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Saanen & Boer Breeder
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Hello all. I was wondering if anyone could help me figure out the fat and protein content of my grain? Here is the mix.....


50 Corn
50 Oats
25 Beanmeal
12 Bran
20 Beet pulp
16 Liquid Molasses
1 Vitamins ADEK


I know there is a way to figure it out....just can't seem to make my brain comprehend it LOL! Thanks for any and all help!
 

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The best way I have found is to go to my Morrison Feeds and Feeding book. Thtey have charts that will tell you the values that you are seeking.
If it a commercially mixed ration the place that you purchased it should have that information.
 

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Your protein is basically 8 to 11%. Your 2 predominant ingredients are corn(8% protien) and oats(11% protein). Anytime you mix a lower protein feed with a higher protein feed you are basically reducing the higher protein feed to the lower. Beet Pulp is also around 11% protein and contains a lot of fiber, molasses has little to no protein(or anything else, for that matter, except sweetness), bran is mostly fiber(as is oats), and I'm not familiar with bean meal. With the possible exception of the bean meal, the only fat you have in that mix is from the corn and it is a high energy('hot') feed.
 

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Your protein is basically 8 to 11%. Your 2 predominant ingredients are corn(8% protien) and oats(11% protein). Anytime you mix a lower protein feed with a higher protein feed you are basically reducing the higher protein feed to the lower. Beet Pulp is also around 11% protein and contains a lot of fiber, molasses has little to no protein(or anything else, for that matter, except sweetness), bran is mostly fiber(as is oats), and I'm not familiar with bean meal. With the possible exception of the bean meal, the only fat you have in that mix is from the corn and it is a high energy('hot') feed.
Bean meal is high protein, 48% according to Wikipedia.

I got my copy of morrisons feeds and feeding off eBay for cheep. There are quite
A few editions an older one might be cheeper but have alot less info and be outdated.
 

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That is alot of molasses and beet pulp high energy feed for sure sbm is 42 % protein just a guess you are probably about 16-18% protein
 

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it's almost as high energy as corn or barley.
With corn = 1 beet pulp = .89 or so.
That's pretty high energy.
If you want an animal to put on weight and look sleek you feed beet pulp.
 

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The corn and molasses are what I was mainly refering to it is roughly 150 lb batch of feed and is 10% molasses I get 100 lb to a ton of calf creep feed and it is pretty sticky in the bag that's at 5% by weight I would think this feed would be like syrup almost unless the beet pulp is soaking Most of it up

Also I agree with Sammy on the beet pulp walk around the beef barn section of a county or state fair and see how many bags or beet pulp you see sitting around we also feed some ofour milk cows beet ppulp to help keep them in better condition
 

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Despite being a byproduct of sugar beet processing, beet pulp itself is low in sugar and other non-structural carbohydrates, but high in energy and fiber.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beet_pulp

Due to its high energy content, beet pulp is ideal for horses that have difficulty maintaining weight.
http://www.barastochorse.com.au/facts-about-the-super-fibre-sugar-beet-pulp/

On the other hand, high-energy feeds such as grains in general, oil cake and dried sugar beet pulp have an efficiency for production purposes

All the results reported here show that beet pulp is an excellent source of energy for ruminants during the growing-finishing period and during lactation. In compounding high-energy rations, beet pulp may be used as the sole source of energy or as a replacement for some of the grain, whether it be barley or maize.
http://www.fao.org/3/a-x6512e/X6512E21.htm

any high energy concentrate such as grain or beet pulp will increase feed efficiencies.
Beet pulp has an advantage in that it doesn't cause acidosis like corn will.
 
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