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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Happy holidays whatever they may be be for you!

A Merry Christmas!

A Happy Hanukkah!

A Terrific Tet!

A Crazy Kwanzaa!

Or a Solemn and Stoic Ramadan.

Whatever your holiday may it be filled with Peace, Joy and Love.
 

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There are people who visit this forum who do not celebrate any religious holidays. They may find your greeting very offensive.

As for me, Happy Xmahanukwanzakah back at ya!:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
There are people who visit this forum who do not celebrate any religious holidays. They may find your greeting very offensive.

As for me, Happy Xmahanukwanzakah back at ya!:D
Good Point!

FOr those that don't have a holiday coming up Have a good month heck have a good year, heck have a good life!
 

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I know a pretty large number of atheists and agnostics and not one of them would find that offensive :p

Then again, I don't know Richard Dawkins :p

Happy Holidays, New Year, Winter Solstice, etc.!
 

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Ramadan was actually back in September. At the end of the Hajj (pilgrimage to Mecca) is the Festival of Sacrifice, though (to celebrate Abraham... the same Abraham Christians know). They sacrifice animals and feed 1/3 of the meat to the poor. That starts next Monday.

It's called Eid al-Adha in Arabic. So, "Eid Mubaarak". "Blessed holiday".

The dates move by 10 days every year, so these holidays are always moving. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Ramadan was actually back in September. At the end of the Hajj (pilgrimage to Mecca) is the Festival of Sacrifice, though (to celebrate Abraham... the same Abraham Christians know). They sacrifice animals and feed 1/3 of the meat to the poor. That starts next Monday.

It's called Eid al-Adha in Arabic. So, "Eid Mubaarak". "Blessed holiday".

The dates move by 10 days every year, so these holidays are always moving. ;)
Hey!

That is really neat! Thanks for teaching me something new! Does the Hajj change each year as well or is it always at the same time every year? If it changes what is the "kick off" event that starts it?

I know very little about Muslim holidays so I think it is super that we have a resource like you here booklover.
 

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Hey, you forgot Festivus, lol! You know, Festivus, for the rest of us? (That's got your agnostics, atheists, etc covered, CF ;) )

Don, how 'bout some nice hypnotic sedatives instead, lol. A little Lorazepam or Xanax? :D
 

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Don't forget Yule! ;)
 

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Festivus, lol! I remember that from Seinfeld. It sounded more like what my family did at Christmas, what with all the backbiting, nitpicking and whining. I was so glad when I became an adult and had the choice of whether or not to attend the family "celebration", and I use the term loosely, lol.

But yes, happy/merry/blessed/peaceful Christmas/Yule/Hannukah/Kwanzaa/Solstice/whatever-you-call-your holiday season! :)
 

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Hey!

That is really neat! Thanks for teaching me something new! Does the Hajj change each year as well or is it always at the same time every year? If it changes what is the "kick off" event that starts it?
Yes, they both move 10 - 11 days every year because they follow the Islamic (non-reformed lunar) calendar. There really isn't a kick-off (except for ceremonial prayers, I assume), just the celebrations at the end of the holidays. In Turkey they call them "Bayram", which just means holiday, I think. Since you normally eat a ton of candy at the end of the Ramadan, they call it the "sugar" holiday. :happy: Three days of gluttony following a whole month of fasting.

The sacrificial holiday, which is what is about to happen is really just a celebration of sharing and helping those in need, so it's a lot like Christian Christmas, except gifts are not exchanged.

In Turkey, at least, they SERIOUSLY celebrate the New Year, with gift exchange and everything. All over Istanbul there are "Christmas" type decorations with signs saying "Mutlu Yillar" and Santas everywhere. It's quite festive, but when we're there, I'm always quite disappointed that life is "as usual" on December 25th, and I spend the day kind of depressed knowing my family back home are all together. I usually take DVDs like "It's a Wonderful Life" and recently "Polar Express" to lift my spirits. ;)
 
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