Grafting for apple trees

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by vicker, Nov 5, 2006.

  1. vicker

    vicker Well-Known Member

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    I planted 6 apple trees a few years ago. All but 2 are doing well, but those two were scraped badly by a buck deer. There happens to be an old farm nearby with some old apple trees (red apples) that are just the best apples I've ever put in my mouth. They are also great cooking apples. I want to graft some scions off those trees using my two deer rubbed trees as stock. The ones I want to use for stock are a little over one inch diameter below the rubbed spot. Can someone tell me how to accomplish this? I have found some web sites explaining the procedure, but would still like some practical advise, if anyone has any to offer.
    Thanks.
     
  2. vinylfloorguy

    vinylfloorguy Well-Known Member

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    Hi vicker, I think grafting is a disappearing art. It is hard finding information on how to do it. I think you would be alright grafting to your trees that have been rubbed but I think you would be better off starting with new root stock. Good luck and I would be interested in the web sites that you have found.
     

  3. WisJim

    WisJim Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Check with your local ag extension and see if they offer any grafting classes in the spring. Or they may be able to refer you to a local person with grafting knowledge. Otherwise do some searching on the internet, but I found that a few hours with an experience grafter was worth days reading books and articles.
     
  4. vicker

    vicker Well-Known Member

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    Thanks folks. I guess I'll just wing it. It doesn't look too difficult. I'll top graft two scions onto the root stocks. It seems the main thing is to make sure the cambrium layers of your scions match up to the same on the root stock. Cut scions in the winter and store in a plastic bag (refridgerated) and graft early spring right at the cracking of the buds. Also important to make sure you keep track of the top and bottom of the scions, and place them acccordingly.
    I just did a google search on "fruit tree grafting" and found several sites explaining it. I also have some books. Maybe I'll try to bud graft some on my good trees too :)