Green Shell beans for fall sales

Discussion in 'Market Gardens' started by mommagoose_99, Jan 8, 2007.

  1. mommagoose_99

    mommagoose_99 Well-Known Member

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    I love beans, mostly to look at, but I love to eat them too. A few years back I decided to try growing both green shell beans and dried beans. It was pretty successful and the beans gave me one more thing to sell with pumpkins, potatoes, onions and gourds at the fall farmers market.
    Green shell beans are beans picked as soon as the pod begins to get flexible and the seeds have filled out the pods. I planted Vermont Bush Cranberry and Tongues of Fire. The pods have red stripes and the seeds are beautiful red and white when shelled. Usually I picked after the nights were starting to freeze but before a really hard frost.Green shell beans make soup, and chili delicious.I sold shell beans both in the pod $1 a pound and shelled $2 a pound and always sold out. We have a large Italian community and the beans are in big demand.
    For dry beans I just picked out varieties that were ready to harvest at similar times . I sold my dried beans in mixes so I picked a lot of different colors and sizes. I picked dried pods , shelled them and placed my beans in the dehydrator for several days , sorted out the bad beans , weighed them and placed them in ziplock bags. I sold some by variety and some as a mix.
    Check out Vermont Bean and Seed for some colorful beans. I love that catalog. There are not too many pests for beans here in NY . The beans improve the soil and you do not need to pick them every day like regular beans . Once or twice through the row and the job is done. Store the beans loosely in paper bags until you can work them or pull up the whole plant and tie the roots together and hang in a dry place until you can get to them to shell. Mold after harvest is the only problem I had and I fixed that by keeping the pods dry.Dry pods do not sell at the market so you will have to shell all the dry beans. It gave me something to do while I watched TV since I did not have a fanning mill.
    Linda
     
  2. HilltopDaisy

    HilltopDaisy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thank you Linda. So you were actually able to sell the dry beans the same season that you harvested, that same fall? What was your harvest amount like? Did you get a lot of beans for the amount of land you devoted to them? What would you charge per pound? I like this idea very much.
     

  3. mommagoose_99

    mommagoose_99 Well-Known Member

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    Yep I sold the beans the same season as I grew them. Plant the beans in late May and they should be ready to harvest in about 90 days as I recall. You better check a catalog to be sure. It has been a while since I sold them. My numbers may be a bit off. I bought 5 pounds of Kidney beans to plant ,a pound each of yellow eye , soldier beans, Black Valentine , tiny red Mexican, and black Beans, Navy beans . I also had the Vermont Caranberry Beans and the Tongue of Fire beans that had gotten too dryto sell for green shell beans, to add to the mixes. I tried to get similar ripening dates for the beans . I have two food dehydrators which I placed the shelled beans in to make sure they were really dry before packageing them up. I got $2 a pound for the dried beans. I had a ton of ancient canning jars. The kinds that used the rubbers. I filled them with beans and sold a few too. I can't remember how much they went for but basically they were buying the beans and the jar was thrown in . Mostly the one pound bags of beans are what sold. Shelling the beans is a lot of work and there is a lot of time involved. If I have to pick beans though I would rather pick the colorful shelling beans especially since you only need to go through the plants once or twice :)
     
  4. ceresone

    ceresone Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I planted the beautiful Christmas limas, and green pole beans this past year, first time.summer turned much hotter than normal--days over 100 degrees. my limas produced, at most 10 beans. the green, not any better. regular climbing limas bloomed like mad, no pods even. decided to leave the few green beans (pole) hanging to dry- after the heat, rains started, and they molded. climbing peas, same story.
    so--all my climbers were failures this year--i'll stick to bush types---but oh, they were so colorful!!
     
  5. mommagoose_99

    mommagoose_99 Well-Known Member

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    I bet your beans aborted from the heat . Peppers will do the same. There is a small temperature window for peppers to be fertilized to make fruit. Any time the air temperature is over 90 the flowers will fall off a pepper plant.
    I sure hope we all have better weather this year. I can not afford to loose another season like last year.
     
  6. chicamarun

    chicamarun Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for the information on the beans - I am so looking forward to doing some this season for myself (maybe sell - but not aiming for it). I'm trying Jacob Cattle Beans this season - as it seems to be a good all around been (I bought some before to try in most of my recipes)

    Our peppers didn't take off until no one wanted or needed peppers (go figure!) because of a drought situation then lots of rain - THEN happy peppers.... too many for me even to pickle for just us!