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Scotties rule!
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A year ago I had a hip replaced (I'm under 50). It didn't go as expected. I came out of surgery with severe foot drop and a leg length difference of almost an inch. I've worked very hard at rehabbing the leg. I still have no feeling in part of the leg and almost no feeling in the foot. I'm working a full time job, I care for my horses and sheep, walk my dogs, carry bags of feed, drive the tractor, do steps, and crawl up and down ladders. I thought I was doing well. Get along fine on level ground. I'm very careful on rough ground and I know I limp going uphill.

The other day, a good friend pointed out that my Collie would make a good service dog. I didn't know where so she was going with that statement, so I asked her. She said that I could use the Collie as a service dog. She knows all the things I do and thinks I'm handicapped. I'm having a real hard time wrapping my head around the idea of being "handicapped". I know I won't be breaking any more horses and will never bungie jump but hadn't thought of myself as "handicapped".

What is handicapped??

Kathie
 

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Premium Member
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9,235 Posts
From a practical ... or legal ... standpoint, I think "handicapped" can mean anyone who has any sort of limitation that makes doing some things more difficult for them to do than for the majority of people.

Otherwise, I've always tended to think that "handicapped" was more a way of thinking than anything else.

I grew up with a second cousin who contracted polio in his 20s and lived the rest of his life running a ranch, driving vehicles and tractors AND flying a plane being able to walk only with braces and crutches and confined otherwise to a wheelchair. I don't know that he considered himself handicapped, only that he had to do some things differently than other people.

An injury left me with no usable vision in one eye, I am no longer able to drive safely and there are some things I no longer do well ... and some things I don't do at all now ... and I'm sure I could be considered handicapped as well. I don't think of myself as handicapped, though ... I just do some things slower or differently than other people.

Maybe because I'm only 5' tall and have always had to figure out ways to do things that taller people could do easily ... and never thought of myself as being handicapped because of being short ... I've adjusted more quickly to other limitations.
 

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Be powerful. No other option exists.
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38,811 Posts
It's just a word! :)
 

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Premium Member
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I contracted polio 61 years ago, next month, and I have dealt with that word a good part of my life. Fortunately it has replaced the word "crippled". Now that I'm dealing with post polio syndrome, I'll say this:

You're as handicapped as you wish to be!

With a bit of imagination, there are ways to get around any disability.
 

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Miniature Horse lover
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25,219 Posts
Yes it is just a word, even though I have severe RA I still can have fun with my mini horses although I am "technically" handicapped, I even have one of those "special" cards that I can hang on the mirror and use the handicapped parking places I very seldom use it as there are people much worse off then me. But being on SS Dis. I am "handicapped"
 

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I have been labeled "disabled" for about 10 years now. I have severe RA also. I also have a service dog and special tag for my car. My disability is very hidden in the sense that I don't look disabled. The only thing that really marks me is my dog. But, if I didn't have my dog - I'd be in a wheel chair. My dog gently pulls me along as I walk. Once we get the momentum going, he keeps it going which takes the pressure off my knees, etc. I don't have to push off as hard as I walk. He is really great at getting me up hill!

He also gets me up off the floor - but it ain't a pretty sight. He is my stablizer when I lean over. He gets things for me. He even takes the laundry to the machine for me. He is also an alerting dog which means he is capable of telling me when I have done too much and it is time to stop!

And so, I can weed the garden, tend the chickens, clean the house, etc. and not be totally exhausted at the end of the day.

So, yeah, you may qualify for the legal definition of being "disabled" but it is only a word. All it means is that you can use all kinds of special things to make your life easier without someone telling you "YOU can't do that HERE!"
 

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If I need a Shelter
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21,532 Posts
I've been disabled for years.Just have to do things in spurts and have to watch it I don't do too many spurts.

If anything happens and my Dogs are around they are at a total loss but stay there with me.

big rockpile
 
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