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When the husk starts peeling off.

Going to make Verde Salsa??

Will
 

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Opps, I'm thinking about tomatillos. But, it should still be the same.
 

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I'm growing Ground Cherries for the first time this year. They have a kind of unusual tomato/pineapple taste. I'm looking forward to cooking them into a pie or jam or something. I've been harvesting after the husk turns dry and the stem easily separates off of the plant. I've also heard to just wait until they fall off on their own.
 

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sassy_mare said:
Some call them ground cherries - some husk tomatoes...

When do I know they are ripe?

thanks!
I've been calling them things I can't mention here. They have come up all over my peanut patch. I like tomatoes, but not as much as boiled peanuts.LOL :flame: :Bawling:
 

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They are called ground cherries for good reason. That's where they ripen. Let them fall off the vine on their own. Then leave them where they fall for about a week. When the fruit first falls, it is a greenish color. After a week, it's bright gold.

Martin
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Uh oh...

I am in northern Minnesota and these babies look FAR from falling or the husks drying out...

The plants are proliferous - look great - but frost could be only weeks away! What then? Can I pick them and ripen indoors like a tomato?

Thanks all - I have about 6 plants, so I don't want them to go to waste...
 

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They may be closer to falling than you think. There is nothing that you can do to speed them up. Wait them out. That's why Tallpines was able to enjoy a pie. All of a sudden the ground is covered with them! Frost will cause the whole works to drop. Anything close to maturity will then ripen.

Also, you will now have them forever. I've had mine for about 40 years after buying plants one time in the 1960s. Despite their small size, there are hundreds of tiny seeds in them and they will ensure that you never have to buy them again.

Martin
 
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