Has anyone had a Nationwide Modular home built for them?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by perennial, Mar 4, 2005.

  1. perennial

    perennial Well-Known Member

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    Just curious if anyone out there had a Nationwide modular home built for them?
    Or, for any of you that have built a modular, is there any options that you really regret not getting?

    We are going for a 1750 sq. foot house which we have no and works for us. The idea for us is not to spend, spend, spend. We are moving to go rural, not
    to have the biggest, hugest house. We are trying to not have a mortgage at all or only for land if we do.

    We are thinking of the options/upgrades that mater most for us and didn't know
    if anyone had any suggestions.
     
  2. Hoop

    Hoop Well-Known Member

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    Yeah,
    I suggest you avoid the modular altogether and buy/build a stick built home. Your investment will appreciate handsomely with a stick built. You never know with a modular.

    Its your $$.
     

  3. rannie

    rannie Well-Known Member

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    I worked for Nationwide Homes for 3 yrs.... they drilled into us that their homes do not depreciate..... yeah right .... I then went to work as a loan officer for a Bank Banks do not like modulars they do depreciate... and they are not built as well as stick built (if you have a good contractor for the stick built). If I were you I would first look into what it would costs to just build. weight out the pros and cons. There are companies that build to certain steps and you can finish that saves money. You could look into self contracting too. that takes a lot of research. A modular is built in a factory just like a manufactured home just like a moblie Home just like a trailor over the years they just get better names. Good Luck Rannie
     
  4. jack_c-ville

    jack_c-ville Well-Known Member

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    I've looked at their specs and was not impressed. 2x8 joists, 3/8" sheathing, and 2x3 interior framing. It all adds up to a flimsy house. I would build a garage or a shed to those specs. But not a permanant house. The bones of a house are not the place to cut corners and save money. When you cheap out on framing materials you are stuck with it forever. It's not like siding, flooring or trim that you can update down the road.

    Sure, they will build with better materials than that if you ask them to. But the prices that they wave around to get you in the door all depend on specs like those.

    -Jack
     
  5. Jan Doling

    Jan Doling Well-Known Member

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    Build a stick house....since you don't need a big one, build in such a way that you can add to it later (for instance, a covered patio now can be enclosed as a sun-room later.) Get the most for your money by doing it right to start with and doing all your homework. You may not be worried about resale, but think of your heirs.
     
  6. oz in SC

    oz in SC Well-Known Member

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    It is easy for people to say stick build a house but when building costs run about $100+/foot you are either going to have a 600 square foot house or be in severe debt.

    Also Mrs oz works with almost every contractor here every day and when she states it would be difficult to pick a builder who does decent work you really have to wonder.

    By the way,around here houses START at $120/foot and go up VERY quickly.
     
  7. coalroadcabin

    coalroadcabin Well-Known Member

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    cost of construction has increased here in VA about 25% in the past 9 months or so (at least this is the information I'm currently getting from experts) and it is not unheard of for a modest stick built home to run in the $125-$185 per sq/ft range But having said that, maybe building a smaller home - say 900 sq ft on top of a walk-out basement would give you the room you need (you could finish the basement as time and money become available to you) And if you're handy enough to to some construction yourself - like paint, paper, install flooring and trim, etc. plus if you also use less expensive materials for some things that can be upgraded later on-like carpet, interior doors and trim, kitchen cabinets, only install one bath but rough in a second, etc. you may be able to get a stick built home for about what a modular would cost.
     
  8. wy0mn

    wy0mn Transplanted RedNeck

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    My home was a 'Premier', but I'd definately advise FOR tubs & sinks with overflow protection, shutoff valves on every darned sink, tub, shower & toilet, and outside outlets where YOU want them.
    These three things will increase your comfort zone immensely, and should not be assumed to be a given. They are optional, you will pay extra for them, but will appreciate them in the long run.
    The first time you have to replace linoleum or carpet due to a child flooded tub, you'll remember me. :) (done that)
    The first time you have to shut off water at the source because you have no shutoff valves, to fix a frozen & burst waterline, you'll think of me. (been there, have the T-shirt)
    When you have to pay to have an AC unit repaired because your only outside outlet allows the AC to be used as a sawhorse/workbench... (yup, I was an idiot...) (feel my pain).
    Bathroom exhaust fans, lights in the closets & under the counters are nice too, but the top three are imperative.
    Plan your home, you'll be paying for it for a LONGGGGGG time.
     
