZING!! This was in May, but we were above 5000 feet.

    So it can be done, and I enjoyed almost all of the next 8 years. We built animal sheds out of logging slab leftovers, I think a semi load dumped on your place was $85 back then? What was too thick for building with we cut up for firewood. I bought a bunch of chickens from a lady who was getting out of the chicken business, then ended up trading most of them, with some cash, to a lady for some baby goats that she needed to get rid of. I'll never forget the looks we got driving home in the Suburban with four baby goats standing in the back looking out the back windows and over our shoulders!

    So, made lots of mistakes, had way too much fun, scrounged my way to the top, lol, as in, we did have a house when we left there, largely constructed out of scrounged and used materials. The back wall of one bedroom was made of those wooden overseas storage crates for example, they make excellent closets.

    But it is hard, I won't deny it. My then husband folded before it was all over. My kids complained about it, but now that they are in their 20's they tell me it was life enriching. I simply wanted to do it more than anything, and I don't recall ever feeling like I couldn't do it? In fact at some point, I'm going to do it again, only on my own.

    hollym
     

  3. Dreams30

    Dreams30 Lady Rider

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    Yep, we did it. Jan 11th, this year we arrived at our place. There was no road to this little "hunting shack" (read: no elect or plumbing). We had a road put in, an RV pulled onto the place, elect and septic within a month. We are still making the cabin livable.

    We agonized and debated, (even see threads in this forum) over whether to go then, wait till summer, or wait a couple of years and save money to go. We did worry about the money but, we knew that we would take whatever jobs we could to get out of there.

    It was hard and it was fun. Most memorable so far has been cutting a path up to the shack with tree saws and pulling a garden cart loaded with camping stuff up the trail the first night so that we could set up camp. :haha:

    We were very afraid to leave our jobs and our home. We wanted to plan it all out and in the end we just had to go. We had already bought our land so we knew exactly where we were going.

    I started my new job this week. We found out 2 weeks ago that our old house was under contract, closing this month. The guy who put in our septic sold us a tractor and trailer. Things have worked out.

    I'm not saying that it will be perfect. A sense of humor and a deep belief in what you are doing helps a lot. Faith in God is a nice help too.

    Doing without for a bit is ok. At my new job, every hour I look at the clock and smile thinking "that's one more sheet of plywood I just made the money to buy." It does tend to put a whole new perspective on things. ;)
     
  4. Grandmotherbear

    Grandmotherbear Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We had a 2 year plan that was making no progress after several months- to downsize and move. My enquiries at the local hospice resulted in a job offer- 5 days instead of the 4 I was looking for. My interviewer said " Almost all our nurses hired on for 5 days but went to part time after orientation was completed- I'm sure you'll have no problems". By the time I had worked out my notice and relocated, she had left and her replacement had it in for me. My husband, who had originally agreed to join me after I completed orientation, didn't. He had no reasons, either. Just convinced himself that he had moved over when in fact he was only spending weekends. Health problems intervened, and the quality of medical care was better back in the city. I couldn't get time off to take care of my health, so I left and moved back to the city. Fortunately, my old job took me back. But its not a sinecure. Its future is shaky. The job my husband had, that may have been part of the reason he didn't move, went away. At least the experience got me seriously interested in making the cabin liveable for the future...
     
  5. Grandmotherbear

    Grandmotherbear Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I gave it 6 months, BTW. I would probably have been willing to stay, even at 5 days wkly work instead of 4, if dh had moved over with me...
     
  6. perennial

    perennial Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for your responses. hubby is going down very soon to tie up loose
    ends on that side of things, now i just have to get our house ready to sell and
    pack, etc. I'm at home so that's my job now!

    I'll let you know how it all turns out.
     
  7. Cosmic

    Cosmic Well-Known Member

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    Brural

    I think you are doing too much the zero or 100% scenario.

    I am moving from Ma. at the end of this month. Going to just outside a small town in Ohio. Actually bought a house without physically seeing it. The differentials between Ma and Oh are so huge that the risk is zero. The over night funds rates is the governing factor. In essence I can buy a house in a small town with all of the creature comforts and completely pay for it in < 2 years with just the interest.

    My plans are to have creature comforts in a "City Place"

    Within that sphere is plenty of "Country Space", say within 30 -50 miles. I will get a very wooded space to completely escape this World. I do not want a tent or to suffer for some "Pure" sense of existence.

    I have been in all 50 states, around the World a number of times. Born on a small farm in Ohio. I do not understand a common theme from many. This anti-social part about never seeing or knowing their neighbors.

    I need and want social people within my living space. I want nice friendly people who share my values. I do not want to be some sort of crackpot hermit.

    I do not believe it is about rural or city. I know tons about both. I want both, some sense of neighbors, some social framework. Ideal is to have totally rural environment that I can come and leave at will. Have many, many neighbors who function as family.

    Some seem to promote this idea of individual as a pure "Life Style". I also served in the Navy in the Submarine Service. This idea of "Social" with " Individual" abilities to adapt to your particular desires is only within a regime that is smaller than many pretend or that it even could be achieved on that basis. One thing service on a submarine teaches is the human values. Everything depends on someone else, good humor and a view of what the "Common Good Requires".

    My move back to a more rural environment is based on the submarine experience. Extreme knowledge and ability to perform over a rather large scale, understanding of a project as a human endeavor, to stay, about like coming into port.
     
  8. perennial

    perennial Well-Known Member

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    Cosmic,

    We are going to do it. We are planning on moving to a small town so we
    can have a community feel and live about 30 minutes from a small city that
    has conveniences if we decide we need them. Don't get me wrong, we like
    people, but i prefer to have some acreage 5 +- just so we can do our "own" thing. I think it would be nice to look down that property and see another
    house/neighbor there.

