Has anyone lived on land in a motor home or travel trailer etc?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Deb862, Mar 9, 2010.

  1. Deb862

    Deb862 Well-Known Member

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    I'm sure some here have done this and would like to know if it worked for you (or not!) and for how long. As property prices are rather expensive, we are looking at the possibility of living on 5-10 acres in a motorhome or 5th wheel for a few years until we can build a cabin debt free. Of course, being in the North we plan to move South for the winters but were thinking this would be great way to afford a property we couldn't otherwise afford if it came with a house already. It's just the 2 of us, no kids, so we're thinking that would make it a ton easier. Anything we're not considering? Thanks for any advice and would love to hear your story!
     
  2. SFM in KY

    SFM in KY Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I was single, but lived in a travel trailer at the ranch where I worked/leased in Montana for two years before I moved to Kentucky. Had electricity available ... that was it for modern conveniences, but I didn't find it a problem.

    A younger couple who bought some acreage from us are living in a travel trailer while they are "reorganizing" and getting things to the point where they can live on their acreage. They do have access to electric, septic, water here.

    Biggest issue for me in Montana in the trailer was insulation/heat ... I think their biggest issue may be actual space for two people.
     

  3. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    Check with the county...anonymously of course. I know our county does not allow anyone to live in an RV or travel trailer for more than 30 consecutive days at a time.
     
  4. Trisha in WA

    Trisha in WA Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We are currently living in a 5th wheel on property. Winters are tricky, but there are things that can be done if you wanted to stay. Space is a challenge especially if you get one that doesn't have tip outs. We have lived in a travel trailer in an RV park before too and that was aweful. That trailer was bigger and more comfortable, but the surroundings made all the difference.
    So, if it is legal, I say go for it.
     
  5. blooba

    blooba Well-Known Member

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    A nearby thrown together shed/barn or storage trailer/shipping container would come in handy to store things and do things that can't be done in the trailer. Tools, furniture, ect will take up too much room and cause space issues most of the time.
     
  6. 7thswan

    7thswan Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We put a 5th on our property to live in it. It would be just fine,as it has whats called a Heated Basement.We also insulated arround the bottem, and built a cookhouse for our wood cookstove. The local building inspector, was the problem for the young couple we sold the land to. We kept the 5th. They had built a small cabin. Long proscess of Legal mess. Needless to say it depends on the law.
     
  7. Deb862

    Deb862 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for letting me know that. Will definitely have to check on the legal issues when considering parcels of land. DH's idea is to build a barn/outbuilding large enough to house the trailer/MH in and also to give us room to spread out a little. Do you know would I check with village/town or county or state on that?
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2010
  8. Micahn

    Micahn Well-Known Member

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    I personally have not but have a uncle that did.
    He got himself a nice camper and lived it while building his home. After the home was dries in he was able to move it into the garage.
    Now that the home is done he uses it as sort of a guest house. The wife and I stayed in it while there a couple of years ago. It was nice.
     
  9. Harry Chickpea

    Harry Chickpea Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We did for about six months - didn't want to deal with the winter hassles, so moved out when the really cold weather hit. It was fun for us. We have an old house on the property that is not usable as a dwelling, so we stored a lot of stuff in it. That freed up the trailer for our use. I'm cleaning the trailer up to sell this spring. With luck, we'll get almost the amount we paid for it back, less the cost of some repairs and a little depreciation. When the recession hit and the RV industry stopped manufacturing, it started pulling up the resale value of older units.
     
  10. Navotifarm

    Navotifarm Well-Known Member

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    Popular Science magazine had a wonderful article. About a couple who built a kind of "docking station" garage/extra room for an rv. It has a big living room' fireplace, comfy big picnic table for dining. YoU could back your rv alongside to sleep and cook in while being able to step from it into the big room. I never saw such a thing myself but am told there are whole "snowbird" developments which sell small parcels of land with these buildings and other amenities in Arizona.

    I acquired wooded land where I "camped out" for years. Your idea worked for me. I posted some of this experience in an earlier thread.
     
  11. Wisconsin Ann

    Wisconsin Ann Happy Scrounger

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    Our county/village doesn't allow living in an RV, trailer, etc. on your own land unless you move it ever 30 days, so that they know it's not a permanent residence (which seems to be the thing they're worried about). SO....we just moved the thing a couple of feet ever month :D Made them happy.

    Now..with a tailer with a holding tank, you'll want to do that anyway...take a mini trip to the local RV station for dumping and getting more water..maybe once a week?

    If it's inside a shed, no one will see it and wno't worry about it.

    BUT, check with your county's ordinances. hmm...our county has a website that lets me check stuff like that. OR you can at least find out who to call. Just call the clerk at the county building and ask your question. he/she will know who you need to talk to. The clerks know EVERYTHING. (like ours did. She told us how to word our question to the guy who runs the sanitary stuff (water and sewer) so that we could have our envirolet AND have running water..and yes, that's a problem for this guy. If you have runnign water, you HAVE to have a septic system for black water..even if you have no blackwater)

    heh. almost forgot about living in one. Yes, it's fine...as long as you keep it tidy for each other, and decluttered. Easy in the summer when you can spread out into a tent, or on the picnic table. Winter it gets a bit...tight..for some folks.
     
