Ham Steak.....

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by Up North, Apr 23, 2006.

  1. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    Last week I was wrangling the 2 and 3 year old munchkins while Heather filled grocery cart. Looking in the meat counter, they had a Ham Steak about 5/8" thick and big enough to cover a 12" dinner plate.
    A beautiful Ham Steak.....or maybe not. In the lower portion of the shrink wrap package it said in large, clear letters: Injected with 23% solution of sodium and water. Underneath that was the name of an unnamed multination al food conglomerate. I was disgusted, saddened, and angry all at once!
    The pricing label said $3.99/lb. The quick math says that if 23% of the product is water and sodium, 23% of $3.99 is 92 cents of every pound purchased is for this "SOLUTION" . As we raise all our own beef, pork, poultry meats, I found this offensive.
    I guess that's a good reason to raise your own or find a farmer you can buy product direct from. No need to reach us in search of pigs or pork - we're sold out till sometime in August. Just venting that big food companies take advantage of food buyers so blatantly.
     
  2. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    And the NAIS wants to keep it that way. More profit for the monster conglomerates who find food profitable and could care less for health or terrorist threats.... have you purchased chicken lately? It should be labeled "BIOHAZARD."
     

  3. ihedrick

    ihedrick Can't stop thinkin'

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    I remember the first time I cooked bacon from our first hog. The kids turned their nose up at it; cying it didn't look like the stuff from the store. Once we explained the reasons why store food looks different (all the addatives, flavors, preservatives, etc), they haven't complained.
     
  4. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    Hi Tango, hope you are doing ok.

    Right, the conglomerates are exempt from the NAIS regs. They get "lot numbers" instead of having to track every individual animal. As the small scale producers get squeezed out we will become ever more reliant on the conglomerate inbred essentially cloned animals. When some disease pops up that can kill one of those animals, the whole herd will die off. Without us little farmers provideing the genetic diversity the NAIS regs will increase th risk of Famine. Maybe that is what some people in government are counting on. Famine would quickly lead to anarchy and then martial law. BTW, Ive noticed anytime I mention NAIS in a post here, I cant log back on starting the next day for 2-20 days. So if I don't reply it is likely I can't log on again. It happens so reliably, that I'm convinced there is some sort of software problem that causes it, likely the result of an ingenious hacker, working for whom, I don't know.


     
  5. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    Hi George,
    Doing good here. My surgeon released me last Wednesday; will be four weeks tomorrow. Starting to work with my livestock again which makes me happy :)
     
  6. JElfering

    JElfering Dairy Dreamer

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    Up North - How close are you to me (we're NE WI)? I wanted the pigs for the 4H child to show but you're sold out. However, you mentioned this August you'll have more. That will be cutting it close with winter but I would still be interested with all the milk we'll have around here. This is the first year for us to butcher. We'll be starting with a jersey steer in July or September.
     
  7. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    Depends on your definition of NE WI. LOL. If you have been in area long, you will understand when I say we are just west of the Apple festival. We have two litters of pigs due in June, so if all goes well, we will have feeder pigs available in August of a reasonable size. WE usually keep them on sow till they are 40 lbs or more to give them a better start. Pigs are scarce in the area, which is why we got into farrowing and bought a boar as well. You may have to look to the south to find 4H pigs to meet timeframe. Oh, if you want Hogs butchered and processed locally, you have to book them 5-6 months in advance either for Mellen or Ashland. A new option has opened up as Trucker in Glidden will haul them to Medford and have them done on short notice. Best luck finding some for the 4H.
     
  8. BobK

    BobK Well-Known Member

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    The 23% in this case is referencing the concentration of sodium in the solution....not the mass of the amount injected.
     
  9. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    Bob I.m a farmer not a food chemist. If you are right or not I don't know - either way I don't want to eat it or pay for it,LOL.
     
  10. Oxankle

    Oxankle Well-Known Member

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    In either case, I object to the butcher selling me water when I want to buy meat. The SOB's sell factory meat that is tasteless and dry, then inject it with salt water and charge you meat price for water.

    Have you noticed the strong similarity between the taste of factory-farmed pork chops and cardboard?

    We raised our own pigs this winter and the wife cannot believe that the meat is so much better than that she was bringing home from Walmart.
    Ox
     
  11. BobK

    BobK Well-Known Member

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    if you send your hams off to be cured chances are they will be cured by a vacuumed brined method where a brine is injected into your pork...and you pay the guy to do this!

    I completely agree with taking umbrage at paying for water...some hams are sold with a percentage by weight of water added...and of course OUR pork is the best in the world...sorry to burst you guys bubble....
     
  12. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    not sure where you've done that :shrug: We don't take our pork to a butcher and we don't cure or smoke or anything. Hams to us, mean pernil, aka fresh hams, no solutions, no junk. No comparison to anything, least of all the stuff that passes for pork at a supermarket.

    I do think it is a step back to raise livestock for one's family then let it enter the human food chain at a commercial establishment that will add a bunch of seasonings and chemicals. When we first raised a heritage turkey I was concerned that it would be tough so I asked for input from others and was told to soak it in a brine solution. That made no sense whatsoever. We've gotten used to the flavor of foods again, learned how to butcher humanely and prepare purely for health, and voila! good food. I don't eat meat anymore but I still emphasize a whole approach to food for my family and guests. Just cause one raises it at home, I suppose doesn't really mean much if the stuff that ends up on your family's plate is different version of the same junk.
     
  13. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    It's also very expensive to be paying someone else to do your butchering. That is one of the places that home farm operations go into the red. Pay for the animal, Pay for the feed, Pay for the processing...it all adds up. We paid a total of 100 bucks for or first breeding pair, a few years later 50 bucks for a new sow. Fifty bucks a month on corn, and have provided meat for 5 (3 teenagers) for the last 6 years
     
  14. BobK

    BobK Well-Known Member

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    GeorgeK...your sure right on that count....butchering,cutting, wrapping, and any curing can easily add well over a $100 bucks to the cost......homebutcher here for sure!! I so send some hams, shanks, and bacons out to a local guy simply because he does such a fantastic job of curing the meat it made no sense for me to cure my own.....we use most of our pork fresh in various forms....

    Brines are a very useful tool in cooking...don't discount the process...
     
  15. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    Bob thanks for your weighing in on this one. I guess I will ask&learn what all is involved with process next time we have hams, bacon, and hocks smoked.
    It is not only water I object to in store bought products, but are all those "Nitrates" really necessary if meat is properly handled prepared, and frozen in a clean facility?
     
  16. BobK

    BobK Well-Known Member

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    Nitrates can be left out but you need to get used to eating and looking at grey...or is that gray... meat.....it tastes fine but it doesn't have the appealing look...and you'll probably have to learn to cure it yourself since it might be hard to find someone to take the gamble on curing without nitrates.....its not impossible but start small since its easy to ruin a bunch of meat. While I know its a revolting idea you can buy cuts of pork on sale at the store to practice on...try both brine and dry cures but take it easy on how much meat you commit to the project.