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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got my quinoa grain out to cook some, and was trying to remember how much water to use per cup of dry seed. So I googled for info and got very sidetracked. I want to try to grow some!

Here are the advantages:

It's VERY prolific.

It's a very attractive plant, and will look like an ornamental to the neighbors.

The young leaves can be eaten like spinach

The seeds grow in heads like sorghum, and can be threshed by hand into a trash can or barrel.

The seeds are very high in protein, with a balanced amino acid profile.

The seeds are covered with a bitter coating, preventing birds from eating them while they are still on the plant.

To prepare the seeds for eating, you first soak it for a few hours in water to remove the bitter coating. Don't throw out this water!

Water from soaking is a detergent for washing clothes, and can also be applied to wounds to speed healing.

Seeds can be cooked like rice, toasted for a nutty snack, sprouted for salads, or used like pilaf. They can also be ground into flour.

Read more at these links:

Overview:

http://chetday.com/quinoa.html

Growing a crop:

http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/afcm/quinoa.html

For even more info, search for quinoa in your favorite search engine.
 

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I've been looking for some grain crops to grow in about a quarter acre space. I may try some of this. My wife (since we're forced to be gluten-free in my household) has made bread out of it, but I always found it to taste somewhat bitter. That's probably just my Americanized palate speaking and I'd do well to get rid of that preference.
 

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In Remembrance
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28,242 Posts
Also look at Chia, Cathy. It may be a better choice to grow in your area.
 

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Anchorite Gardener
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194 Posts
The nutritional profile of amaranth leaves and seeds is similar to quinoa.
Amaranth seeds are gluten free and have a balanced amino acid blend.
There are many more varieties of amaranth available and they range in size from 4 to 10 feet.
Very colorful. Love Lies Bleeding amaranth has been in flower gardens for over 100 years.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The nutritional profile of amaranth leaves and seeds is similar to quinoa.
Amaranth seeds are gluten free and have a balanced amino acid blend.
There are many more varieties of amaranth available and they range in size from 4 to 10 feet.
Very colorful. Love Lies Bleeding amaranth has been in flower gardens for over 100 years.
Already have grain amaranth. :)
 

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Also look at Chia, Cathy. It may be a better choice to grow in your area.
and you can order from those late night tv commercials for chia pets! :D

i've got a cup or two of quinoi that i've been meaning to try for a couple months, but haven't gotten around to it yet.
--sgl
 

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WV , hilltop dweller
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3,613 Posts
quinoa is a plant of the cool and high altitude Andes..research the varieties as some have been bred for warmer climate production..I soaked mine and never did get rid of all the saponins(bitter coating). I have grown amaranth before and only wish it had a larger grain. I grew finger millet last year, now there was a plant that produced!
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
quinoa is a plant of the cool and high altitude Andes..research the varieties as some have been bred for warmer climate production..I soaked mine and never did get rid of all the saponins(bitter coating). I have grown amaranth before and only wish it had a larger grain. I grew finger millet last year, now there was a plant that produced!
I don't know what variety of quinoa I get through the buying club for cooking with, but it has NO bitterness.

And I also wish amaranth had a larger seed. And I wish there was a way to get that hull thing off of it. It's good for popping, but that's about all. And it takes a LOT of work to get enough amaranth threshed to make a decent amount of popped grain.
 
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