Hanging Beef---how long?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Julia, Oct 14, 2005.

  1. Julia

    Julia Well-Known Member

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    We're getting a geriatric Holstein steer butchered next month, and I was wondering how long to let him hang after slaughter. The butcher says he lets them hang a week, but will hang the beef as long as we want. How long would get us the best flavor and texture?

    Thanks all.
     
  2. tricklecreek

    tricklecreek Well-Known Member

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    we usually let it hang 2weeks or so, better flavor and more tender
     

  3. Paula

    Paula Well-Known Member

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    We read recently in an article in SGF about grass-fed beef that said the meat is more tender if not chilled immediately after slaughter. I think it said to wait at least 2 hours before starting to chill. It also said govt.regulations :rolleyes: don't allow this so you'd have to discuss it with the slaughter house to see if they'd do it. From their explanation this should work with all beef, not just grass-fed.
     
  4. working-mom

    working-mom Registered Redneck Woman

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    We always hung ours 7-10 days in the cooler and this comes from someone whos been butchering for 40 years.

    :cowboy:
     
  5. Christiaan

    Christiaan Dutch Highlands Farm

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    If its an old steer I would guess the longer the better. When possible we hang our grass-fed beef for 21 days. There isn't a whole lot more waste than with the shorter aging times.
     
  6. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Does geriatric steer mean he is really old??
     
  7. skruzich

    skruzich Well-Known Member

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    Might mean shoe leather! :p hehe
     
  8. Tracy Rimmer

    Tracy Rimmer CF, Classroom & Books Mod Supporter

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    14 days minimum -- the longer, within reason, the more tender the beef will be.

    Tracy
     
  9. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Your description of the animal indicates to me that he may not be worth the effort of aging. To get the results that aging is capable of yeilding you need to start with an animal that has some body fat, both external and marbling. The exterior fat will reduce the shrink during the aging process, the marbling will render the flavor. I suggest that you discuss the carcass with the processor after the animal is on the meat hook. To render the most edible meat you may want to only keep the best cuts for steaks and put the balance in burger. Burger is an excellent way to prepare a questionable animal for consumption and the waste is negligible. Nearly everyone will eat burger and tenderness is not a problem once the meat is ground. I do suggest that you have the burger run through the grinder twiced to improve the blend and the texture.
     
  10. NWSneaky

    NWSneaky Well-Known Member

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    28 days or until a blue mold begins to appear. BUT, an old, tough steer will NEVER be an aged, baby beef. Another trick --- let the butcher age to his preference, wrap major cuts in vacuum pack, then age in your refrig for six-weeks.
     
  11. whodunit

    whodunit Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We have a rtestaurant in the area that ages 21 days. Their steaks are tender and have that nice tangy flavor we enjoy.