H2o2

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by heelpin, May 26, 2004.

  1. heelpin

    heelpin Well-Known Member

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    Super-enriching your water with oxygen is a very simple process. All it requires is adding one(1) pint hydrogen peroxide to one(1) gallon water, shake well(vigorously for about five(5) seconds), and allow it to sit over night. The reason this enriches the water with oxygen is simple. Water is two hydrogen atoms and one oxygen atom, H2O. Hydrogen peroxide is H2O2, or water with an extra atom of oxygen. When H2O2 is added to H2O, the extra atom in the hydrogen peroxide attaches itself to bacteria and impurities in the water, thereby disinfecting it. After most impurities have been eliminated, you are left with a water-hydrogen peroxide mix. When added to your plants the extra oxygen in the hydrogen peroxide attaches to the roots, helps increase nutrient uptake, and increases plant growth by 30%.
     
  2. stumpyacres

    stumpyacres Well-Known Member

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    BUTTTTTTTT what about the good nitrogen fixing bacteria?????HMMM
     

  3. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

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    I wonder if this changes the hydrogen peroxide enough that it does not kill bacteria anymore?? :confused:
     
  4. heelpin

    heelpin Well-Known Member

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    Bacteria are single-celled organisms, and are the most numerous denizens of the soil, with populations ranging from 100 million to 3 billion in a gram. They are capable of very rapid reproduction by binary fission (dividing into two) in favourable conditions. One bacterium is capable of producing 16 million more in just 24 hours. Most soil bacteria live in close proximity to plant roots and are often referred to as rhizobacteria. Bacteria live in soil water, including the film of moisture surrounding soil particles, and some are able to swim by means of flagella. The majority of the beneficial soil-dwelling bacteria need oxygen (and are thus termed aerobic bacteria), whilst those that do not require air are referred to as anaerobic, and tend to cause putrefaction of dead organic matter. Aerobic bacteria are most active in a soil that is moist (but not saturated, as this will deprive aerobic bacteria of the air that they require), and neutral soil pH, and where there is plenty of food (carbohydrates and micronutrients from organic matter) available. Hostile conditions will not completely kill bacteria; rather, the bacteria will stop growing and get into a dormant stage, or may mutate to adapt to the new conditions. Gram positive bacteria produce spores in order to wait for more favourable circumstances, and Gram negative bacteria gets into a "nonculturable" stage.
     
  5. Jimmy Mack

    Jimmy Mack Well-Known Member

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    never used the hydrogen peroxide, but do use some air stones and an air pump to oxygenate water for houseplants in a 5 gallon carboy. It appears to make the plants more vigorous.

    viva la EDAPHON!!!
     
  6. stumpyacres

    stumpyacres Well-Known Member

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    "Whilst" Man where did you copy that from? I still don't buy it - it will neutralize all of the good "stuff" going on!
     
  7. Jimmy Mack

    Jimmy Mack Well-Known Member

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    Here's a cut 'n paste from Peaceful Valley Farm Supply, www.groworganic.com...

    "Hydrogen peroxide is added to foliar feeding solutions, fertigation, irrigation, etc., to improve oxygen levels. Higher oxygen levels improve the plant's ability to take up any available nutrients. It is best to use an ORP Meter (see Monitoring Tools section) to determine available oxygen in the solution you are using. Application rates vary widely but start at 4 oz/100 gal of treated water. Severe problems may require up to 32 oz. Our hydrogen peroxide is food grade 35% H2O2 and should not be confused with the H2O2 sold in drug stores, which is only 3% and contains preservatives. 35% H2O2 (a hazardous material) is very potent and can burn on contact with the skin."

    BTW, hydropgen peroxide is OMRI approved. Application rates and concentration of h202 make a difference per SOP.