Got Sugar Maple Seeds??

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by cc-rider, Oct 25, 2004.

  1. cc-rider

    cc-rider Baroness of TisaWee Farm Supporter

    Messages:
    2,140
    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2003
    Location:
    flatlands of Ohio - sigh
    I believe it is the time of year that sugar maple "whirligigs" or "helicoptors" seeds are falling. Does anyone have any they'd like to share? Will gladly pay shipping and handling!!

    Chris in NW Ohio
     
  2. BCR

    BCR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,026
    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2002
    Location:
    WV
    Actually CC, when this came up a month or so ago I asked my botanist friend, as I only see them in the spring. That's what he confirmed. If there are any falling now they are the last clinging ones to the tree and most likely very dry. I usually have to clean out small maple trees from my gutters in May/June. I would try then.
     

  3. Mike in Ohio

    Mike in Ohio Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,143
    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2002
  4. vtfarma

    vtfarma Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    988
    Joined:
    May 6, 2003
    Location:
    VT
    BCR is right, our yard has all the seedlings from the spring infestation. I would be glad to send them to you in the spring... They plug the frog pond filter, and become weeds in the flower bed ... at least those in the yard do. The rest give us more wonderful maples!
     
  5. highlands

    highlands Walter Jeffries Staff Member Supporter

    Messages:
    9,741
    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2004
    Location:
    Mountains of Vermont, Zone 3
    We have tons - literally!.
    Are you planning to plant trees?
    They sprout very nicely.
    Or is this for play? :)
    Want to trade?
    Do you have acorns?

    Cheers,

    Walter Jeffries
    252 Riddle Pond Road
    West Topsham, VT 05086
     
  6. cc-rider

    cc-rider Baroness of TisaWee Farm Supporter

    Messages:
    2,140
    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2003
    Location:
    flatlands of Ohio - sigh
    Yep, was wanting to plant trees. Figured my grandchildren would get the benefit if I didn't! :)

    I don't have any acorns. Might have buckeyes, though! Actually, I'll take a walk-a-bout around campus and see if I can find any acorns. :)

    I had tons of them in the spring, too, but was under the impression that they weren't the "sugar" maple variety.... that sugar maples only seeded in the fall. Where would I find out for sure?

    Thanks for your help!

    Highlands.... if you want to send me some seeds, my address is:
    Chris Cooperrider
    253 Madison Ave.
    Findlay, OH 45840

    I'll see what I can do about the acorns! What about the chestnut-looking seed pods? (Maybe they ARE chestnuts....I'm terrible at things!) Want buckeyes if nothing else???

    CC
     
  7. highlands

    highlands Walter Jeffries Staff Member Supporter

    Messages:
    9,741
    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2004
    Location:
    Mountains of Vermont, Zone 3
    Chris,

    I'll put some seeds in the mail, along with a small sample of dirt incase you want to test the soil they have been growing in.

    Keep any browsing animals away from the seedlings and saplings as they love eating the maple trees, bark and fresh leaves.

    Acorns and Chestnuts would be great. I've not heard of buckeyes. What are they?

    Cheers,

    Walter Jeffries
    Sugar Mtn Farm
    252 Riddle Pond Road
    West Topsham, VT 05086
     
  8. cc-rider

    cc-rider Baroness of TisaWee Farm Supporter

    Messages:
    2,140
    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2003
    Location:
    flatlands of Ohio - sigh
    Buckeye:

    Botanical Name: The botanical name for the Buckeye is Aesculus which was taken by the Swedish botanist, Carl von Linne from "Aesculapius," the name of the mythological Greek god of medicine. The Ohio variety was named Aesculus glabra, by the German botanist Willdenow in 1809.

    Common Name: The common name "Buckeye" was derived from the Native Americans who noticed that the glossy, chestnut-brown seeds with the lighter circular "eye" looked very similar to the eye of a buck (male) deer.

    Description of the Ohio Buckeye Seed Nut: The seed nut is glossy and chestnut-brown in color. It is velvety smooth to the touch with a lighter circular "eye." It is contained in a spiny, two-inch hull and is set in five palmately compound, five inch long, decidusous leaflets. The leaf formation has been described as "praying hands" by poet Albrecht Duerer. The seeds and bark are slightly poisonous and bitter tasting. The properties can be eliminated by heating and leaching.

    Uses by Native Americans and Early Settlers: The Native Americans roasted, peeled and mashed the buckeye nut, which they called "Hetuck," into a nutritional meal. The early settlers found the buckeye wood to be lightweight (28 pounds per cubic foot as compared to 75 pounds per cubic foot for oak), to be readily split, and to be easily carved or whittled. Due to these qualities, the buckeye wood was used by settlers to make utensils. Thin planed strips of the wood were woven into a variety of hats and baskets. The buckeye wood has been found ideal in artificial limbs production due to its lightness and non-splitting characteristics.

    Medicinal Properties: Early travellers and explorers carried the rare and curious buckeye to the east with them and reported the Aesculus glabra's highly prized medicinal properties and talismanic attribute of wisdom. The extracts from the inner bark of the nut has been used in cerebro-spinal treatments. Some believe that the buckeye relieves rheumatism pain and provides good fortune when carried in the pockets of their garments or worn as an amulet around the neck. Instantly dubbed "buckeye" in frontier speech, the mysterious nut was used as a general cure-all for generations.

    Political Campaign Symbols: As a result of a political remark made by an opposition newspaper, a long cabin decorated with raccoon skins and a string of buckeyes became the symbol of General William Henry Harrison's presidential campaign.

    The following became his campaign song:

    "Oh where, tell me where was your buckeye cabin made?
    Twas built among the merry boys who wield the plough and spade,
    Where the log cabins stand, in the bonnie buckeye shade.

    Oh what, tell me what is to be your cabin's fate?
    We'll wheel it to the capital and place it there elate,
    for a token and a sign of the bonnie Buckeye state."

    As a result, citizens of Ohio became known as "Buckeyes." The buckeye tree was officialy adapted as the state tree on October 2, 1953.

    * * * *
    I think they are a pretty tree.... nicely flowered in the spring. The nuts fall in the fall and are annoying because you can't do anything with them. Or I don't anyway. When I was young, every youngster carried a buckeye in their pocket as a good luck charm. I don't think they do that anymore. :)