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could some one tell me the correct markings for a Harlequin. some of them are so brightly colored and some of them the black markings make the orange look dirty.
Whick os correct?
A lady offered me some once and the buck was bright and the does were the dirty orange color.
I passed cause I didn't think that was correct.
 

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could some one tell me the correct markings for a Harlequin. some of them are so brightly colored and some of them the black markings make the orange look dirty.
I'm not sure I understand what you are referring to as "dirty", but Harlequins come in 2 varieties: Magpie (white base) and Japanese (orange base). The stripes on either variety can be black, chocolate, blue or lilac. On a dilute Japanese (blue or lilac striped) the orange base is also diluted to a more fawn colour. So a black Japanese should be bright orange, while a blue Japanese should be a more diluted (dirty??) orange.

The stripes should be clear and distinct and not mixed in with the base colour - although there is almost always SOME mingling which is called "brindling". I have yet to see a harlequin rabbit where ALL the bands and splits were as distinct black-orange as a really good dutch rabbit (which I have been told is what we are striving for). Almost every harlequin has a bit of brindling somewhere - which may also be what you are calling "dirty".

When choosing a harlequin to show, you try to minimize the brindling and maximize the number of correct colorations (ear, face, chest, feet plus body bands or bars). I often get people asking to buy a "perfectly marked harlequin". I laugh and laugh and wish I had one... or had seen one... or even had a photograph of one rather than a drawing (which is what the standard uses).

I need to update my sig blockto "Close only counts in hand grenades and harlequins" :)
 

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could some one tell me the correct markings for a Harlequin. some of them are so brightly colored and some of them the black markings make the orange look dirty.
Whick os correct?
A lady offered me some once and the buck was bright and the does were the dirty orange color.
I passed cause I didn't think that was correct.
There are many different densities in color on Harlequins. A lot of people get so wrapped up in markings that they don't pay attention to body type and density of color. As a result there are many Harlequins out there that are faded in color and that gives them a sort of a dingy dirty look. This type of color is incorrect and needs to be bred away from.

Since this is a marked breed, nothing makes a greater impact on the look than color. It sets off the markings and allows them to shine. Unfortunately in our striving for perfect markings, many breeders have kept and bred rabbits that have poor density of color and now many of them are faded and dirty looking. Black should be dark and glossy, Blue should be a nice dark almost smoky color, Chocolate should be rich and make you think of a good quality candy bar, Lilac should be a nice dark Lavender color. I like my base color to be nice and rich also. In Chocolates and Blacks I want a dark Orange color and in Blues and Lilacs I want a medium to light Orange color.

I agree that markings are important and do define the look of the breed, but those that are breeding just for markings and ignoring the rest of the rabbit are doing a grave disservice to the Harlequin. All the disqualifications on the show table are not helping either, hard to get people interested in a breed where they can't show but maybe 10% of their stock.

I breed for temperament, body, color and markings in that order.

It doesn't matter how well a Harlequin is marked if you risk life and limb trying to put your hand in its cage. I cull extremely hard for temperaments, any overtly aggressive bunny here goes into the stew pot. My girls do get a little moody when they are ready to be bred, but they are grumpy not aggressive. As soon as they get their date they are back to their usual sweet self's. My husband calls it Bunny PMS. All of my boys are super sweet and loving to the point of demanding attention.

A good body type is necessary to show off the markings to their best advantage. No half basketballs in my barn. The Harlequin should be medium in length, think oval not round, with a gentle rise from nape of neck to mid point of back and then gentle slope to the tail. This allows for a nice length of loin and plenty of room for a meaty hind quarter. It really irks me when judges try to squish and bunch up my rabbits into little balls.

Markings are icing on the cake, but they are a crap shoot. You can not control them and they do not breed true. You can breed 2 perfectly marked Harlequins and get absolutely nothing in the litter that is showable. You can breed 2 Harlequins with show table DQ's and get half a litter or more that are showable. That is why I concentrate on temperament, body and color in my lines, I can control those and work to perfect my rabbits in those areas. If I happen to get a nice showable rabbit in the litter it is a bonus. When I put it on the table I know that it has more going for it than just its markings.

Laurie
Hoppe's Harlequins & Thriantas
 

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I'm not sure I understand what you are referring to as "dirty", but Harlequins come in 2 varieties: Magpie (white base) and Japanese (orange base). The stripes on either variety can be black, chocolate, blue or lilac. On a dilute Japanese (blue or lilac striped) the orange base is also diluted to a more fawn colour. So a black Japanese should be bright orange, while a blue Japanese should be a more diluted (dirty??) orange.

I need to update my sig blockto "Close only counts in hand grenades and harlequins" :)
Even on a Dilute the Orange base should be a clear and distinct Orange color just lighter in tone than what you would see in a Black or a Chocolate.

The standard calls for a Golden Fawn color, unfortunately a more sandy fawn is usually what you see more often than not. This tends to make the rabbit look dingy or dirty looking.

Excessive brindleing can also give the appearance of a dirty look and most breeders are working on minimizing that.

Depth of color is one of the easier traits to fix. Just wish more breeders would work harder on it. It is sad to see a nicely marked rabbit that has bad color and type put up on the table. It leaves a bad impression of the breed.:(

Laurie
Hoppe's Harlequins & Thriantas
 

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HI
as for your question on dirty harlequin are you refering to an older animal that has faded out. As some animals age they fade out and you dont have the brillance of color on the animals , also sometime if you look at the pedgrees some people cross the japs and the mags and that also fades them out.


if you have the arba standard there is a description of the colors. as there the harlequin comes in 2 varities magpie( which is white) and the japaness( that is the orange) from the varities they are broke down into 4 colors
for each varity blk, blue, choc, lilac. the piece below has a descrip of the harleuqin rabbit that is also on the american harliequins web page


Harlequins are considered a medium sized breed with commercial body type. They must weigh
between 6lbs, 8 oz and 9lbs, 8oz as seniors to be shown. They should have a well-rounded,
smooth, and well filled body with medium bone.

A Harlequin's ears should split in color, with one ear the "base color" (orange/fawn or white,
depending on the group), the other ear the "marking color" (black, blue, chocolate, or lilac,
depending on the variety) from tip to base. See exapmle below:
A perfect Harlequin will have the entire head vertically divided in color, with the 2 colors meeting in
a "line" in the center of the face, between the eyes. On the ideal rabbit, the "line" where the 2
colors meet will run the full length of the face from the base of the ears to the tip of the nose, be
centered in the middle of the face, and be perfectly straight. The color on each side of the "line"
will extend all the way to the edges of the cheeks. There will be no brindling or stray intermixing of
the two colors. The "base colored" ear wil attach to the "marking colored" side of the head, and
the "marking colored" ear will attach to the "base colored" side of the head. See example below:
On a perfect Harlequin, the fore legs will split in color, and will be one continuous color from the tips of the toes up the chest to
where the neck meets the chest. The color on the forelegs and chest will alternate to the colors found on the face, so that the
"marking colored" foreleg and chest-half will be under the "base colored" side of the face, and the "base colored" foreleg and
chest half will be under the "marking colored" half of the face.

Here is a link to the harlequin webpage
http://www.americanharlequinrabbitclub.com/points.html
please feel free to look at the web page.

If you would like to see some photoes let me no as i raise and breed harlequins , satin angoras, brits, fuzzy lops and silvers ( the breed)
 
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