Ground for Portable Electric Fencing

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Tango, May 11, 2006.

  1. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,205
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2002
    Location:
    Florida
    I have a portable electric fence with the 1 1/2 inch tape and step in posts. I have so far moved it in partial sections leaving the ground in one place with the first post but now have to move it entirely. So I dug up the 6 ft. ground rod :hobbyhors and moved the entire thing to another site. I don't want to do that again :help: Do ya'll just buy different ground rods and put them in permanent areas, then just move the fence around to those areas? Or is there a different way to ground these portable systems? Speaking of which... do any of you use elctrc tape fencing for rotational grazing (which is what I am attempting to do with my Jersey)?
     
  2. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    8,323
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2004
    Location:
    MN
    Because I'm in a wet area, & I have water-holding clay soils.....

    I locate my solar fencer by the perimiter wire, which has wire fencing & several steel T posts. I just run the ground to a T post, and it runs through the woven wire & several of the T posts.

    This is 'good enough' for my conditions 99% of the time.

    In sandy or dry conditions, one has to do better than this. And just one T post isn't good enough either, but I can use the perimiter, woven fencing with several T's.

    I use barbed wire for my 'portable' fence, but I'm dealing with 40 critters & coernstalks or ditched grassy areas..... I use a bit of the tape for one area, and it works fine if your critters have enough to eat & respect it.

    --->Paul
     

  3. Oldotaku

    Oldotaku Member

    Messages:
    23
    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2002
    I've had to install and remove ground rods for various projects, and here are some tips I've found useful.

    1) If you're going to leave the rod in for a long time, or permanently, use a post pounder to install the rod most of the way, then use a sledge to drive it in the rest of the way. A homemade sledge cap, a piece of steel with a deep 1/2" to 5/8" hole in it, with a large setscrew (like a 1/4 - 20 bolt) makes driving with a sledge much easier.

    2) If it's temporary, use water to install the rod. Wet down the ground where you want the rod, and jam the rod into the wet spot. Next, pour a little water down the rod, and use a pumping motion to force the rod into the soil. Add more water if the rod stops moving. If you do it right, you should see a slurry of mud forced out of the hole every time you pump down on the rod. I've seen a professional electrician put in a 8' rod with a 12 oz pop can of water.

    3) To remove a rod, make sure you have 6" to 12" of rod exposed, and enough room around it to operate a high-lift farm jack. Disconnect the wires from the rod, and use the little bronze clamp to provide a hook for the jack to latch onto. If you don't have the bronze clamp, use a big vicegrip, and put the hook of the jack as close to the rod as possible. If the rod starts to bend, lower the jack, loosen the clamp, and clamp lower down. Once you have half the rod out, you can usually pull it the rest of the way by hand.

    4) If you're installing the rod in the field, make sure you flag it well. Driving over it will ruin a tire, and make a sizable hole in your wallet too.
     
  4. gccrook

    gccrook Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    998
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2003
    Location:
    SC Kansas
    It doesn't need to be 6 ft unless you have very dry dirt, and even then you still might need to wet it. I only stick mine in about 12 - 24 inches, and that works fine. If the animals are not getting shocked, then the ground is too dry.
     
  5. bumpus

    bumpus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,280
    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2003
    Location:
    Right Here
    .
    You can drive two or three short stakes ( Two feet in length each ) a foot or so apart and connect the three together with one ground wire.

    Then pour water on the stakes to make the ground wet and let it soak in and keep it wet.

    bumpus
    .
     
  6. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,205
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2002
    Location:
    Florida
    Thank you :) Our soil isn't dry. We've had plenty of rain but when I was only able to get the rod down to 3 feet due to the rocks, the zap wasn't nearly sufficient. When it is down all the way to 5.5 ft., even the goats respect it. Maybe the 2 or 3 2 ft. rods will be the same. I'll try it :)
     
  7. Hammer4

    Hammer4 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    486
    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2005
    Location:
    Missouri
    Tango I am using tape for temp fencing, but my charger and ground rods stay in the same spot, I just run a insulated lead wire to where I need to hook up the temp fence. Maybe you can have a convenient 'hotspot' that you can hook your temp fences to when you are moving the stock around?
     
  8. Beeman

    Beeman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,977
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2002
    Location:
    East TN
    Most electric chargers now call for 3 ground rods. Here in e. TN it many times takes 3- 6' ground rods to get the job done.