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hi all here is a quick video on how i grow my potatoes providing a lot of easy calories without any special tools.
 

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Thanks for your video. I hope you won't mind a couple of friendly suggestions:

First of all, we get into this discussion every year about potato planting time (here in North America), on growing potatoes in one or another kind of container--rather than just in the ground. Many people do not realize that it is a fallacy that if you put more soil around the stem, that they will grow more stolons that will produce potatoes. Once the rising sprout emerges above the soil, it turns into green stem, and no amount of soil afterwards will change it back to a potato stolon--so one is better off just letting the stem produce more leaves--and thus give the plant more photosynthesis to make your potatoes bigger down below. For that reason, I would suggest putting more soil on the bottom, so you will have more root space and a chance to uptake more nutrients--then the potatoes that you have will grow to a larger size and provide you with more calories per container. As you are doing right now, it looks like your seed potatoes are producing the right number per planting--about 9--10 potatoes, of which you have a couple of average size ones, a couple of smalls that you are replanting, with the rest being what I would call marbles. So, you are losing nearly half your crop for the seed. I think you should look at how good and nutritious is your compost/soil--and how well you give them water during the growing season. I think you might have better results and more harvested calories.

geo
 

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Potatoes are mostly water. Insure the soil will allow expansion of the crop. Insure there is adequate nutrition. Insure plenty of direct sunlight. Then keep the soil wet. 99% of commercial potato production is done on irrigated fields.
 

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We have clay soil not far below the surface, so growing potatoes in containers sounds like a good idea. I have thought of seeing how deep I can go with my John Deere garden tractor rototiller, and then back over it with our own horse manure, and leaves, and then add soil over the top, and till again. I understand needing room for the plant to expand under ground, and that clay won't allow that.
 

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Potatoes are something I never have much luck at. It's weird because a lot of people think of them as one of the easiest calorie dense things to grow but its either some fungus or potato bugs and I'm done. I like turnips and sweet potatoes mostly because I don't have to dust them with anything or baby them.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Potatoes are something I never have much luck at. It's weird because a lot of people think of them as one of the easiest calorie dense things to grow but its either some fungus or potato bugs and I'm done. I like turnips and sweet potatoes mostly because I don't have to dust them with anything or baby them.
from what ive read sweet potatoes are the highest yield calories wies so if sweet potatoes work for you stick to it.you can grow them in a similar way in containers.
 

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Thanks for your video. I hope you won't mind a couple of friendly suggestions:

First of all, we get into this discussion every year about potato planting time (here in North America), on growing potatoes in one or another kind of container--rather than just in the ground. Many people do not realize that it is a fallacy that if you put more soil around the stem, that they will grow more stolons that will produce potatoes. Once the rising sprout emerges above the soil, it turns into green stem, and no amount of soil afterwards will change it back to a potato stolon--so one is better off just letting the stem produce more leaves--and thus give the plant more photosynthesis to make your potatoes bigger down below. For that reason, I would suggest putting more soil on the bottom, so you will have more root space and a chance to uptake more nutrients--then the potatoes that you have will grow to a larger size and provide you with more calories per container. As you are doing right now, it looks like your seed potatoes are producing the right number per planting--about 9--10 potatoes, of which you have a couple of average size ones, a couple of smalls that you are replanting, with the rest being what I would call marbles. So, you are losing nearly half your crop for the seed. I think you should look at how good and nutritious is your compost/soil--and how well you give them water during the growing season. I think you might have better results and more harvested calories.

geo
the soil is verry good the only reason these didnt get verry big is they died out and died before they were fully formed. as somone else in the thread said potatoes require quite a bit of water and we have had a bit of a drought here lately should have watered but have been busy with other projects and forgot about them.
 

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my DD planted some potatoes in containers. one container yielded one potato,, it was about 6 inches in diameter. just a bit smaller than a football..
sweet potatoes do well in raised beds , also.
I hill my potatoes only to make the rows easier to find when we go digging them up.
this year I am going to plant only sweet corn.
I am thinking of making hills and then planting the seeds on top of the hills.
a friend told me to not use raw manure on potatoes.
claims that is what makes them scabby .
.....jiminwisc....
 
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