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Master Of My Domain
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Discussion Starter #1
since beans fix nitrogen, what are their uptake requirements? in other words, if i grow beans in the same spot, what will be depleted? this is not a problem, i am just curious.
 

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I'm growing both green and yellow beans this year. The poor plants got knocked down by wind and driving rain just when they were starting to look great! I thought they were gonners for sure, so I just ignored them thinking I wouldn't get any beans this year. Well, color me clueless.....they've been making lots of beans. The only care they've received is mulching and water. The plants still look pathetic, but they're makin' beans :)

I realize this doesn't answer your question, but it's the only experience with growing green beans I have had!
 

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Master Of My Domain
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Discussion Starter #3
my plants, yellow and green, were all loaded big time and tipped...as usual. no big deal i guess. i had a few rusty beans, but i also had oodles of nice beans on the first pick. the second pick not so nice as they were bug eaten, but they made good soup. i try to hill my beans a little with a hoe, but i just accept that bush beans will tip over. i guess the advantage to pole beans is the lack of tipping, but i don't really need more work in the garden, so i will pass on the idea of building yet another trellis just for beans.
 

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I'd make sure mainly that phoshorous not be depleted in the soil for fertility. I feed my beans about a weekly or biweekly watering with chicken manure compost tea that seems to keep them growing good. The worse problems we ever get when growing string beans is during a wet season. That's when the rust really seems to show up. Though it's true beans fix nitrogen for themselves in the soil, it doesn't hurt to boost that up during times they don't have quite enough of it 'fixed' to be totally utilized.
 

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As Moonwolf stated, beans can fix their own nitrogen but that doesn't mean that they get to keep it all. If there is anything carboniferous in the soil which requires nitrogen to break down, they are going to yellow up in a hurry as a scream for more nitrogen.

Also, the plants don't produce nitrogen right away and thus need help to get started. I'm trying to think of anything close to a 4-3-3 which is ideal for beans at planting time, with that extra N. For 500 square feet, one could blend 2 pounds of 10-10-10 and 2 pounds of 12-0-0 blood meal. That would give you 6-5-5 which is close enough. Or forgo half of that figuring and use 2 gallons of fresh horse manure per 10 square feet or 100 gallons per 500 square feet.

Martin
 

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Master Of My Domain
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Discussion Starter #6
well, horsey doo i have plenty of, lol. dad always called my sister's horses "worthless hayburners", but he always enjoyed having the horse apples for his garden. she has been giving me lots of stable cleanings the past few months, but it is all mixed with bedding. i may have to hit the pasture if i decide that fresh, pure stuff is needed. i have been dressing the garden in the fall, side dressing during growth and making manure tea. i normally neglect the beans during growth, but the reap the benefits of the fall dressing. since i am putting a second crop in the same spot as the first one, maybe i will drop some apples for them.
 
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