Grass fed beef

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Rockin'B, Jun 16, 2006.

  1. Rockin'B

    Rockin'B Well-Known Member

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  2. daycab

    daycab Well-Known Member

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    Thanks! They'll be on my table at the farmer's market tommorow.
     

  3. Misty

    Misty Misty Gonzales

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    grass fed beef is for the most part tough. I have had both, grass on more than one occasion, and prefer a good 4-H steer fed lots of good corn, molasses, barley etc....YUMMY and Tender.
     
  4. chas

    chas Well-Known Member

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    Sorry but the omega six (bad) is way too high in grain fed and the good omega three is way too low.
    I learned the modern way in vo ag ,and thru study now raise healthy grass fed animals.
    The guy at the slaughter house said I was full of it when I told him about grass fed animals.
    It was too warm to let my two goats hang for the time I needed.
    So I had them killed and hung in the cooler and then took the carcasses home to cut and wrap.The guy said he couldn't believe the amount of yellow fat ,which is carotin from grass that helps prevent cancer.And he said it was so tender that the meat would split just pressing the knife against it!
    And the wife has the final say on tenderness when it comes to cooking ;)
    Aint nothin better!!!!!!!!!!
    Chas
     
  5. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

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    my dad used to raise a small # of beef back in the seventies. he always told me grass fed beef need to be penned up the last 30 days and fed grain.
     
  6. WolfWalksSoftly

    WolfWalksSoftly Level II -Inappropriate

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    Your Dad was 100 % right. Not only does it make for tender meat, it makes beef
    taste better....I was given some grass fed beef.....the only way I use it, is ground up and used in something like chili or anything else that masks the flavor.
     
  7. Cornhusker

    Cornhusker Unapologetically me Supporter

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    A lot of times what people try to pass off as grass fed beef is an old cow too old to be of any good.
    Technically it's been grass fed it's whole life, but there isn't anything tender about a 10 year old cow.
    Even the hamburger is tough.
    A steer fed on grass and hay butchered young is a whole different thing.
     
  8. daycab

    daycab Well-Known Member

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    Amen Cornhusker.
    Age of the steer has more to do with tenderness than if it was graas or grain fed.
     
  9. whitewolf

    whitewolf Well-Known Member

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    I purchase my grass fed beef from a local rancher. The first time I purchased it I ask him if there was a certain "WAY" I should cook it because I had heard that it required it. He said that his wife cooked it like she always did "regular" beef in the past. I use mostly ground beef and roast and I can't tell a bit of difference in the tenderness. Now this COULD be because of the cuts that I use, I don't know. But it is all I buy now.

    Whitewolf
     
  10. gccrook

    gccrook Well-Known Member

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    Mostly, people here have become acustomed to grain fed beef, and have forgotten what real beef is supposed to taste like. Grain fed beef is a relatively new phenomenon in the annals of time. Of course, cows are intended to eat grass, not corn. Same goes for goats and sheep. If fed grass, there is also less problems with salmonella and e-coli.
     
  11. oz in SC

    oz in SC Well-Known Member

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    Exactly,it is a matter of taste and it is relatively new.

    I believe feeding grain was to push the weight up at first so to get more money,not sure WHERE I read that but readit somewhere.... :shrug:
     
  12. wr

    wr Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    I really don't feel that grass fed or grain finished has much of anything to do with the toughness or tenderness of the meat, that has everything to do with the level of stress at the time of kill and the amount of hang time. Grass fed beef certainly does have a different flavor to some but then home finished beef has a much different flavor than supermarket beef. I would encourage people to give grass fed beef a try but have it processed properly and view the taste with an open mind.
     
  13. gccrook

    gccrook Well-Known Member

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    Absolutely. Feed corn (cheap) to a cow, and it will put on weight much faster, but it changes the meat, and the changes are not good.
     
  14. Cornhusker

    Cornhusker Unapologetically me Supporter

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    Not only that, but when you think about the growth hormones both in the feed and implanted, is it any wonder people are getting fatter all the time?
    With all the antibiotics in the meat, is it any wonder our immune systems are out of whack?
    I believe our food is killing us faster than anything, all the chemicals, the pesticides, herbicides, chemical fertilizers, genetically altered crops and animals, hormones and antibiotics, it's a wonder we're not all dead.
     
  15. Christiaan

    Christiaan Dutch Highlands Farm

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    I raise my beef just on grass and hay and I think it is really great. For optimum flavor and tenderness two things are important to remember. Cook roasts low and slow, so depending on the cut the roasting temp after searing will be 250 or 300. Steaks should never go beyond medium done. Grass fed beef marbles less than grainfed beef as their diet is higher in protein and lower in fat. I raise Highlands, so the low marbling is even more pronounced. Of course the best way to eat any homegrown beef is raw. A thin slice of raw beef with a small splash of Maggi Aroma or a tiny dab of horseradish or pickled ginger. That is fine eating.
     
  16. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

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    there is an alternative red meat. it is called quick beef by some. it has a white tail and antlers. :)
     
  17. Westwood

    Westwood Well-Known Member

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    35 years, grass fed; the ones we put in the freezer.
     
  18. Misty

    Misty Misty Gonzales

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    They have tested the antibiotics approved for the cattle, pigs etc...how long it stays in the meat and put withdraw labels on the bottles. Our immune system's are out of wack because people go to the doc for every little thing and don't allow their bodies to build immunity. Docs prescribe antibiotics many times when they aren't needed. It is not the meat.
     
  19. Rita

    Rita Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm with you on this Cornhusker. Human nature being what it is does anyone think that a person would worry about the withdraw time. A miniscule amount of beef is ever tested for it. They said Vioxx and Celebrex was safe!
     
  20. Jena

    Jena Well-Known Member

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    Hormones are not in beef cattle feed. Some people use implants, but it's not in the feed.

    Tenderness and marbling are often confused. They are two entirely different things. Marbling contributes to taste and juciness. Tenderness is tenderness. Grain fed beef tends to have more marbling.

    Tenderness is determined by age, genetics and how the meat is processed. It has nothing to do with how the animal was fed, except that grass fed takes longer to get to slaughter weight, so they are likely to be older when slaughtered.

    There was a study done about the claims that there are more omega 3's in grass fed beef. It is true that there are more omega 3's in the grass fed fat, but since there's less fat, one would have to eat an inordinate amount of the beef to get enough omega 3's, so that by the time one is done eating, they have eaten way more omega 6's along with the omega 3's, that they would have been better off eating the grain fed beef in the first place.

    There are not antibiotics in beef cattle feed. I forget what they are called, but they are not antibiotics and act against the targeted bacteria in ways that are entirely different than antibiotics do.

    Hormones are used in the production of poultry or pork. Just thought I'd throw that one in there because most people do not know that.

    Feeding grain to cattle does not change the meat. Beef is beef is beef. It does alter the composition and amount of fat, but not the meat.

    A grass based ration is not higher in protein than a grain based ration. Of course, this depends on the ration, but for the most part, people want their grain fed steers to grow fast, so they are sure they get adequate protein. There is no fat in grain, hay or grass.

    All of the people I know who raise cattle commercially worry about withdrawl times. They are not just numbers on a box. They are taken seriously.

    I don't raise beef anymore, but when I did, I found that grass fed or grain fed...it is all a matter of preference. My customers overwhelmingly preferred grain fed. There are those who prefer grass fed. To each his own.

    Jena