grinding wheat

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by ratherbefishin, Dec 20, 2004.

  1. ratherbefishin

    ratherbefishin Well-Known Member

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    Last summer's projectwas an outdoor brick oven- and the effort was well worth it-bakes really good hearth bread.Now I want to take the process another step forward- grinding my own wheat.Any advice on grinders, models, best sources of wheat[this may sound ignorant-but can you use just ordinary wheat such as sold for feed?]would be welcome.Als0 do you ''age'' your flour after grinding[ my father who was a baker tells of buying fresh ground wheat[ back in the 30's when they bought itfrom local mills] and aging it before making bread.
     
  2. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    One of the main reasons for grinding your own is to enjoy the freshness, so I can't see why you would want to age the flour?

    You can use the wheat from the feed store, but you will need to clean it first. They normally sell it with the husk removed but don't clean it well enough to go thru a grinder. If you can find hard red winter wheat it makes the best bread. Soft white wheat doesn't make good gluten. Most health food stores carry 50# bags of organic or chemical free wheat.

    I really like my Whisper Mill. Tho it really isn't all that quiet, I haven't compared it to other mills, they may be much louder. It doesn't run that long at a time, so I just use ear plugs when using it. The mill cost about $200. But it has already paid for itself many times over.
     

  3. ratherbefishin

    ratherbefishin Well-Known Member

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    yes,I'm aware of the fact that hard wheat makes the best bread-and I note you said the grinder has paid for itself''many times over''- can you give me a cost analysis of grinding your own wheat vs. buying flour?Also- how do you ''clean'' regular wheat?
     
  4. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    You clean wheat by pouring it onto a clean surface while wind or a fan blows the chaff away. Then before putting it into the grinder, pour it onto a cookie sheet and check carefully for stones that will tear up your grinder.

    It is hard to give a breakdown for cost savings since it depends on how much you use, where you buy it and whether it is a commonly used product or something 'unusual'. We don't buy wheat anymore because my daughter can't have gluten. The savings mounts up much faster when you are grinding 'specialty' flours.

    I'll use Walton Feed prices since I won't be going to the feed store till next year.

    50# hard red wheat 8.20
    50# hrw flour 16.95

    50# long brown rice 8.50
    they don't carry rice flour, it is nearly $4.00 a # at our local grocery. That would be nearly 200.00 for fifty #. I've gone thru a couple of 50# bags already. And expect to go thru several more.

    You can also grind your own corn for cornmeal. You would not believe the difference in flavor! Fifty # corn 6.25 at walton's. How much is cornmeal these days? (We had to stop eating corn, DD can't have it.)

    You can also have an amazing variety of flours to use that you might not be able to purchase locally. If you can purchase them they would not be fresh. Ever try to buy sweet potato flour?