  12. bluefish

    bluefish Wait................what?

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    We did it for two years in an 18' camp trailer in Oregon. And had a baby whilst there. We did build a 'shop' to put the trailer in for the winter and had a woodstove in the shop for heat. Long as you weren't further from the stove the 6" or so, it was warm enough. :D We also found an old 1950's propane cookstove and hooked that up to a 5 gal propane bottle for cooking. Then we found a 40 gal propane hot water heater for $40 when the local hardware store went out. Woohoo! Hot water! Refrigerator was a couple of ice chests buried in the ground outside. We had a generator hooked up to the well and we'd run it once a day or so for just long enough to fill up the pressure tank we installed in the shop. Before we got the shop up, I do remember a time or two of running out of water in the trailer in midshower and having to grab a towel and walk the full length of the property up the well and generator to turn it on, fill up the trailer and go back to finish rinsing. Thank goodness we had no neighbors!
     
  13. spiritrider

    spiritrider Well-Known Member

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    phone company may not hook up to it. wouldn't here.

    shadowrider
     
  14. Trisha in WA

    Trisha in WA Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We hooked up our own phone...they just had to put in a jack on the pole like normal.
     
  15. tamsam

    tamsam Well-Known Member

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    I lived in a 36 ft. motor home for a year and it was nice. Best thing was if you wanted to go somewhere to visit just unhook the water and elect cord and go. I did under pen it in the winter and put heat tape on the water hose and put the insulation on and wrapped with plastic. Had no problems even at 0 degrees. we still have it and use for a guest room when we have a lot of company. Sam
     
  16. adamtheha

    adamtheha Well-Known Member

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    I had some friends that tried it here in Canada, and the local government shot it down real quick!
    If you are going to try it, make sure you talk to neighbors first, talk to building officials second, and connect all utilities third.
    I think a cheap mobile home would be a better choice with more space, or even an old construction trailer. With a larger home, you can put a woodstove in it, and maybe rig up some renewable energy
    If you can spare 10k and you're decently handy, build a tiny cabin, and then convert it into a garage later. Prolly wouldn't take more than 3 weeks to build one.
    Most travel trailers are designed for occassional use, and anything more permanent is going to wear it out fast. Things like doors, windows, slideouts, tires will probably break in time, and that will cut the value when you resell it.
    Most counties hate these, unless you really sell it well to the planning commission.
     
  17. HermitJohn

    HermitJohn Well-Known Member

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    All depends on location. I lived couple years in an old school bus back in early 80s in Michigan, but local govts keep tightening the screws and fewer places you can get away with it. Still some localities where there is no local zoning/codes and national codes arent enforced. But those places are fewer and fewer and usually in very rural areas where jobs are scarce and the yuppies havent taken over "to protect their investments". And even that is no guarentee. It probably wont be that many years until if you want to homestead without a couple million in the bank, you will have to move to a third world country. Kinda amazing that the most freedom would be in some backwater ruled by some crazy tinpot dictator stuffing his Swiss bank account with the international aide his country gets.
     
  18. Mel-

    Mel- Well-Known Member

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    I was planning on doing this but have found most of the land I am looking at the elec company won't hook up without a permanent foundation and water already on the property. I need elec for my online business.
     
  19. blooba

    blooba Well-Known Member

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    Solar,wind with a good battery/inverter setup will supply all the power you "NEED". You won't be able to run A/C or demand alot without spending a small fortune but its very doable.
     
  20. Navotifarm

    Navotifarm Well-Known Member

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    There are many people who live in rv's or travel trailers year-round. They call themselves "full-timers." They have lots of cunning tricks for survival, some of which you can adopt for full-timing on your own land or other people's land while saving up enough money to buy your own, or researching the best place to settle down.

    One thing is solar and other alternate energy forms which are not as regulated on travel trailers as on stationary dwellings. Another is mail service - don't set up a mail box or have delivery to your property. Get a P.O. Box or mail forwarding service or make a deal with a friend or family member.

    Full timers set up a "legal residence" in a state with the most tax advantages such as Texas or Alabama and have mail forwarded.

    If you are going to camp on your own land then you logically would not have permanent things such as electricity, running water, septic system or landline phones, all of which require permits, permissions, bureaucrats, inspectors, etc. Most of these things can be created variously in your travel vehicle. I have a blackberry, for example which I can use as a tethered or external modem or I surf the internet at free hotspots with my lap top.

    In my area, there used to be laws about cisterns and water collection but, interestingly, they were struck off the books so it's easy to set up a rain water collection system in second-hand applejuice or other 50-gallon potable products barrels, buying your drinking water at Walmart.

    For a composting toilet, I bought an invalid's chair bucket toilet at Goodwill for $15, put sawdust in it, and do the composting outside with coffee grounds, weeds, avocado pits, any compostable items my dogs and poultry don't eat, leaves, weeds and lotsa cardboard.

    The Tiny House website and blogs is chockfull of wonderful ideas you can adopt or use as a springboard for your own travel trailer homesteading, so go for it and good luck!