Hard Freeze in Central CA?!?!

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by rocket, Jan 12, 2007.

  1. rocket

    rocket Well-Known Member

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    It's forecast to hit 24 here tonight. I've never seen it below 29 before. I think most of my garden will be alright, but I'm a little nervous. There's nothing to pick yet from the broccoli or peas, but maybe I'll harvest some of the lettuce and mizuna just in case. I don't think the cabbage or kale will have any problem. But the big problem is that the citrus industry stands to lose up to a billion dollars of it's crop.
     
  2. A.T. Hagan

    A.T. Hagan Guest

    You're getting the freeze we should be getting this time of year.

    Here it is the middle of January and my peppers are still producing fruit in the unprotected garden.

    .....Alan.
     

  3. rocket

    rocket Well-Known Member

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    Mmmm... peppers... LOL. The ones I pickled are just about gone.
     
  4. amwitched

    amwitched Well-Known Member

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    You could always cover your veggies. That would help protect them from the freeze. I've used leaves, blankets, sheets, old coolers, and plastic before.
     
  5. Steve L.

    Steve L. Well-Known Member

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  6. swollen tongue

    swollen tongue Well-Known Member

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    California has always had its share of freezes during Dec. and Jan. My Dad was a citrus grower of navel oranges there for over 35 years(1936 to 1972) and I know first hand what it is all about since I grew up in the middle of an orange grove. It should not be a total loss though if it goes down to 24 degrees due to micro-climates and locations in different grove areas.
     
  7. BeckyW

    BeckyW Well-Known Member

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    24 degrees? My heart almost stopped. The losses could be in the hundreds of millions of dollars. I sure hope the forecasters are wrong on this one.

    BW
     
  8. rocket

    rocket Well-Known Member

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    Well, the forecasters were wrong... it was COLDER! LOL. My thermometer read 21 on Saturday morning and 23 on both of the past two mornings. But tonight is supposed to be the last night below freezing. Luckily my garden seems fine. The Mizuna looks a bit limp after it thaws, but that's it. Maybe it was lucky that the dew point was really low (3 degrees) so there wasn't any frost.
     
  9. BeckyW

    BeckyW Well-Known Member

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    My dear friend in Atascadero called this morning (Monday) to say she returned from a weekend away and her pipes were frozen. Her neighbor told her it got down to 18 degrees.

    I just saw a yahoo headline that says California lost the entire citrus crop. And if the citrus is gone, you can bet all the avocados were lost too. This is awful. I'm stocking up on lemons tomorrow and DH told me to get a case of frozen OJ.
    BW
     
  10. james dilley

    james dilley Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Avacodos?? Don't worry theres Thousands of Acres in Texas of them things ,As well As A 10 thousand acres of citrus. So prices shoukld NOT rise that high. But then again theres those who are going to panic and cause the prices to shoot up.,I know Orchards and freezes as I used to manage A few groves years ago.
     
  11. rocket

    rocket Well-Known Member

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    I actually saw a news report saying that most citrus juice comes from Florida and most whole fruit come from California. So maybe there would be less of a price increase for juice than there would be for whole fruit?
     
  12. A.T. Hagan

    A.T. Hagan Guest

    Except that this year's citrus crop in Florida is the smallest since 1992. Fresh fruit and juice are likely to go up.

    .....Alan.
     
  13. ladycat

    ladycat Chicken Mafioso Staff Member

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    They said the damaged citrus fruit will be made into juice. The price of juice will go down, while the price of fresh fruit will go up.

    They also said most of the nation's fresh produce comes from California, and there were such massive losses that we can expect fresh produce prices to rise for a while.
     
  14. james dilley

    james dilley Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Well there are over 8 Tanker loads of Concentrated Orange juice shipped to Fla. everyday from TEXAS. And then Fla also buys thousands of tanker loads from Brazil ever year. The Nations fresh produce on the other hand. 35% comes from Cali. 20% from texas and 15% from other states like Ariz.And N M . The balance is from Costa rica and Mexico. With 5% from South America, I have hauled fresh produce from the Border region off and on for years. And the Major Juice plant is less than 8 miles from my house. So yes prices will go up. But then you need to remember that the fruits from N Y and Mich just to name 2 states will be dramaticly reduced because of abnormal weather.
     
  15. rocket

    rocket Well-Known Member

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    That's great if they can use the damaged fruit for juice! I had thought it would be a total loss.