Grain silo rental?

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by Sarah J, Feb 25, 2004.

  1. Sarah J

    Sarah J Well-Known Member

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    I have a grain silo that has been un-unsed since we moved in 4 1/2 years ago. We didn't have any livestock at the time and still only have a *small* number of animals. We don't use it. There is no power to it, as far as we can tell, though there used to be. It is currently about 1/3 full of composted materials - whatever *used* to be in it...

    My question is this: how much would it be worth to rent to someone? Is it even possible to use it (after cleaning, obviously) without the power to it? It's about 75 feet tall and 15+ feet in diameter (guestimate). It's one of the biggest in our area.

    But I had a man stop by earlier today while I was gone and my help said he'd be back to talk with me...and I haven't a clue as to what to tell him! Help?!?

    -Sarah
     
  2. Wanda

    Wanda Well-Known Member

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    Sarah
    Is this a regular concrete stave silo with metal bands every few feet to hold it together or is it the Harvestor blue metal kind?If it is a regular silo it can be filled by a tractor driven blower but would need electric for an unloader. The problem is the several tons that are in it now!!Do you have all of the small doors to close it up?If the guy is interested why don't you just sell it to him and let him move it, that would be a better deal for both of you.If he rents it he will need acces to it every day to get silage to feed until it is empty and you will get trafic in your lots even when it is wet and muddy. Just some things to take into consideration.
    Mr. Wanda
    Mike
     

  3. Sarah J

    Sarah J Well-Known Member

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    *Can* something that big be moved? It's a regular concrete one. All the doors are there and the unloader is there, but I'm not sure if the power is as simple as putting the fuses back in and turning it on or if repairs need to be done (I'm clueless). And the several tons, I'm sure, would make great organic fertilizer compost...but getting it out and hauling it to the field, that's another question! :)

    I never even thought about selling it. Now I get to find out how much those buildings are worth, eh? You're right - if he uses it for silage it would be annoying to have him here every day. If it's grain it wouldn't be all that often, though, right? Hmmm... Things to think about... Thanks!

    Sarah
     
  4. Jena

    Jena Well-Known Member

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    You might want to see what the guy wanted. It's possible he was only looking for the unloader to buy. If so, sell it, but make him empty it and haul off the old stuff!

    Jena
     
  5. Wanda

    Wanda Well-Known Member

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    SARAH
    They are easy to move if you are in the buisness.Is it made from individual staves if so it is probably a ribstone there may be a dealer in your area. If so they can give you an idea of what a new one would cost to give you an idea what to ask!!
    Mr. Wanda
    Mike
     
  6. Jackpine Savage

    Jackpine Savage Well-Known Member

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    In our area silos have fallen out of favor. You have to pay to have them taken down. Bunkers and bags are the choices now days. People tired of climbing, repairing unloaders, and chipping frozen silage off from walls. What you probably have left in yours is rotten corn silage or haylage.

    If the guy is looking to store GRAIN in the silo there are some cautions. Grain can put more stresses on a silo than silage and there have been several cases of the silo collapsing!

    http://www.bae.umn.edu/extens/postharvest/towersilos.html
     
  7. fordson major

    fordson major construction and Garden b Supporter

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    if its a concrete slab silo by all means get rid of it! a friend of mine lost part of his barn two cows and his pick up this summer when his execelent 20 year old silo came down on his barn .renting can bring income but also greif and cost if the contract is not lived up to.a farm near us lost three large concrete and two harvestors in a fire after the stored corn caught fire . millions of dollars latter the fire was out and the mess cleaned up
     
  8. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

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    They use them around here,you could probably pull Truck or Wagon up along side it a start shoveling.

    I wouldn't put Grain in it.Don't know what to say on rent,have him shoot you a price and go from there.

    big rockpile
     
  9. Kirk

    Kirk Well-Known Member

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    Empty it out, build a spiral staircase up the inside and a nice deck up on the top. What a view! and it would make a great hunting blind. them deer would never scent ya from way up there.
    Kirk
     
  10. Sarah J

    Sarah J Well-Known Member

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    We thought about sticking our two young girls in the top of it until they were 18... LOL

    Sarah
     
  11. Mike in Ohio

    Mike in Ohio Well-Known Member

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    Interesting post Sarah.

    We have a large silo on a parcel we are buying (we close tomorrow...YIPPEE!). The barns I have a use for.....I don't have a clue about the silo. I'd be interested in hearing how things turn out for you.

    Mike
     
  12. Sarah J

    Sarah J Well-Known Member

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    I haven't heard back from the guy...maybe he found somewhere else or maybe my friend was mistaken? I'm still intrigued though - if *he* isn't coming back to talk with us about it, maybe I can talk with others and see about selling the thing...then I wouldn't have to worry about it anymore, right? Hmmm...

    -Sarah