  9. jack_c-ville

    jack_c-ville Well-Known Member

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    Part of my job is figuring out replacement cost of houses in VA and MD. Construction costs have indeed gone up, but 25% in 9 months is pushing it. More like 25% in the last 2 years (which is still a lot). Tax assessments have gone up at that kind of rate in Northern Virginia. But most of that is the increase in land value.

    Those suggestions for ways to build on the cheap are very, very good ones. Most people build much more square footage than they need. In fact, the first question that most people (with any budget) ask about a house is 'what's the square footage?' People are far more preoccupied with the size of their homes than they should be. I'll take a well-designed house of 1,000 sq ft over a poorly laid-out one of 1,400 sq ft any day.

    How big is your family? I have a family of 3 plus 3 dogs and we are planning more children. My whole house is about 2,600 sq ft. including the finished walkout basement. What we actually use on a regular basis is closer to 1,000 sq ft. Formal dining rooms, seperate living and family rooms and guest rooms are nice to have. But if you're on a tight budget then why pay $100 a square foot for rooms that only get used once a month? And how big does a bedroom need to be if all it does (for grownups) is contain the bed? The plans I'm looking at for the first stage of our next house are no more than 1,500 sq. ft. and generally smaller.

    Here's a source for house plans that are very attractive and laid out carefully to be no larger than they need to be (thus cheaper to build): http://www.robinsonplans.com/

    -Jack



     
  10. coalroadcabin

    coalroadcabin Well-Known Member

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    jack,
    You are probably right, we are looking at building a log home (I know, expensive, but it's what we've always wanted) and that is the 25% and $125-$185/sq ft. number I've been getting - I should have thought my response through a bit, huh? :eek:
     
  11. Hoop

    Hoop Well-Known Member

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    The reason I'm so down on modular homes is that one of my good friends had one built. No I don't know the brand.
    His modular looks exactly like a "real" house from the outside. Once you walk inside, you immediately know you're not inside a "real" house. Perhaps it those cheap windows. Or that cheap cardboard like interior walls. Maybe its the cheap bathroom fixtures. Maybe its the kitchen countertop with that 3/4" sag in it! When & if this house goes up for sale, I suspect it will languish on the market for a long time. The house is not all that different than one of those older single wide trailers.

    Even with this poorly built excuse of a dwelling, his property will likely appreciate. He has 28 acres on a main highway with his own well & septic system. Land continues to appreciate in this part of Northern Wisconsin at around 20% per year.
    If he had spend the extra dollars and had a stick built house constructed, his property wouldn't have just appreciated, it would have skyrocketed.
     
  12. stonefly71

    stonefly71 Well-Known Member

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    When not look into the way I plan to build my house in the next few years . That is to build a pole type barn and turn it into a house as I go along. At least you will have a roof over your head and the shell for a pole barn is quit cheap and you could build a real nice size house for probably 1/3 to 1/2 the cost of a house that is stick built. That is just my plan and then I'm going to build my work shop out of the straw bale type building. And plan for it all to be wind,water or solar powered. Not sure yet as I still need to get the land but that will come when I get my settelment from workers comp. Later and good luck with what ever you choose. Matt
     
  13. Sparticle

    Sparticle Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Check these guys out as an alternative. I have NO experience with them, I just wanted to go Yurt but didn't because I thought I needed to get a HUD loan. If I had to do it over again I would NOT have gotten this modular home. I don't know what I would have done, but this has been a huge headache. I think maybe it was because the builders were so horrible. They didn't even put in phone jacks. When confronted, they said I didn't ask for them! I could go on and on but am too tired right now. Anyway, this option might work for you? They are supposed to be super strong and you can put it together youself. I really wish I had done that, oh well:

    http://www.yurts.com/default.aspx