Grinding horseradish

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Charleen, Jun 19, 2004.

  1. Charleen

    Charleen www.HarperHillFarm.com Supporter

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    We live borderline of zones 5&6. Our horseradish is one of the first things to pop up in the spring. We grind our roots to use on ham and our eggs for our Easter breakfast. I had always heard that you should grind the roots only in the spring before the leaves grow. Why can't you do it other times of the year? Would it be less potent? I'd love to whip up a few batches and sell it at our farmer's market.

    Thanks
     
  2. Rita

    Rita Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I ran out of the horseradish I made in the Fall and just tried to make some and even the thinnest roots were very woody. Had to throw it all out. Will try in the Fall or early spring.
     

  3. steff bugielski

    steff bugielski Well-Known Member

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    I make horseradish sauce every year. I dig up the roots in the fall anf peel and grind. It is always very potent and delicious. I cut about 1 inch below the green and replant. In spring they grow to full size. Some peolpe plant in 5 gallon pails with the bottom cut out so they don't take over.
    steff
     
  4. mtfarmchick

    mtfarmchick Well-Known Member

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    I guess the saying is that you can harvst it in any month with an "R" in it. Makes sense since those months are September through April.
     
  5. Hi i come from a large German family and we literaly ground it by the wash tub to use in all the familys and to sell.The (R) month thing is right.The key is since it takes a year to make a good size root plant some in the spring and the fall so can harvest both times.We get 4 dollars per pint,but would like to find a place to but 12oz. jars as they would stay better.also put some citric acid in 1/4 t per jar to keep it white.
     
  6. renee7

    renee7 Well-Known Member

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    My horseradish is doing great. And I need to dig one to put grapes there. How do you make HR sauce. I think I read somewhere just add vinegar.
    How much?
     
  7. primal1

    primal1 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hi folks,
    this is the recipe i use and next time I do it i'm wearing goggles hahaha:

    This is a pungent condiment that usually accompanies meats and fish. It loses much of its bite after a few months in the refrigerator.* Varieties of horseradish sauce include creamed horseradish = cream-style horseradish, which is made with mayonnaise and/or sour cream, red horseradish, which is made with beet juice, and white horseradish, which is made with vinegar.***

    To make your own:** When exposed to air, the flesh of the horseradish root begins a enzymatic reaction that causes it to become first more pungent (this takes a few minutes), and then much less pungent (this takes about half an hour). Adding a sour liquid stops the reaction and locks in the heat for several months. To make horseradish sauce, peel a horseradish root and chop it into small pieces.

    Grind it in a blender, adding enough water or ice cubes to enable the blade to turn freely. For each cup of grated horseradish, add 1/2 cup vinegar and 1/2 teaspoon salt and blend thoroughly.* Adding the vinegar immediately after grating will yield a mild horseradish. If you add the vinegar after a few minutes when the pungency peaks, the sauce will be hotter.

    WARNING: Fresh horseradish is surprisingly potent, so make sure your kitchen is very well ventilated, wear rubber gloves, and don't rub your eyes. Refrigerate or freeze until ready to use.* Substitutes:* wasabi


    P

    Edit: I just thought you horseradish lovers would like to know that a little horseradish can be added to toothpaste for antiseptic benefits, it also heals mouth ulsers and kills bacteria.... I use Tom's of Maine Fennel toothpaste and the combo is delicious :D.

    Warning: too much horseradish can cause night sweats, occasional diarrea and abdominal cramping. ;)
     
  8. johnghagen

    johnghagen Well-Known Member

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    We run it thru a meat grinder after it is peeled then add it to a blender and to one blender full we add 2C white vinegar and 1/2t kosher salt and 1t of citric acid.
     
  9. primal1

    primal1 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I like the sound of yours johnghagen, I think i'll give it a try this fall.

    Is there a reason we bother to peel it? Like many root veges the skins are edible so i'm just curious if traditionally we peel just because of maybe older roots having tougher skins or to keep the horseradish very white(as opposed to having brown flakes of skin in it).

    I might do a tester batch to see if it has an effect on taste... it would be a real time saver if it didn't really matter.

    P
     
  10. DW

    DW plains of Colorado Supporter

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    I always heard the month w/"r" and to wait until after it frosts. It's pretty easy for us to wait until after frost as this usually happens in Sept. I don't think roots less than 2 yrs. old are very good either. If you have old roots, I don't think it matters when you make it. I one time helped my niece make 50 jars in June of some roots that had been there for years and it was great. Then another summer we made some that had only been in the ground a year and it had no kick. I have made it with a grinder(huge batch) and blender(sm. batch). We just added white vinegar in the blender and it was great. I think I will try adding the salt this year.
     
  11. cntryfarmfreak

    cntryfarmfreak New Member

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    I have found out that if you dry the horse radish roots first then grind them up you do not get the pungent ordor. then you can add your liquid back. Also horse radish grown as a border for you vegetable garden will keep out rabitts and woodchucks.
     
  12. stumpyacres

    stumpyacres Well-Known Member

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    grind it with vinegar in the food processor - add grated beets and sugar...mmmmm
     
  13. karsan

    karsan Well-Known Member

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    Will it really keep out rabbits? We had pet rabbits in the garden, and fed them horseradish leaves when the plant became too big. They loved it!