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Animal Addict
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I knew in my heart something was wrong last night. But she seemed ok, ate her feed. This morning husband went down to take care of her, she seemed ok, just a little quiet. This afternoon he went back down and found her on her side, baaing softly. He scooped her up and rushed her into the house. She was still breathing, but shallowly. He held a piece of grain up to her to see if she would eat, she actually tried to, then snuggled in his arms and breathed her last. He actually tried CPR and brought her back for a minute, then she was gone. He said she is not bloated. In fact, she seemed skin and bones. But she had been eating the whole time.

At night she was kept in a pen with a blanket to snuggle on and straw. During the day I let her out and kept a close eye on her. There are no injuries.

I just don't even know what else to say.
 

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I am so very sorry. God Bless you and your husband during your time of sorrow. This is the hardest part of raising livestock. We have to remember the joys we shared and know that one day they will be waiting for us.
 

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Nubian dairy goat breeder
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becky i'm very sorry you lost her.
did you take her temperature last night as it was suggested? this could give a hint of what might have happened.
did you had her on cocci prevention after you got her? since the place she came from was not the cleanest and had goats with diarrhea, also her body condition of being very thin, let me think she had coccidiosis. not wanting to take a bottle at this age would be another clue.
babies don't need to have diarhea but still overpopulation of intestinal destroying parasite.
hopefully you will have more luck with your next kid.
 

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Animal Addict
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
No temp, and no diarrhea. I was having the vet come out to do a well-goat check on her and do a fecal. I figured she would have shown signs of coccidia, such as diarrhea, and so thought I had time for the vet to come out and do a fecal on her and ******. The head-in-the-corner thing from last night is listed as a symptom of enterotoxemia. The rapid decline and sudden death, too. Also I read that the coccidia contributes to enterotoxemia? She was getting all the hay she wanted, and a half a handful of kid feed, I mean literally 20 pieces or less since I was worried about her not getting nutrients and the feed supposedly had vitamins and such. I was going to get the vet to recommend or give me some kind of supplement. I just cannot believe this. Now ****** is going crazy out there alone and I am terrified to try this again. Now I have healthy seeming goats dropping dead :( :(.
 

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(((Becky))) Please don't give up. You are a wonderful caregiver that has just had a streak of bad luck. I lost 2 dogs and 2 goats last year, but we just have to keep on going. Gracie was lucky to have you for the short time you were together. She got to know what it was like to be cared for and loved! They don't always get that lucky.
 

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Animal Addict
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Need quick help...what do I do about ******>will Ivomec prevent coccidia in him (he is a year)
 

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Nubian dairy goat breeder
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becky a grown animal in good health should have enough immunity that cocci is not a problem. before you get another kid, read all about health and parasite prevention. ivermectin is antelmintic, means for stomach worms and such. for coccidia you would need a sulfa like albon. don't get your next goat from a filthy place, this causes only problems and for a beginner like you only pain.
 

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Ivomec is for worms. It depends on where you live whether or not that wormer owrks in your area. I use sulfa for cocci. Usually by a year of age, goats don't succumb to coddidia. Sorry you lost Gracie. If you live anywhere near Montana, I have some Nubian doelings available. They are spring kids and most are bred. Kathie
 

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Animal Addict
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
She was supposed to have had wormer :(. But I remember I think it was Vicki who said she never should have had the Ivermectin the woman gave her. I do recall you all mentioned sulfa. The only wormer I have available right now is the Ivomec, but rest assured I will have all that in place if I decide to try again. I thought if she didn't have diarrhea, we were ok. From what I have been reading (please please correct me if I'm wrong) the sulfa doesn't prevent them, but is used to treat them. IF I decide to try again, would it be ok to just give her the treatment dose no matter what? I am glad ****** is old enough to combat this as I understand it can be passed from goat to goat (if it is coccidia). We are planning to sterilize the entire stall but don't know what to use.

I have the other goat diseases permanently etched in my brain. I just didn't see this coming. I have written proof that she got the first shots on the day I got her. My gut still says this all goes back to her not being fed milk long enough and having enough of a defense? I am now in the market for a bottle fed goat, with all her shots, from a clean place and will have the vet come out IMMEDIATELY the next day. No more drop off, I will be going to the farm to see for myself. The saddest part is, they couldn't ask for better care. Clean fresh water, clean stall, loving mommy, awesome hay. It just wasn't enough.

So sad on so many levels.
 

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Cannon Farms
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understand Cocc, are not worms, so dewormers wont have any effect on them at all.
Corid, and Albon are about your only drugs, if you can feed enough of it, medicated feed can help, but theres allot of controversy about it.

Try this on, I lost two premies about a month ago, before that I had a kid live, but she was a devil of a job to keep alive and healthy and is stunted, then the little pygmy a friend gave me whos mother had died, I got healthy in just a few days doing the bottle thing and all, and then some how she got out of her crate and my husbands dog killed her, I came home to a half dead goat who took an hour to cross over.
Those are the bad times in keeping live stock, but you cant give up if you do, youll never have closure that you can do this. You have to be really careful of where you get your goats from, a breeder that doesnt show allot of concern or knowledge about their goats, is one to run from.
My goats are in allot of mud at the moment, things look less than ideal to some one who doesnt understand farm and mud, but I take great care in my goats. Read the whole book not just the cover, or the first chapter when chosing your next goat.
 

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Becky, I'm so sorry to hear about your goat.

I just wanted to throw something out there for consideration as it was a hard learned lesson for me.

I had what I though was a seemingly healthy 4 month old doeling die on me last year. She ate well, was active and showed no signs (that I saw) of anything wrong. She went down hill fast and we ended up losing her. The cause was determined to be an overload of tapeworms. I had suspected tapeworms about a month previous and wormed her - with Ivomec. The problem is that Ivomec will not help a goat with tapeworms. I thought I was doing the right thing but, due to my ingorance, we lost our little girl.

Maybe your vet can check if that is a possibile cause of Gracie's death.

Again, I'm sorry for your loss.
 

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Tapeworms are cosmetic, at best- they don't kill an animal. Ivermectin is not for kids under 6 months. It 'will' kill them.

Chances are cocci and entero- entero can kill in less than 12 hours with no outward signs whatsoever. I vaccinate ALL my kids at birth with C&D antitoxin and then at 1week of age I go ahead with Covexin8, then again in two weeks, and again in two weeks more, then four weeks.

Wth any animal that comes on my property, I always give them a vacciantion immeditely.

I so sorry for your loss.....try again as soon as you can.
 

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betsy h., thanks for the info.

Regarding the tapeworms, I guess it all depends on who you go to for information as to whether or not they can kill a goat. I've done quite a bit of reading up on them since we lost our goat and I have found quite a bit of conflicting information - some say yes they can, some say no they can't. I guess it's the same as with any other health issue with any other living thing out there - there will always be conflicting opinion. I have since learned to try and play it safe and strike a balance, not brushing things aside as harmless, but not micro managing every little thing either.

I had no idea about the effect of Ivermectin on kids that young and that very well might have had something to do with losing our doe. The learning curve sure is hard.
 

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I'm sorry that you lost her. That's tough to take but learn from it and don't give up. You obviously are willing to do whatever it takes to make them thrive. I've seen lots of stories of goats aren't so lucky.

There are 2 doses of sulfa for cocci. One is a preventative and the other is for treatment.

Clean is good enough. It is not possible to sterilize your barn unless you turn it into an operating room and don't let any animals inside. Focus on the basics and the rest will take care of itself.
 
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