gout blows

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by SRSLADE, May 15, 2004.

  1. SRSLADE

    SRSLADE Well-Known Member

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    Anyone have a cure for gout? I have it my big toe and can barely walk. I have had it in both toes but not for 5-6 years.How about somthing over the counter. Yea i know not beer.
     
  2. MelissaW

    MelissaW Well-Known Member

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    Eat as many cherries as you can get your hands on daily, preferably sour ones. Also, try a warm onion poultice on the affected area. And, as if you haven't suffered enough, cut out rich foods, seafood, and alchohol. Gout is such an awful problem, so sorry to hear you're suffering a bout of it. Take care and get well soon!
     

  3. Irish Pixie

    Irish Pixie Well-Known Member

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    My FIL has gout pretty bad at times. The antiinflammatory Bextra helps him a lot.

    Stacy in NY
     
  4. It is a metabolic disorder where too much Uric Acid is produced. In addition to Gouty Arthritis it also greatly increases the risk of kidney stones. Colchicine can help with the Arthrits, Polycitrate-K helps with the stones, and Allopurinal often helps with both
     
  5. heelpin

    heelpin Well-Known Member

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    Take a dose of baking soda for acute attacks. Gout is a result of an toxic acid condition at the cellular level, do a search "alkalize for health", get some ph tape and check you urine ph (it should be between 6.4-6.8), avoid all white food and meat, eat lots of leafy green foods, do a three day bowel cleanse (www.herbsfirst.com), do a kidney cleanse and a liver cleanse (www.curezone.com) eat more raw foods.

    Tom
     
  6. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas In Remembrance

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    While cherries and cherry juice seemed to help a little bit, you must stay away from organ meats and those luncheon meats containing them. Ibuporen in large doses did wonders for me.

    After a second round of gout in just a few weeks, with the pain spreading to a second toe joint, I made a doctors appointment to get a perscription to halt it. Allopurinol is worth the 16¢ per day cost. Allopurinol is also used sometimes to prevent kidney stones so I get an added bonus.

    My take on gout is that it is a form of arthritis. I'd rather treat is continually than to let it get worse and get to the point I can't walk at all without pain.
     
  7. Alice In TX/MO

    Alice In TX/MO More dharma, less drama. Supporter

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    Gout is uric acid crystals in the joint. Lots of water, cherry juice, look at your diet to eliminate foods that contain purine.

    According to the American Medical Association (AMA), purine-containing foods include:

    Beer, other alcoholic beverages.
    Anchovies, sardines in oil, fish roes, herring.
    Yeast.
    Organ meat (liver, kidneys, sweetbreads)
    Legumes (dried beans, peas)
    Meat extracts, consomme, gravies.
    Mushrooms, spinach, asparagus, cauliflower.
     
  8. Here is one of the latest sudies on Diet and Gout, the key is not to load your system with purines at one sitting/meal, so spread out your intake of purine rich foods:

    http://www.massgeneral.org/news/releases/031004gout.html

    Study clarifies impact of diet on the risk of gout

    Meat and seafood associated with greater risk, dairy products may be protective

    "BOSTON - March 10, 2004 - A new study has clarified the role of diet in the risk of developing gout - the most common form of inflammatory arthritis in men. By taking a comprehensive look at a broad range of dietary factors, the report confirms the suspicion that consumption of purine-rich meats and seafood increases the risk of gout. It also determines that purine-rich vegetables and overall protein intake do not raise risk. Appearing in the March 11 New England Journal of Medicine, the study also finds that intake of dairy products, particularly low-fat, may be protective against gout.

    "The association of purine-rich foods with gout had long been suspected but never proven," says Hyon Choi, MD, DrPH, of the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Rheumatology Unit, the paper's lead author. "Any contribution of protein intake to risk was uncertain, and this is the first evidence that dairy products can be strongly protective." The report is part of the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, which is based at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH).

    A painful condition affecting more than 5 million adults in the U.S., gout is caused by deposits of uric acid in connective tissue, often in joints of the feet or ankles, that lead to inflammatory arthritis. Symptoms include swelling, redness, stiffness, and severe pain. Although attacks of gout can subside in a few days, repeated attacks can cause permanent joint damage, and the disease often results in substantial disability, occupational limitations and frequent medical care. Treatment includes the pain-relieving drugs called NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatories) and for more serious outbreaks, corticosteroid drugs like prednisone. Most patients with gout eventually require long-term treatment with medications that lower blood uric acid levels.

    Because uric acid is formed by the breakdown of purines - compounds found in all human tissues and in many foods - gout patients have long been advised to avoid purine-rich foods. And since many animal products are rich in purines, avoidance of animal proteins has also been recommended. But the association of these foods with the risk of gout was never confirmed by prospective studies.

    Initiated in 1986, the Health Professionals Follow-up Study has gathered information regarding the relationship between dietary factors and several illnesses from more than 50,000 men employed in the health professions. Every two years participants complete questionnaires regarding their diseases and health-related topics like smoking and exercise, and every four years the questionnaires also collect comprehensive dietary information.

    The current investigation began with 47,000 men who did not report a history of gout at the study's outset. Participants who subsequently reported developing gout were surveyed to verify that they met standard criteria for the disorder, confirming a diagnosis of gout in 730 men by 1998. The researchers then analyzed dietary information that all study participants provided in 1986, 1990 and 1994 to determine how diet related to their risk for gout.

