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I was thinking about giving it a try and wanted to know if anyone else here has any experience.
I raise worms, but as far as Vermicomposting---I am probably not in that class. I let the worms take care of alot of my rabbit poop. I got a little over 12 beds.
 

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DH has been doing vermicomposting for several years. I don't know a ton about it but would be happy to ask him any questions you have! I know he's amazed at the quality of the compost. He started with worms from Territorial Seed and now has several bins going.
 

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hillbilly in training
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I have one bin going right now, trying to figure the best way to get them through the winter. They are very easy to get started.Give it a shot.
 
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I have a worm bin. It lives in my kitchen in the Winter, and out on the screen porch during the Summer.
 

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I keep ours in the basement and they do fine year round. I bought worms a long time ago but now just have worms I caught in the garden. They do just fine.
 

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I've tried several times, and I have always ended up with lots of uneaten food and tons of white maggots. The worms don't seem to eat nearly as fast as they're supposed to. I've tried different bedding materials and have stayed away from citrus, but I always have the same problem. I guess it doesn't matter if you're vermicomposting outside, but in the house or garage, well, yuck. Wish I could solve the problem of maggots or find a good way of wintering-through outdoors.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thank you everyone for responding.
Vosey I looked into territorial seeds and they were kind of expensive.
They wanted $47.99 for 1000 worms.
I think I am gonna try Uncle Jim's Worm Farm, they have a fall special 2000 worms for $29.95.
Hopefully I can get them making some black gold compost so it helps my future veggies.
 

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I bought a pound of worms a few years ago and grew them into 12 worm bins producing about a pound or so of worms a week when they were going well. Unfortunately, due to long work hours and life complications, I ended up letting them die out. I just started up six bins again from worms from the compost pile and I"m attempting to get back up to the twelve bins again.

There's not much I can tell you that you can't find out from a quick Google search. I have them in plastic totes with air holes drilled in the lids and upper sides. I use shredded newspaper for bedding and usually feed them about once a week or whenever food is available. I've used whatever food leavings I have including coffee grounds and filters, plate scrapings from the kitchen and rabbit poo from the backyard. It's recommended not to use meat and dairy in your bins but my kitchen waste has included meat and cheese leftovers that go in just like everything else. The key here is to only put smaller portions of meat or dairy products in a a time and make sure they are fully covered. I also put in baby rabbits that didn't make it during birth and chicken and rabbit offal from butchering, although in very small quantities. Once I put in an eight week old rabbit that died in the cage just to see what happened and, although it took a long time and the bin got more moist than it should have, the entire rabbit disappeared except for the bones. I wouldn't recommend doing that on a regular basis!

For harvesting I scooped out the contents of the bins into large styrofoam meat trays and scraped off the top surface of dirt/worm poo until worms are exposed. The worms will burrow down into the pile. I would leave the trays for an hour or so then go back and scrape off another layer until worms are exposed, then go back an hour later, etc. Eventually you will have meat trays full of worms trying to burrow under each other. I would then take the worms, start a new bin and feed the chickens with some and dump the castings on the garden. I never did get to the point of making any money off them but produced a lot of nutritious material for the garden and some feed for the chickens.

I think worms here in Ontario are about $40/lb. I'll see how my free worms from my compost pile work out first!
 

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I bought a 6' galv watering trough to start one in but have not made the middle partition or plywood top yet. I put it in a 3 sided shed and thought about blocking and mortaring the bottom and putting some sort of heat lamp under the bottom for winter.
I may save it for a spring project and read how others do theirs on this thread.
 

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DH also has them in plastic totes with drilled holes. He started with shredded newspaper. Cardboard on top of the pile in the bin. Outside in the summer, garage in the winter, shed in between. He feeds them some of our kitchen scraps, we produce too much just for worms. They love fruit. No maggots. To sift he puts small piles on a tarp in the garage, covers with another tarp to bring the worms to the top and sifts the worms out with his hands.
 

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Thank you everyone for responding.
Vosey I looked into territorial seeds and they were kind of expensive.
They wanted $47.99 for 1000 worms.
I think I am gonna try Uncle Jim's Worm Farm, they have a fall special 2000 worms for $29.95.
Hopefully I can get them making some black gold compost so it helps my future veggies.
Meant to add we ordered worms from Uncle Jim's for my MIL, they were good quality and better price. We did 500 from Territorial as they are close to us for shipping time, no idea what we have now!
 

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I have raised worms for 30 years. I started raising them in the living room of my apartment with the bins disguised as coffee table and end table to provide myself with bait when I played hookie from work to sneak down to the local boat harbor for some bank fishing.

I later turned it into a part time job for 10 years to make extra pocket money until the live bait market collapsed in my area.

Now I just keep enough bins to dispose of my paper trash and kitchen scraps, make garden soil amendment and once again provide myself with bait worms.

A few dozen Eisenia fetida "red wriggler" bait worms purchased for a few bucks from a local live bait seller or E. rubbellus earth worms harvested from the wild under leaf mold or compost piles make the most affordable home composting starter herd and in a temperature between 68 and 80 degrees F. and 70% moisture will double in population every 28 days or so when properly fed.

This bin design is a good starter bin design and a home vermicompost set up can easily be stated for around $20 if you already have a paper shredder to make the bedding.

http://whatcom.wsu.edu/ag/compost/easywormbin.htm
 
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Thank you everyone for responding.

Vosey I looked into territorial seeds and they were kind of expensive.

They wanted $47.99 for 1000 worms.

I think I am gonna try Uncle Jim's Worm Farm, they have a fall special 2000 worms for $29.95.

Hopefully I can get them making some black gold compost so it helps my future veggies.

Uncle Jim sent me two batches that never showed... Even a year later. I ended up going to a local guy, who was A HOOT, and he sold me a pound of vermz.
 

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Shrek, when harvesting starter worms from an existing compost pile, how do you distinguish Eisenia Fetida from common red worms?

How did you determine how much food to give them? My maggot problem must have had to do with the amount I was feeding, because I definitely wasn't putting meat or anything strongly acid in there. Just chopped up veggies, egg shells, coffee grounds, and the like. To this day, I don't understand why they didn't want to eat.

P.S. What happened to the live bait market? Did people quit fishing?
 

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I do. Its great and a lot easier than the compost piles I've ruined over the years. I created my own bin design and started with 1/2 pound of worms mailed.
 

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I used to do it in the city, they can consume amazing amounts of waste. Took a year to fill a small tote, composting lots of scraps. They are a great way to operate through the winter indoors, no going outside to dump onto a frozen pile. No smell if you run it right, straw and shredded newspaper, rotate the corner where you put the waste.

Also you can fish with them but mine tended to be long and thin and not great bait. I like to fish with maggots personally.

I got lazy on the farm and just dump my compost in a big ol' heap now. But for indoor composting, they can't be beat!
 

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I've been considering it, I'd like another protein source for the chickens.

I've also looked at black soldier fly larvae. They're easier to harvest, but harder to keep neatly indoors as the few that escape harvesting fly when mature... Outdoors that's no big deal as the bin is the best place for them to come right back and lay eggs for the next generation...

Over wintering is the stickler...
 

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I did for years, until I left my brown plastic bin in the greenhouse one winter where the sun hit it, and cooked all my worms :(

I'd like to get my bin going again, but so far, I am too cheap to pay the outrageous prices that I see the worms selling for.
 

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hillbilly in training
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I think mine are pretty much froze to death now. I want to get a more permanent bed going that will be able to survive the winter on its own if possible. Bringing them inside would have worked, but space is at a premium in my house already.
 
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