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Hello i want to ask what breeds of sheep come from frisa ( friesland east frisa and north frisa and the surrounding areas ). and what ones are good for wool and are hardy in the cold. also which ones are available in western Canada . thanks a lot for the help:)
 

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Have you done a search? Quite a lot of information available. East Friesians are the most common and I'm not too sure that there are any other breeds from that part of the world. The East Friesian is primarily a milking sheep but probably put up a reasonable carcass as well. During my quick search I found a crowd who owned them in Ontario.

Cheers,
Ronnie
 

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Have you done a search? Quite a lot of information available. East Friesians are the most common and I'm not too sure that there are any other breeds from that part of the world. The East Friesian is primarily a milking sheep but probably put up a reasonable carcass as well. During my quick search I found a crowd who owned them in Ontario.

Cheers,
Ronnie
Thanks for the info Ronnie . Do you mind if I ask if east Friesians are hardy , a few online places say they aren't . But I find that odd as the friesian sheep is from a cold and wet place . I think that these reports are for a Friesan sheep bred for parlours and not the original sheep. What do you think of my Idea . Thanks a lot
 

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Titan, I think your idea is good but not too sure that Friesian sheep are what you're looking for as these sheep have been bred up as milkers rather than foragers. I don't know Canada (but would love to visit) and I think it would behove you to look at other breeds to see what is going to be the best for your situation.

I live in a warm, humid climate and choose to run Romney, the reason being that although our climate is quite different to that of their (English) origins, they cope with the heat and humidity, have far less foot problems, produce good wool and a good carcass. And, just as importantly, they have a good temperament.

Don't rush into it. Do some good research, ask questions on here as the States have many more breeds than are available in NZ, look at what neighbours are running if they keep sheep. Be aware that if you keep a wool breed you either have to learn to shear or find a shearer.

Cheers,
Ronnie
 

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I live in westcan and have seen that so far the best ones for me have been suffolk and romney as Ronnie is saying. Also popular in my area are Dorper, which have a decent carcass and are hair sheep, therefor eliminating the need to shear as Ronnie also mentioned. Dorsets also are fairly hardy and provide excellent meat. Mine are actually a suffolk/romney cross and are very hardy and grow fast and big. But, I like shearing so its a plus for me.

Just a suggestion. Definitely do the research. It's worth it.

P.S. lambs for sale in the summer! lol !:D
 

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Titan, I think your idea is good but not too sure that Friesian sheep are what you're looking for as these sheep have been bred up as milkers rather than foragers. I don't know Canada (but would love to visit) and I think it would behove you to look at other breeds to see what is going to be the best for your situation.

I live in a warm, humid climate and choose to run Romney, the reason being that although our climate is quite different to that of their (English) origins, they cope with the heat and humidity, have far less foot problems, produce good wool and a good carcass. And, just as importantly, they have a good temperament.

Don't rush into it. Do some good research, ask questions on here as the States have many more breeds than are available in NZ, look at what neighbours are running if they keep sheep. Be aware that if you keep a wool breed you either have to learn to shear or find a shearer.

Cheers,
Ronnie
thanks for the reply ronney. i wanted a sheep from the place my grandpa was from in northern Netherlands and Germany but all the breeds i find are not in Canada yet . do you guys know of any sheep from that area that are good for wool and live in canada. that would be great .if not i will just get some sheep from Scotland or wales . thank alot
 

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Sorry that they are from England, but Romney is what you want. The wool is descent and they are quite hardy. I definitely appreciate wanting the kind that your Grandfather had, but as you say, most of those breeds are not in North America yet.

Where abouts in Canada are you, if you don't mind me asking. I had Dorsets in Manitoba and it seems like that is what goes around there. They originated as a cross of spanish sheep and sheep from Wales, and are also popular in Wales currently.
Dorsets are an all-purpose breed ,so they will give you nice wool and nice carcass.

Hope that helps.
 

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Sorry that they are from England, but Romney is what you want. The wool is descent and they are quite hardy. I definitely appreciate wanting the kind that your Grandfather had, but as you say, most of those breeds are not in North America yet.

Where abouts in Canada are you, if you don't mind me asking. I had Dorsets in Manitoba and it seems like that is what goes around there. They originated as a cross of spanish sheep and sheep from Wales, and are also popular in Wales currently.
Dorsets are an all-purpose breed ,so they will give you nice wool and nice carcass.

Hope that helps.
i live in northern Alberta near Edmonton . i am sad i cant get the sheep my grandpa had but Romney or Dorsets are good too . can you help me pick which one. thank alot
 

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I would say that either one would be fine. Just see what others have around there. The more locally you buy the more adapted they will already be to your environment. Try not to buy them at an auction. I know that it is cheap, but usually the animals there are exposed to all kinds of frightening illnesses and diseases that you do not want on your farm. I would look on kijiji or craigslist .

Check out these. https://www.kijiji.ca/v-livestock/edmonton/sheep-flock-for-sale/1331196609?enableSearchNavigationFlag=true

Just make sure You specify dorset.
Hope that helps
 

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Titan, look at this and tell me what you think - and then I'll tell you what I think :)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Texel_sheep

These are a Dutch bred sheep and probably the closest to what you are looking for - if you can find them in Canada. They are bred here but not so popular that they have taken over from the Romney and Perendale.

