hand washer wringers...

Discussion in 'Countryside Families' started by tinetine'sgoat, Jan 2, 2007.

  1. tinetine'sgoat

    tinetine'sgoat Luvin' my family in MO

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    I am seriously considering getting a hand washer to use to conserve on the life of my electric washer and to save money on water etc... Questions are how long does it take to do a load, how big are loads compared to the settings on a regular machine, does it really conserve on water, do the clothes really come out clean. I would like to have it so that I use my regular machine on days that we are really pressed for time, and use it the other days. Also the cheapest I have found for a new one is around 400 bucks, does anyone know of a cheaper place to get them. I'm scared to get an antique because of leaks, rust etc...
     
  2. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The electric wringer washers save water because you use the same water over and over until you have finished the days wash. We used to heat a tub of water on the wood stove and bucket it to the washer, then fill the two rinse tubs from the pump with cold water. They always got the floor wet from dribbled or slopped water, not from leaks. Most people washed in a wash room or outside if the weather was fit. A hand opperated one workes the same way, except you have to stand there and furnish the power to aggitate the clothes. The simplest one was the rock-a-bye. You put the water soap and clothes in the bottom with a wood slatted cradle that was put down on top and rocked back and forth to rub the clothes. I think I am correct when I say No woman preferred a hand powered washer.

    Unless you could find someone who you could get to do the work for the waist thinning exercise.
     

  3. tinetine'sgoat

    tinetine'sgoat Luvin' my family in MO

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    waist thinning......hhhmmmm....sounding more appealing all the time~~ :p
     
  4. chickenmommy

    chickenmommy nosey, but disinterested Supporter

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    I had one that agitated for as long as you let it and had electric ringers on the top. That was a step up from my scrub board. I think the scrub board got the socks cleaner. Both are a lot of work and I really think the washers of today would have to do a better job. Hey, maybe that's one of the reasons I was so much thinner then. Oh and I bet the lack of wood heat has something to do with the added girth also!
     
  5. Ruby

    Ruby Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have to disagree with todays doing a better job. My clothes always came out cleaner when I had a wringer washing machine. I would love to have another one. Just can't find a used one, and can't afford the new ones. They will agitate as long as you let them. Then run the clothes through the wringer into the rinse water. You can rinse more soap out of the clothes when you do it your self than the automatic ones do.
     
  6. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    They sell used wringer washers at the Amish auctions in Topeka Indiana. Most are run with a gas engine. I agree about them doing a better job. We always used two rinse tubs. The clothes went from the washer into the first tub, then the wringer was swung around to run them from the first to the second tub. From there they were rung into the clothes basket. By the time you got back from the clothes line, the next batch was ready to rinse.
    A thing that took watching was having no clothing are voluptious body parts that could get into the wringer. You may have already heard an expression concerning this.
     
  7. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    Hey, I’ll let this wringer “like new” wringer go for well under that $400 price tag you mentioned. All you have to do is pick it up in Minnesota.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  8. tinetine'sgoat

    tinetine'sgoat Luvin' my family in MO

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    Cabin, if you are serious I am interested. You can pm details if you would rather. Road trips are good for the soul! :)
     
  9. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

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    I've never used a Hand washer.I have used a Electric Wringer Washer.They Pop Buttons if you don't watch what your doing.

    Cabin thats a good Washer you have there,easy to put a Gas motor on if you want.

    big rockpile
     
  10. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Those old square tub Maytags were the best washing machine ever built. Ours came with a little Maytag gas engine that powered it. The engine had a long flex hose to run the exhaust out doors. We switched it over to an electric motor when they run electricity out into the country.

    Cabin, yours looks better than any of the old ones I remember.
     
  11. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    tinetine'sgoat: I sent you a PM.