Hand activated siphon pump

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by moopups, Apr 20, 2006.

  1. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    In beautiful downtown Sticks, near Belleview, Fl.
    I can't find one locally, so am considering building my own, its needed to siphon out horse water tubs for cleaning. They are 20 gallon and a bit too heavy these days to drag around. I'm thinking a PVC shaft with a flapper valve at the bottom, a second flapper valve at a 'side mounted T'. The suction plunger will be turned wood with an 'O' ring, the plunger handle a threaded rod. The side mounted T will be placed slightly above the tubs rim, a drain hose attached to remove the water safely out of the horse stall.

    In the past here the horse attendants just dumped the water tubs into the stalls, and they wondered why there was so much hoof problems.
     
  2. wilderness1989

    wilderness1989 Well-Known Member

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    Effingham, Illinois 5b
    Take a hose and put it in the container and let it fill completely with water. Put your thumb over one end so NO water runs out and keep the other end in the tank under water :cowboy: . Move the thumb end to lower than the tank while making sure the tank end stays under water. Take your thumb off and the water should flow if you didn't break the seal .
     

  3. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    In beautiful downtown Sticks, near Belleview, Fl.
    Unfortulantly Florida is so flat that regular siphoning does not work well here; besides there is sand, hay, and other trash in the tubs, it soon blocks the hose. Hence the need for a bigger orface for the water to flow within.
     
  4. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

    Messages:
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    Joined:
    May 12, 2002
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    In beautiful downtown Sticks, near Belleview, Fl.
    Got it made and it works, changed the layout to include a vertical pair of lengths of 1 & 1/2" PVC. At the bottom is a check valve - or more correctly, a backflow prevention valve. The water flows upward to a "T" that is adapted to connect with a garden hose, just above the highest point of the tub rim, then off to a waste water area. An upper length of PVC ends at the top with an air valve (ball valve), the upper valve is opened, the contraption is then pumped (like a plunger) into the water; water comes up to exit at the top of the vent valve, at that time I close the ball valve; all water in the vertical area above the hose 'T' is then sent out the adaptation connection, via siphon action.