Cheers,
Ronnie
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I would say that either one would be fine. Just see what others have around there. The more locally you buy the more adapted they will already be to your environment. Try not to buy them at an auction. I know that it is cheap, but usually the animals there are exposed to all kinds of frightening illnesses and diseases that you do not want on your farm. I would look on kijiji or craigslist .

Check out these. https://www.kijiji.ca/v-livestock/edmonton/sheep-flock-for-sale/1331196609?enableSearchNavigationFlag=true

Just make sure You specify dorset.
Hope that helps
thanks alot
 

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Titan, look at this and tell me what you think - and then I'll tell you what I think :)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Texel_sheep

These are a Dutch bred sheep and probably the closest to what you are looking for - if you can find them in Canada. They are bred here but not so popular that they have taken over from the Romney and Perendale.

Cheers,
Ronnie
oh i have read about texels and i know of breeders near me but i don't know if they are hardy and have good wool as they are a meat breeds . i like them and that they are from frisa . i just dont know how there wool is , if it is good then i will get them . what do you think. thank a lot
 

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According to this, they produce good bulk wool:

http://www.nzsheep.co.nz/index.php?page=texel

They are very definitely hardy and very definitely produce a good carcass but their wool quality may not be what you're after - and somewhat belatedly, what are your plans for the wool?

I can very much appreciate your wanting to have a breed from your family homeland but sometimes these things just don't work out. I'm a 1st generation NZ'er of Welsh and Scotch descent (father Welsh, mother Scotch) but sheep from either country were not going to be viable on the other side of the world on any sort of economic scale, on top of which they were hard to come by. Romney was a good middle road - quiet temperament, good feet, good wool, good carcass and at the end of the day, might be a good place to start. There is nothing stopping you from moving on into something else at a later date.

My experience with Texal was not a good one. Because I couldn't find a pure bred Romney locally, I stupidly bought a Texal/Finn ram - and he was the Ahole from hell in more ways than one. First, he attacked my boar. Charlie Brown was a fairly laid back chap but after a couple of days of being head butted he lost the plot and put a 6" gash in the rams hind leg. Then he thought he could take on the cows and bull. I had to walk them through his paddock after milking and they ended up being terrified and wouldn't do it - except Rosie, a now 22 year old Jersey cow. He ran at her, left the ground, she caught him in the vicious horns that Jerseys have and threw him across the paddock. He decided he wouldn't come back for more. He was darned lucky that he had 6 months wool on him or he would have been dead meat. Lambing from him was a nightmare but in fairness he was Texal/Finn over Romney. The lambs were huge, wide at the shoulder and got stuck. Never again. But that aside, I didn't like his temperament one little bit and his off-spring (or at least those which I kept, which wasn't many) were as bad and didn't last long here.

But don't let that colour your decision - that's only my limited experience. If you have breeders near you it would indicate that they do well in your area - and I can imagine that they would. Looking at the Ahole (that was his name in the end), I would think they are a very hardy breed and his lambs went to the works making very good weights. I'm thinking that you are probably reasonably young and have time to play around and find what suits you best. I hope you keep on posting so that we know how you get along.

Cheers,
Ronnie
 

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According to this, they produce good bulk wool:

http://www.nzsheep.co.nz/index.php?page=texel

They are very definitely hardy and very definitely produce a good carcass but their wool quality may not be what you're after - and somewhat belatedly, what are your plans for the wool?

I can very much appreciate your wanting to have a breed from your family homeland but sometimes these things just don't work out. I'm a 1st generation NZ'er of Welsh and Scotch descent (father Welsh, mother Scotch) but sheep from either country were not going to be viable on the other side of the world on any sort of economic scale, on top of which they were hard to come by. Romney was a good middle road - quiet temperament, good feet, good wool, good carcass and at the end of the day, might be a good place to start. There is nothing stopping you from moving on into something else at a later date.

My experience with Texal was not a good one. Because I couldn't find a pure bred Romney locally, I stupidly bought a Texal/Finn ram - and he was the Ahole from hell in more ways than one. First, he attacked my boar. Charlie Brown was a fairly laid back chap but after a couple of days of being head butted he lost the plot and put a 6" gash in the rams hind leg. Then he thought he could take on the cows and bull. I had to walk them through his paddock after milking and they ended up being terrified and wouldn't do it - except Rosie, a now 22 year old Jersey cow. He ran at her, left the ground, she caught him in the vicious horns that Jerseys have and threw him across the paddock. He decided he wouldn't come back for more. He was darned lucky that he had 6 months wool on him or he would have been dead meat. Lambing from him was a nightmare but in fairness he was Texal/Finn over Romney. The lambs were huge, wide at the shoulder and got stuck. Never again. But that aside, I didn't like his temperament one little bit and his off-spring (or at least those which I kept, which wasn't many) were as bad and didn't last long here.

But don't let that colour your decision - that's only my limited experience. If you have breeders near you it would indicate that they do well in your area - and I can imagine that they would. Looking at the Ahole (that was his name in the end), I would think they are a very hardy breed and his lambs went to the works making very good weights. I'm thinking that you are probably reasonably young and have time to play around and find what suits you best. I hope you keep on posting so that we know how you get along.

Cheers,
Ronnie
I think that the Romney is the right sheep for me after I did some research last night . i am actually 12 percent give or take from England So I guess that my great grandpa might have had Romneys or like early Romney's. Thanks a lot for you help Ronnie . I will post when I get my sheep. Bye
 
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