    Where i live there are houses 32 feet from my house one one side. Everyone
    here as you i'm sure as seen has very small amounts of land. I want to
    be able to rip apart my whole yard if i please to garden with not offending
    people and i want to live in a place where there are thousands of people
    on the roads all the time. The pace is far too fast here, the expenses and
    the fact that the cost of living is crazy for a family.
     
  9. Corky

    Corky Well-Known Member

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    I am so glad that we are getting some not sucessful stories on here.
    I really bothers me when everyone paints such a rosey picture that some poor trusting soals quit their good jobs, sell everything they can and pack up the kids and dogs and just light out for parts unknown thinking everything will just work out fine.
    Sometimes you get lucky and it does but I am willing to bet that most of the time it doesn't. The loosers don't have a computer left to get on here and tell you their story.
    I am not trying to be a neigh sayer but I just want you homesteader want to bes to think through what you really want to do.
    The chances of making a living off of the land and not holding down regular jobs is about as good as winning the lottery. Yeah, some do win but not many.
    I am a homesteader, of sorts. We did raise most of our own food for a few years but we are gitting too old to do all that work and don't like to be so tied down that we can't even go visit our Children and Grandchildren.
    I still grow a big garden and we have some animals and chickens.
    I raise registered dairy goats right now but have promised my DH to get rid of all but a couple of goats for our own use.
    You have to make your own choices but like I said please learn the down side as well as the up side for making that move.
    This move can make your Family stronger and happier or it can distroy your marrage. If you pay attention to a lot of these stories you will see that it has done both.
    Now that I have finished preaching I will say that there is no way that either of us would move back to the city.
    We did not make a total (cut loose and go), decision though. We bought our place and I moved here while he stayed there except on weekends. He took care of tying up loose ends on his side and I settled us in here. We both kept our jobs there and so I had lunch with him everyday too.
    When I got my job down here he sold our business there and took his retirement and moved here. We sold our home there and put the money on this place and it is now paid for.
    We did raise lots of critters and had a lot of fun doing it. We have been here 10 years and have tried lots of things and enjoyed them all but have finally almost got adjusted to what is right and comfortable for us to be the happiest here.
    I want you all to be able to do this but don't risk loosing it all in the process.
    THINK! THINK! THINK! Then go and have fun!!!! :)
     
  10. thebeav

    thebeav Well-Known Member

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    Eggs go in a basket and ducks get lined up, as in a row.

    I'm still planning and saving for jump to rual life. But I hope I get it right.
     
  11. Thumper/inOkla.

    Thumper/inOkla. Well-Known Member

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    centeral Okla. S of I-40, E of I-35
    :haha: :haha: :haha: :haha:


    Duh,

    Buy land (no water, no house, no barn, no gate to get into the place)
    sell house in city at a loss.
    build 20x30ft sheet metal barn over 3 day weekend in JULY
    move contence of a 1800sq ft house into 20x30 barn
    live in barn for 4 months
    get 16x16x16 cabin built >large box<
    live in large box [16x16x16 cabin with no windows all winter, most of time, alone with just dogs]
    spring comes get windows, BE VERY HAPPY to see sunlight!

    :D
     
  12. Quint

    Quint Well-Known Member

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    I don't regret moving back to the homestead even though it was really difficult and stressful to do. My only regret is that I didn't do it sooner.

    I lived in a metro area and despised it. The only things I liked were being able to get food delivered (single guys love that) and the symphony and opera. I will admit I miss being able to order pizza at 2 am or when I don't want to cook. The constant noise, crowds and the general attitude of the people I simply hated. I lived in small town and didn't like it either but it was better than living in the big city. Still too much noise and the neighbors are too close. I like being here in a rural farming area. My neighbors are far away and it is quiet. It is not that I am a hermit or anti-social. I just want to deal with people when I want to and on my own terms. I don't want to have to deal with a neighbor right on top of me or have one in my business. If I need help or something my neighbors would be right there as I would be for them. We have a community while we maintain our independence and privacy. At a minimum if you can stand on the top of your house and see or hear your neighbors they are too close. Maybe it is genetic but I cant stand being cooped up or crammed into a city or town. My folks were always pioneers. Tough farmers and ranchers that hacked homesteads out of the wilderness.

    I also like that I can do what I want here with little governmental interference. I need no building permits, there are no codes or inspections of any kind. When I built my house I needed no permits and I had no inspectors nosing around my place. If I don't want to cut my grass or shovel my sidewalk there isn't some government thug here writing me as ticket. If my rooster crows I don't have some jackass complaining about it. If they did the sheriff would laugh and tell them to mind their own business.

    I am a redneck hillbilly country boy through and through.
     
  13. roncarla

    roncarla Well-Known Member

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    We've moved across country with no plan many times....but that's another story.

    The first time was about 14 years ago. We had only been married for 11 months and were living in Texas (where I'm from). Ron had always wanted to live in Colorado and I had never been to Colorado so we went for a week long vacation. Two weeks later, we moved there. Fortunately, at least we had the good sense to buy a 4x4 first. We moved to an efficience apartment in Littleton (there was just the two of us and a Yorkie). A few months later, we bought a sweet little cabin on two acres in Conifer -- about 9,000 feet up.

    One piece of advice. If you are buying property on a street named "Snowy Trail", it's a good idea to buy it in the winter. We had no idea what kind of snowfall we would be up against. I can tell you right now, it was a lot. I saw more snow the first day than I had in my entire life.

    Anyway, it turned about to be a fabulous learning experience, one that neither of us regret and we still miss living there (after 2-1/2 years, we moved cross-country again). We learned that you do make mistakes and learn as you go. The important thing is that you learn not to make the same mistake twice.