growing and finishing hogs

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by bretthunting, Nov 7, 2005.

  1. bretthunting

    bretthunting Well-Known Member

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    i have a question about raising a hog.we are looking at buying 4 feeder pigs,and was woundering if i can grow and finish them on corn. we have 400 bushells of corn that we harvested off of our own land and am feeding and fattening 3 calves on this and hay and was woudering if i could do the same with pigs(no hay of course)
     
  2. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Corn has fattened hogs for centurys. A ltttle legume hay is good to add to their diet. It will take less corn if you include extra protien in their feed such as soybean oil meal. 40 or 50 bushel of corn should feed them all out.
     

  3. John Schneider

    John Schneider Well-Known Member

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  4. bretthunting

    bretthunting Well-Known Member

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    can i feed dry,baled hay? will they eat it?
     
  5. John Schneider

    John Schneider Well-Known Member

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    Yes...you can feed baled hay. That is what I do. I feed a fairly rich alfalfa hay. I think it helps if they have been exposed to the pasture ahead of time, but if you put some hay in a manger and then sprinkle with corn or chop etc. they will start to consume it. I am in the process of getting my antique John Deere Hammermill set up with alfalfa screens so that I can mill my hay and mix it in with the chop. That is a more efficient way of feeding hay to hogs.
     
  6. bretthunting

    bretthunting Well-Known Member

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  7. John Schneider

    John Schneider Well-Known Member

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    no problem...I hope your hog experience is a good one. Good eating!
     
  8. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Canadians feed "chop". In the states it's "ground feed"

    Either will work if you don't tell the pigs. LOL
     
  9. John Schneider

    John Schneider Well-Known Member

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    Yes...that is another 'canadianism'. Up here, the primary source of feed is barley "chop". Peas are also being utilized more as a protein source. I am seeing more and more corn up here now though.
     
  10. gilberte

    gilberte Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thinking about growing a small patch of alfalfa to add to my home grown feed. Would it be okay to let it grow to 4"-6" and mow with my garden tractor and feed green or should it be dry?
     
  11. Misty

    Misty Misty Gonzales

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  12. John Schneider

    John Schneider Well-Known Member

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    Check out the links I posted. No need to burn a bunch of gas...hogs will do the mowing, fertilizing and aerating all at once. If you want to keep your pasture in good condition split it into very small parcels and rotate them through intensively. They won't have time to root and will eat it down enough to provide them with some good feed. one strand of electric is enough to split your bigger field into small paddocks. Fresh alfalfa is great. Other legumes are great too. No bloating with hogs.
     
  13. highlands

    highlands Walter Jeffries Supporter

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    We raise our pigs on pasture during the warm months and in garden corrals on hay during the worst of the winter when the snows are deep. In the winter we give them hay, same stuff we feed the sheep. They bed in it and eat it. No need to do any special handling, just toss in bales of hay. I remove and save the twine. Round bales are even cheaper. I have raised pigs on just pasture and hay some years. Other years I have suplemented their diet with excess milk and cheese trim. I figure a grower eats an average of about 4 lbs of hay per day. A sow (400 to 500 lbs) eats about 8 to 10 lbs of hay a day. Probably the same pasture weight in warm weather but I've never tried to measure that. Feeding just pasture and hay it takes about a month longer for them to reach market weight but it is a lot less expensive, the manure is better quality and the meat is better quality (higher in Omega-3s).

    Cheers,

    -Walter
    in Vermont
     
  14. ihedrick

    ihedrick Can't stop thinkin'

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    This summer I tossed in grass clippings; hoping the pigs would work it into the ground (next years' garden area)...they loved the stuff! They've been getting hay to sleep in and eat along with their regular grain and pumpkins.