Hackberry trees-how to get rid of?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by mary,tx, Mar 22, 2008.

  1. mary,tx

    mary,tx Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    4,628
    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2002
    I read through the Locust tree post, and found them very interesting.
    We have nasty thorn trees in the pastures, too, several kinds.

    But how about hackberries? Do any of y'all have solutions for killing them, especially in the flower beds? They love to grow right in the middle of rose bushes and such. I cut them back time and again, but don't know how to keep them from regrowing.

    mary
     
  2. BaronsMom

    BaronsMom Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,274
    Joined:
    May 22, 2005
    I have the same problem. I have two beautiful hackberry trees in my side yard (had three until a tornado took it).

    Benefits:
    ***They provide the entire east hide of my house with shade.
    ***Beautiful tree form - my trees are huge - at least 60 years old, but at the end of their lives.
    ***Hackberry trees are native to this area and provide important food for birds and wildlife. During spring migration, the trees are full of birds eating the tiny green fruit.
    (these two things outweigh any of the downsides)

    Downside:
    ***Messy, messy, messy - sticks, twigs
    ***Hackberry galls on the leaves - unslightly (oh well)
    ***Hackberry gall psyllids (little annoying bugs that come out of the galls, don't bite - just annoy)
    ***Hackberry lace bugs (another annoying bug that just annoys)
    ***All those seeds the birds poop out or fall off the trees sprout really well. (Can't we make money off these trees???)

    I have the most problems with hackberry trees sprouting in my flowerbeds that have mulch.

    - I pull the little buggers out - as soon as I can - but I have so many flowerbeds/gardens
    - The ones I miss, I cut down below the soil line - but they come back tougher/stronger.
    - In one flowerbed, I also use the products you sprinkle on top of the soil and it keeps weeds from germinating (Preem?). It seems to work to keep new little trees from sprouting. But tough when the seeds drop down into my wood mulch.
    - I've thought about putting a little Round-up in a can and using a paintbrush to paint the Round-up on the little trees I cut off. I just can't spray Round-up in my garden, would kill my roses and perennials. May try that this year.
     

  3. Tricky Grama

    Tricky Grama Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    31,762
    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2006
    Location:
    N. E. TX
    One suggestion I read was to cut them low then stick a tin can over the remaining root. Push it into the ground. It would be hard for me to do this b/c the darn things have gotten such a huge 'stem' area that most cans won't fit! Plus my flower garden would really look good FULL of tin cans. But if you have a smaller section maybe it would work.

    Patty
     
  4. Sand Flat Bob

    Sand Flat Bob north central Texas

    Messages:
    300
    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2007
    Location:
    Texas
    You are on the right track, we have hackberries also. Instead of Roundup, us 24-D full strength on the freshly cut stem. I use foam brushes, have to be careful as any flowers you get the 24-D on will be killed. Of course, roundup will also, but 24-D is more effective in killing the hackberry trees. This will work on much larger trees also, just coat the entire cut area with 24-D.

    Good luck,

    Bob
     
  5. BaronsMom

    BaronsMom Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,274
    Joined:
    May 22, 2005
    oooh - good idea. I can get some 2-4D from my dad. I rarely buy it just because of the "drift". (and not too worried about killing dandelions and such)

    I couldn't use the tin can method. Like you, Tricky Grama, I have too many of the little trees popping up - I don't think I even have enough tin cans to put over them.

    It must take a fair amount of moisture for the seeds to sprout. I never have any trying to take root under the trees themselves, in the grassy area. Just in the mulched flower beds.

    Thanks!
     
  6. texican

    texican Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,325
    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2003
    Location:
    Carthage, Texas
    Can you still buy 2-4d? I thought it had been banned because it kills everything?

    If you do decide to use it, make sure you're through childbearing. And don't allow children, or pets, or anything else you don't want to die, from ever going near the soil again.

    The better a poison works on things, the better it works on humans too.

    Pull it out. Tie up a goat. Deleaf it. No tree can survive forever on just roots... without leaves, it'll eventually die.

    My mother hated roaches. She had the house sprayed regularly. Didn't work. She got a friend of a relative to come out and spray his special cocktail, and shazam it WORKED!!! Mom died a few years after that, from a host of pesticide induced cancers...

    I'd rather have roaches and my mother, than no roaches and no mother!!!
     
  7. sage_morgan

    sage_morgan Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    496
    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2005
    Location:
    Roughly where IA, NE and SD come together, on the
    Texican, I'm sorry to hear this about your mom. *cringe*

    I want to relate a tree story. We got some freebie red oaks from an extension something-or-another about 9 years ago. We planted two trees together in each of four locations, thinking that half of the trees would die. Nope. They all lived.

    The next problem is that if you let two trees grow up together 1 inch apart they soon become a problem tree, even if they are oaks. We considered many things, including poison, but what would poison the trees we didn't want, would also poison the tree we did want.

    A botanist friend said "Defoliate-em." Why didn't I think of that???

    (I'd had a little girl kill a baby cottonwood of mine a few years ago, about 5 ft tall it was, and that's exactly how she did it: she idly stripped the leaves, just once, and it died.)

    And that's what we did. We examined which of the paired trees we wanted, and defoliated the runt. We did that about three times last summer and it made a big difference in the growth of the runt. I think another summer may kill off the runts and allow the remaining trees to grow strong and straight.

    These trees were about 9 years old, and up to 10 feet tall. The growth of different trees are ... different, but defoliation works.
     
  8. ksfarmer

    ksfarmer Retired farmer-rancher

    Messages:
    2,994
    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2007
    Location:
    north-central Kansas
    Tordon RTU. When you cut off the tree sprout, paint the stump with the Tordon. Works every time.
     
  9. Tricky Grama

    Tricky Grama Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    31,762
    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2006
    Location:
    N. E. TX
    So sorry about your Mom, especially since it could very well have been the roach poison.

    This is why I don't use roundup or any thing other than natural methods. And its why I still have those darn hackberries comin' up in my garden!! But you are right-if I cut 'em off enuf, they'll die. (I just think I'll prolly go 1st :) )
     
  10. mary,tx

    mary,tx Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    4,628
    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2002
    I know that just cutting the tree down will not do it. They continually send up new shoots, and they grow fast. They just aren't as easy to kill as other things are.