    The study results confirmed that consumption of meat - particularly beef, pork and lamb - significantly increases the risk of gout and that consumption of all types of seafood tended to carry an even higher risk. Notably, no increased risk was seen with consumption of purine-rich vegetables - which include peas, beans, mushrooms, cauliflower and spinach - or with overall protein intake. The study actually found a potential protective effect from vegetable and dairy proteins. The protective impact of dairy products had been suggested by an earlier study finding that a dairy-free diet could increase uric acid in the blood, and the current report confirmed that increased consumption of low-fat dairy products significantly reduced the risk of gout.

    Choi notes that this study's results are probably most relevant to individuals who have a history of gout or are at increased risk because of family history or other factors. "Dietary manipulation and behavioral modification to reduce risk of gout may have a much more substantial impact than currently believed. Reducing red meat consumption may be recommended because it also has been associated with such problems as colon cancer and diabetes. At the same time, healthy foods such as vegetables do not need to be restricted.

    Recommendations for seafood or dairy intake should be individualized with a physician or dietitian, taking into account their potential impact on any other health issues," he explains. Choi is an instructor in Medicine at Harvard Medical School.

    While this study examined only men, in whom gout is more common, the investigators strongly suspect that the results would also apply to women. Future studies to investigate whether reducing meat and seafood consumption or increasing low-fat dairy intake actually prevents outbreaks in gout patients could be valuable, the researchers say.

    Choi's co-authors include senior author Gary Curhan, MD, ScD, of HSPH and the Channing Laboratory at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), Karen Atkinson, MD, MPH, of the MGH Rheumatology Unit; and Elizabeth Karlson, MD, and Walter Willett, MD, DrPH, of BWH and HSPH. The study was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health and TAP Pharmaceuticals."
     
  9. evilbunny

    evilbunny Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the article and link. My Dad had gout and I have suspected I have had the symptoms. Interestingly the only time I had symptoms was after my doctor had put me on large doses of steroids for asthma. I had the same type of pain in my fingers, knees and big toes. It generally only hit one joint at a time but the pain lasted for months.

    I was always curious about diet and gout.

    Thanks
     
  10. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

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    Meds I'm on put me down with the Gout.Had it in my Toes and Elbows.The Doctor gave me some little Pills that made me sicker than a Dog but cleared it right up.

    big rockpile
     
  11. james dilley

    james dilley Well-Known Member Supporter

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    go to the drug store and get a box ofU.S.P. charcoal, not the kind to use on the grill it comes in tablets or capsules. ant take it that helps and is a non chemical approach to control.
     
  12. This is an old fashioned back woods remedy that is great for the urologist because it causes kidney stones. Baking Soda is Sodium Bicarb, Dark green leafy vegetables contain high amounts of oxalates. The high dose of bicarb mobilizes the calcium from the bones, (accelerating osteoporosis), the sodium forces the calcium into the urine. The oxalates from you dark greens complex with the calcium to form Wheddelite, the most common form of stone. The White part about food is vodoo too. You can see your herbalist now and the urologist next spring. or you could see a family Dr now and get a cheap prescription for allopurinol and whatever Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drug of choice .(last I checked, Alleve was the cheapest). Some herbal remedies have merit, some of our medicines are derived from them. But being herbal or natural doesn't mean it's safe. Cyanide and arsenic are naturally occurring substances, I doubt anyone will be wanting to take pills of them
    Medical Doctor


     
  13. Purine is the chemical that gets transformed into Uric acid.
    Medical Doctor


     
  14. heelpin

    heelpin Well-Known Member

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    I have twenty years of experience with herbs and natural methods after 5 years failure with "Medical Doctors" you can't tell me what works. I call you if I break my leg.
     
  15. heelpin

    heelpin Well-Known Member

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    http://www.medical-library.net/doctors/life_extension_clinic/

    http://www.tierversuchsgegner.org/RC-Dini/Raw-Courage-World/chapter-22.html

    http://www.cnn.com/2000/HEALTH/07/05/medical.errors/
     
  16. Karen pipher

    Karen pipher Member

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    I hear ya on the gout, nasty stuff to deal with. My Ma has it, I got it, and so do several members of my family. What I have found that works, is take the recommended doses of the following drugs everyday: Omega 3 fatty acids, it comes in a combination gel cap and contains flax, fish, and borage oils; baby asprin:eek:ne a day; calcium twice a day;taurine twice a day;vitamin e twice a day;zinc (unless you are allergic to it) once a day;magnesium (also, unless you are allergic to it), once a day.
    It is also a good thing not to eat much meat, or other heavy protiens such as in peanut butter, butter, etc.
    Milk, especially goat milk is good. Low fat milk or skim if cows milk. Watch the sugar intake, and cut the caffine, as they will both bother gout once it sets in.
    Of course, alcohol.
    We find that some greens will cause problems such as dark leafy veggies, and asparagus... :waa: of which we love them!! bummer......
    I also find that if I am having trouble form eating too much meat, that taking a nice hot bath helps to relieve the pain, with epsom salts in it.
    Good luck, hope this helps you or anyone, I know it is a pain (pun intended) to deal with, but you can overcome it, and live a more pain free life.
    Yes, gout is a crystalization in the joints. I have been in enough pain that I wanted to take a hammer to my toe joints and hands, but hey, can't get nuttin' done with casts on! :rolleyes:
    Ya, I miss the meat sometimes, I do still eat some, especially fish and chicken, but what I really miss is a big ole juicy steak. OH! I DO find that venison and goat meats don't seem to bother me as much tho. But, I still stay away from the organ meats. They are also high in cholesterol.
    Thanks for letting me put in my two cents worth, Karen
     
  17. desnri

    desnri Well-Known Member

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    You can get black cherry concentrate from the health food store. It makes a real tasty drink. Also, if I were you, I would take a vitamin B complex everyday.