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Discussion Starter #1
Hi folks,

I'm getting ready to put in a well. Around here most wells are 250'. I'd like to put in a hand pump, that I can eventually hook to a windmill. I won't know what the static water level will be until I drill, and that will determine the amount of pipe and rod I need, but I know I need a deep water pump (even if the static level is 100')

A new hand pump from a place in Colorado will run me around $650 (pump head only, no pipe or cylinder) from a place in Colorado, and it's the same cast iron design made for a hundred years. But old well heads can be had on eBay for less than $100. I believe I can get a new cylinder, pipe and rod.

How can I tell if an old well pump is able (if operating to specs) to draw water from that depth? Does it have to do with the pump stroke length? Is it reasonable to buy an old one if I check the casting, or is this a false economy?

Thanks for your help!

- Willow
 

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We have a deep well hand pump. Really, all the deep well pump is a lever. So, the most important part is the handle. The housing can be cracked and it will still work as long as the lever (the handle) goes up and down. If I were buy a used deep well hand pump I would check the condition of its pipe threads were the pump rod attaches, as well as the pipe threads where the drop tube (water supply tube) attaches. You want to make sure that the threads in both of these locations are not rusted away or cross-threaded.
 

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When you say deep well pump, I take that to meen that the cylinder is deep into the well and the pump, above ground, part pulls the rod that is inside the connecting pipe. I would say that the lever or handle and spout is the least important part. The cylinder is the important part. Get a good brass cylinder in a diameter that will fit into your new well. As far as stroke, the longer stroke will get you more water than a shorter one, but won't help when the windmill is hooked up. Windmills generally have a fixed stroke, anything beyond that is wasted. The cylinder needs to by under the water level far enough that you can't pump the water out faster than it runs in. A slow flowing well requires you place the cylinder deeper because the water in the well is a sort of resevour. A fast flowing or refilling well allows you to place the cylinder closer to the top. Less pump rod, less lift pipe, less effort.
The old well heads may not have a seal where the rod comes out the top, so you can't preasurize or pump water above the head. If that doesn't matter, I'd go with an old one. Some Health Departments might require a seal on the top for drinking water. If you can afford it, get a good cylinder, if not at least put in new leathers.
 

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....I believe I can get a new cylinder, pipe and rod....
Haypoint, you are right about the cylinder being important. I was under the impression that she was looking to buy only the hand pump and purchase a new cylinder.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Very good point about the top seal to prevent anything from the surface getting in the well. I don't want that, regardless of what the health dept requires!

I'll also be sure to check all the threads. Now you've pointed it out it seems obvious, but it didn't even occur to me. Thanks for the suggestions.

I'm looking for a new cylinder because the old well heads don't seem to have them included. This mechanism is simple enough I think I can figure it out --I take it the "leathers" are a gasket of some kind?
 

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Are you looking to only use the hand/windmill pump, or for a time anyhow also an electric deep well pump?

You would need a big enough well casing for both should you want both.

--->Paul
 

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Discussion Starter #7
When I get the electric system up (place is off grid and windy, so the plan is a modern wind generator with backup solar charging batteries with an Outback inverter), I'll pull the manual and switch to a low-volume electric pump and fill an elevated water tank to provide water pressure to the house.

For the elevated tank I'll need to move some earth, as the farm is flat, coastal fields.

However there's a Bison brand stainless manual pump says it allows you to have the electric in there at the same time -- electric at a lower elevation.

Is there a reason to get a well casing larger than 4"? Does the diameter of the well casing effect the static height of the water column?
 

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agmantoo
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The well casing impacts the storage area and not the static level. A 6 inch well seems to have come the norm for all good wells in my area. I do not even know anyone who has a 4 inch rig. There are some developers that will bring in an outside crew and still put in a bored well in a few low end mobile home sites for the unsuspecting, less aware future owners. Cramming more than a 4 inch submersible setup in a casing could lead to problems with the wiring rubbing the casing since you cannot use the standoffs to hold the wire centered to the casing. Should the electric pump have to be serviced the entire manual pump would have to be removed first. I think I would just consider a solar pump with the storage tank. Use sleeved wiring, taped to the drop pipe, plus a torque arrestor with the plastic standoffs regardless. Otherwise, the starting torque can wear the insulation from the pipe as the wire is scrubbed against the casing inner wall.
 
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