Guinea Hogs

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by tbishop, Dec 6, 2004.

  1. tbishop

    tbishop Well-Known Member

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    Hello all. Well, after the complications with the wild hogs (legalities and such) I began to look at different "small" hog breeds. I've been fortunate enough to have found a pair of guinea hogs that are for sale. They are last year's breeder piglets (his words). Does anyone have any idea what these pigs are worth? I have no clue and don't want to waste his time if they are out of my price range. Any help would be appreciated.

    Tim
     
  2. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    Hi Tim, Guineas are a rare breed so I would think they would be very pricey- to the tune of a few hundred per. Purebreds are uncommon in homestead situations though. They are found in zoos or private collections. Mixed breeds are more common. In fact, Florida wild pigs are mixed with Guinea blood. A few of mine look very much like Guinea hogs. Mixed breeds are probably more affordable. I don't have any references but I would think a mixed Guinea piglet would not be much more than a domestic one. Good luck.
     

  3. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

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    http://www.ansi.okstate.edu/breeds/swine/
    Breeds of Livestock - Swine Breeds

    I know nothing about pigs. Maybe this will help. They're listed as critical with the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy.
     
  4. Laura Workman

    Laura Workman (formerly Laura Jensen) Supporter

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    Hi Tim, I've heard prices on these guys that sounded quite reasonable for homestead breeding stock, and then I've heard other prices that are really high. Frankly, it seems odd to me that someone would price a critically rare breed prohibitively high, since that only discourages using them the way they are meant to be used. But that's my own soapbox, and I'll get down now.

    There's a fellow named Randy Setty (in Ohio?) who is extremely interested in preserving this breed, and his prices are very reasonable as I recall. Let me know if you'd like contact information for him, and I'll look it up. And if you're ever travelling out to Washington and want to bring a couple of Guinea Hogs with you, I'd love to get some.
     
  5. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    Hi Laura you make sense and I completely agree with that rationale. It is interesting as a discussion point because one would think that wold be the reason for breeding rare stock. My personal experience shopping for rare breeds (I never found purebred Guinea Hogs in Florida when I looked btw) has been different though. I found that people with rare breeds can be choosy about who they sell to and what qualifications and plans the buyer has. They've usually invested a lot of blood, sweat, tears, and money to manage their stock- the fewer bloodlines available the pricier the stock is and the choosier sellers are. I've even been given stipulations about not butchering stock ;) Only when the rare breed stops being rare do prices come down to the point many of us can buy stock and afford to have them as livestock rather than curiousity. At that time the buyer must be careful about genetic problems caused by inbreeding, imo, so it's a different ball of wax. Mr. Setty has piglets priced from $150- $200 - not bad - but not priced like the usual $25- $60 piglets of domestic stock. Just my 2 cents in the spirit of discussion.
     
  6. Laura Workman

    Laura Workman (formerly Laura Jensen) Supporter

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    Yeah, I thought I remembered Mr. Setty charging somewhere around $100, but it's been a while and I could have old information. That didn't seem that high, since weaners around here go in the $55 to $60 range, and potbellies are typically a couple of hundred. :eek: I got lucky enough to find a local woman who sells her potbelly babies for the low, low price of $35! :D

    As for the rare breeds, I guess it makes sense to be extra careful where they go when there are only a few. I guess if they're all being bought at the higher prices, then everything possible is already being done to preserve the breed and I can stick with the lower priced animals with a clear conscience! :)
     
  7. tbishop

    tbishop Well-Known Member

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    Well this gentleman is much closer than Mr. Setty. I'm going to speak with him on Thursday- I'll let y'all know how it goes. Thanks for all the help!!!

    Tim
     
  8. JAS

    JAS Well-Known Member

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    Hi tbishop

    I think there is a couple that have guinea hogs near Astoria, SD. Last I hear they were breeding and selling piglets. If you are interested I could try and get more information. My vet. is their vet. and he thought the prices were reasonable (not sure what that is).
     
  9. tbishop

    tbishop Well-Known Member

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    What a coincidence! I just found a website with a breeder from Astoria, SD listed last night! If this doesn't work out, then I'll definitely get in contact with them. Thanks!!

    Tim
     
  10. JAS

    JAS Well-Known Member

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    Did they have a web site or just listed as a breeder on another? I am more interested in their Boer goats so would like to see what they have :)
     
  11. tbishop

    tbishop Well-Known Member

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    It was just the address listed. I saved it on my home computer, so I'd be more than happy to send they address to you when I get home tonight from work.

    Tim
     
  12. Unregistered

    Unregistered Well-Known Member

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    What, if any would be the advantages of the guinea or the potbelly over the more meat producing breeds? The hog has the highest percentage of meat to live weight but if there is a larger amount of scrap (fat) it would seem you loose that advantage. Both the guinea and the potbelly has a large amount of fat that nowdays amounts to scrap. The larger meat breeds can be fed out and slaughtered before the guinea and potbelly gets near size to slaughter. The amount of lean meat in the meat breeds would be greater than the guinea or potbelly on the same amount of feed in a shorter time.
    Can some one with experience please explain the difference?
     
  13. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    Adult size is one difference but you have a valid consideration concerning the Guinea hog. I'll explain. Potbelly Pigs, Guinea hogs, and wild pigs all grow to about 1/3 of the size of a domestic. Not all families need the 250 market weight goal of a domestic. For my small family the carcass was a huge pain to deal with and the meat lasted forever, long after our favorite portions were gone. A smaller pig answers the needs of a smaller homestead or the needs of one person working. They are easier to manage. The meat is exquisite in the case of the wild pig (you can't compare with a domestic) and they are lean pigs. No fat. There are very few inherited health problems or complications, and they are very managable for one person. I don't have any rush to grow a pig of mine either. I enjoy raising them. I'm not keeping one eye on the clock and the other on my checkbook- most of the time both my eyes are on my pigs. It is a completely different concept that comes with my way of life. Now from what I've read Guinea hogs were very popular because they produced good amounts of lard without any special attention. Some photos I've seen have them looking like very fat potbelly pigs. Potbellies will get fat if overfed but they can be kept lean. Guinea hogs tend to produce lard easily. So, as far as the Guniea is concerned it might be a genetic propensity that will have pros and cons depending on the goals of the producer. My opinion only.
     
  14. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    Like she said, gourmet fare on a shoestring budget. No heavy equipment, only need one person, store extra meat on the hoof. MMMMMMMMM Potbelly stroganoff

     
  15. tbishop

    tbishop Well-Known Member

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    Well I haven't been able to find a place to raise my pigs, so I'm on hold on the guinea hogs (and any other hogs) until I come up with a place. The good news is that the guy that's 3 hours away from me will have them available when I'm ready for them. Thanks for all the helps, you guys.

    Tim