Gourds?!

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Old Jack, Sep 17, 2004.

  1. Old Jack

    Old Jack Truth Seeker

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    " Huh!? Good gawd, Y'all what are they good for?" *

    *apologies to Edwin Starr

    But, seriously folks! I have ton's of them. The lady who lived here before had grown them and I guess I got stray seeds ALL over the garden and they grew.
    They are pear shaped and some are yellow on top and green striped on the bottom. Right now they're about 6 to 8 inches big.
    What do I do with 'em?

    Thanks----J
     
  2. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Are they still growing?

    I would LOVE to get my hands on some gourds...they're great for so many things. You can make pots out of them, lamps, etc. I want to try my hand at carving and decorating with gourds.

    I'm going to try my hand at growing gourds next year.
     

  3. anniew

    anniew keep it simple and honest Supporter

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    How about selling them, either at your own place, or through a
    market in town. Or dry them, make things next season out of the
    dried ones, and sell the "value-added" product.
    There are some neat books on gourd art which you could use for
    ideas.
    Ann
     
  4. Gayle in KY

    Gayle in KY Gadabout

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  5. Old Jack

    Old Jack Truth Seeker

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    Thanks to all for the ideas, I guess I'll let 'em go 'till the frost kills the vines to see how big they get. Then dry some.
    ---J
     
  6. Gayle in KY

    Gayle in KY Gadabout

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    If you're not familiar with gourds, this information might come in handy~

    Drying Gourds

    Unlike other garden vegetables, you won't eat your gourds. If you are going to put small gourds on display, you can do so right away. Healthy gourds will last for months.

    Many gourds are dried and later used ina variety of projects, especially for crafts. The drying process takes a long time. Here's how to dry them for later use:

    Drying and Curing:

    Gourds take a long time to dry. Small ones take at least a month. The long gourds for crafts can take six months or more. Here are the basics for drying them:

    Clean gourds with a solution of water and a disinfectant or bleach to kill any bacteria. Place gourds on a screen or a board, making sure that they do not touch each other. Store them in a cool, well ventilated area. Gently move them each day or two, and wipe off any moisture that is on them. Moisture is natural, as they are perspiring off the water content, which is about 90% of their weight. Fungus on them is not abnormal. They are okay unless they develop a soft spot. If a soft spot is found, discard it.

    Your gourds are dry when the seeds rattle inside. The gourd will be very lightweight- - and fragile.

    Once they are dry, you can make a wide range of crafts. They can be painted, shellaced, or left unfinished. As previously mentioned, Long gourds are used most frequently for crafts. Birdhouse gourds are also very common. You can make just about anything, including vases, flower pots, bowls, dishes, ladles. Simply use your imagination, or visit a craft show where a gourd crafter is showing his or her crafts.

    Did you know? Gourds were commonly used in ancient cultures around the world for a variety of tools and dishes.

    The above article and more information here~
    http://www.gardenersnet.com/vegetable/gourdsdry.htm