Grinding own burger/fat content question?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by emke, Jun 23, 2005.

  1. emke

    emke Well-Known Member

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    If I were doing it I would cut the outer fat off. Or mix it with some venison, to get less fat to meat ratio. I think regular ground beef is 75% meat/25% fat. Ground chuck is 80% meat/20% fat. Briskets have a WHOLE lot of fat on them.
     
  2. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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    Grinding your own burger is lots safer,its made from only a few cows,as opposed to lots of cows in factory ground meat.Fewer sources in burger,less chance of contamination,be it bacterial or disease.

    I use round steaks(or London Broil) on sale in the 1.79/lb range.Very lean burger and tastes much better than premade hamburger(made from every scrap of whatever left over at the plant.)

    Actually,I usually make burger from my beef jerky trim,dont want any fat in jerky,and its easier to trim bigger peices with fat on em,then to get every little piece of fat off.I get 2/3's jerky meat,1/3 to grind into burger.If anything,my burger is too lean to hold together.

    And a plug too for the Kitchenaide mixer with the meat grinder attachment,love that machine!

    BooBoo
     

  3. Kimon

    Kimon Not a Cannibal

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    We use 7 bone chuck, it seems to be about the right fat to meat ration for a tasty burger that holds together well. If you cook your burgers well done (yuck) you can use a little bit of bread crumbs and some eggs to extend your burgers and use a leaner cut of meat because the eggs will help hold the patties together. If you are just grinding meat to have chopped meat for spaghetti sauce, or taco meat and such you can go as lean as you like.

    One trick in making patties i have found is to make balls out of the meat then sandwich them between wax paper and roll them to the desired thickness, then punch in the edges to make a uniform patty.

    I also spray a little cooking spray of a mist of olive oil on the patties to keep them from sticking to the grill.
     
  4. stormwalker

    stormwalker Well-Known Member

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    Ask your butcher. I often have them make me hamburger from a piece of meat that's on sale. Maybe you could combine two cuts of meat to get the fat ratio yuo want. I tend to like really lean hamburger. It's not dry when I eat it because it's almost raw!
     
  5. A.T. Hagan

    A.T. Hagan Guest

    Depends on what you want to use the burger meat for. In my experience less than 15% fat won't make a good hamburger, it'll be dry.

    But for most anything else I want less than 10%.

    I find chuck roasts to be about right.

    .....Alan.
     
  6. NWSneaky

    NWSneaky Well-Known Member

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    I am a experienced sausage maker. If you grind lean beef you will end up with little taste and wonder what happened with the texture. If you want taste add pork back fat. If you just want beef, barbecue the brisket over hickory or mesquite. BTW, I just bought Wal-Mart brisket for $1.19/pound.
     
  7. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Cut the brisket in half. Grind one half as is, the other with the outer fat trimmed off. Make one hamburger from each, weighing to make sure they are the same. Cook. The one with the extra fat will shrink more, but does it taste better?

    I also start my burgers as a ball, then flatten with my hands,lay down, and use a spatula to mark criss cross on the burger. This criss crossing helps to flaten the burger, and it seems to cook nicer.
     
  8. NWSneaky

    NWSneaky Well-Known Member

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    I like lean, flat burgers so I use Lodge weights (presses) --- if you like juicy type burgers add water before you cook 'em --- that's what your grocery store does.


    Anyone grill up lots of onions on top of them and butter-toast the buns?


    BTW --- I speak here of an electric, counter top grill.
     
  9. Thanks for all the inputs. I think Maura may have the right ideal. Cut it in half and ground the first half with fat and all and compare it to the other half that has been trimmed.

    We don't eat a whole lot of burger patties as we use most of our ground meat for casserole dishes (hamburger helper), stew, or chili. Something that stretches a little futher.