grist mill????

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by sentree, Feb 8, 2004.

  1. sentree

    sentree Member

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    .I was just at a friends and discussing the roller mill dilemma, and he asked if I have looked for the older mills that ran on belts but could easily convert to motor if I wanted to. He said they are lying around all over and sell from $80-150 each. He said it runs almost like a grist mill with two stones/metal things (burrs?) that grind the grain into different sizes. So he gave me hte name of a fellow to phone, but said he doesn't have a clue what it is called. I don't mind phoning the guy, but don't know what to ask about - anybody know what this mill is called?
    This is just for grinding animal feed
    Thanks
    heather
     
  2. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    feed hammer mill
     

  3. Don Armstrong

    Don Armstrong In Remembrance

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    NOT a hammer mill. A hammer mill swings lumps of iron or steel into and through what's being ground. They are definitely good things, and will pulverise whatever is fed to them short of hard rocks. Hay, grain, bones, meat. dead chickens, whatever.

    However, that's not what you're describing. I don't know the specific term you want, but the people who have one do. Just call and ask about "a feed mill for grinding grain and stuff".
     
  4. They are simply called "burr mills". As indicated they can have either steel burrs, or can have grinding stones which are more aptly called stone mills by some.

    The burr mill my family had on the farm would grind from coarse to almost flour like.
    It was an International McCormick-Deering brand, and was powered by a flat belt driven by tractor pulley. We used it to grind livestock feed.

    I'm not sure that one would be real easy to convert from flat belt to v-belt, PTO, or other engine driven. I guess the pulley shaft configeration would have a lot to do with the ease of conversion.

    In 1996 ours sold for $50 when the estate was sold off. Now a days the flat belt alone will sell for that in most areas.

    Lehman Hardware has a comparison chart in their catalog that will give you an idea of some questions you may want to ask. http://www.lehmans.com