Grill and/or Smoker Recomendations

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by duke3522, Jun 2, 2005.

  1. duke3522

    duke3522 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    227
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2004
    Location:
    Indiana
    Hi,

    Anybody have a recommendation on what gas or charcoal outdoor grill. I have been leaning toward charcoal for flavor. But I also want my grill to be a back up cooking system if the power goes out (electric stove). The folks about two mile south of me didn’t have power for almost 10 days after the ice storm this winter.

    I plan to use the grill quite a bit. I like to really load it up and eat the leftovers for a couple of days. And it needs to be fairly good size so I can feed a family gathering. I would also like to do some smoking if possible.

    I guess something like this one is what I am after: The Grill I Like!


    Thanks
    Duke
     
  2. porboy298

    porboy298 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    70
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    Texas Panhandle
    Duke,
    Have one almost like it and it will probably do every thing you want. Mine is still
    going strong after 4 years.
    Bill


     

  3. Sedition

    Sedition Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    93
    Joined:
    May 30, 2003
    What you’ve linked to is not a grill. It is a standard offset firebox barbecue cooker. It actually does a horrendous job of being a “grill” because the firebox doesn’t provide enough heat to grill meat. If you use the cooking chamber to hold charcoal, you’ll burn the heck out of your meat because there are no effective baffles and the grates set too close to charcoal placed in the bottom. However, que’s like this one also do a great double-duty as smoker’s if you have a bit of know-how.

    Now, there’s a darn important science behind good barbecue. Most folk can’t cook a hunk of meat right to save their life. And we human’s ought to be pretty good at it by now, we’ve been using fire to sear animal flesh for about the last 300,000 years – since before we were even human darn it. Menfolk in particular have a duty to learn how to make the meat and the flame merge into something magical – we can’t let our kids grow up and lose this tie with where we come from. I ‘cue almost every weekend, and have judged and competed professionally

    Here’s some outdoor cooking terms and tips.

    Grilling – is the process of rapidly searing meat over high heat – 500F+. This is best for steak cuts. Grilling requires a deep cooking vessel with air-flow baffles to control the direct heat, like a campfire. The Weber Kettle Grill is the archetype.

    Barbecuing (sometimes called smoking or smoke-cooking, ‘specially in Texas) - is the process of slowing cooking meat over moderate heat, 250-350F or so. This is best for big and not-tender cuts, like brisket or my favorite - pork shoulder (aka picnic, aka butt). Que’n requires well controlled, but moderate indirect heat – like an oven. The original “mass market” cooker was the New Braunfuls off-set firebox, which was purchased by Brinkman around Y2K, but never patented – so many company’s now offer this style of single-box offset firebox cookers – generally sold as “Wood Smoke Grills”, or “Char-Grills” after the Char-Broil brand that is the most popular knock-off. This is the cooker in your link.

    Smoking – is the process of pickling meat with wood smoke (via creosote). Charcoal can’t be used to smoke, you actually end up dehydrating meat with charcoal instead of smoking it. Offset firebox cooker’s do an excellent job of smoking, in fact I smoked three old hens on Saturday and Sunday on my barbecue.

    The secret is to take an old cardboard box, cut a hole in it, and sit it on top of the smoke vent (flue) on the cooker body. I then punch some holes and put through green hardwood twigs for hanging sausage, bacon or a couple chickens on. For fish, I have some old stainless steel grates out of a junked fridge that I use. Cut another hole in the top of the cardboard box to let the smoke out – if you don’t do this, the smoker won’t work because it lacks air-flow.

    Here’s a good spot to learn the basics. http://www.barbecuen.com/
     
  4. airotciv

    airotciv Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2005
    Location:
    NW Oregon
    We have had this grill for the last 2 years and we love it. It grills great and smokes food wonderfully. It does take alittle getting use to. When having the fire box on is different than well not having it on. But I don't think we will ever go back to the others we have had in the past. We use are grill all year, Love smoke turkey at Christmas, we live in the Northwest and it does Salmon. well to die for :p
     
  5. duke3522

    duke3522 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    227
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2004
    Location:
    Indiana
    Hi Everyone,

    Thanks for the replies. Went to Lowe's and checked one out. Looked at the Super Pro and I will most likely go ahead and get the side fire box.

    Sedition I think that this one can be grilled on as well. At lowe's the main burn chamber is sold alone, and the side fire box is an add on. Real nice main chamber. Has adjustable grate for the coals, and removeable cast iron food grates to add more charcoal.

    It looked to be well belt except for the cheap wood shelves. may not even put those on.

    thanks
    Duke