Homesteading Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi HomeSteaders! My name is Ash and I was born and raised in...that's correct... Massachusetts. My family and I are in the very infantile stages of being homestead bound. We are in the process of becoming 100% debt free and then we are moving up to join our relocated relatives in Rural Maine to begin the long and tough journey of self sufficency. The fast pace of Mass and the consumer culture is too much.

Our street was recently hit with a tornado and I thought to myself... I don't know how to grow food, hunt, can, basic sewing.. I know nothing of even basic survival. It's a long road, but I am counting down the days to get up there!

Any and all advice welcome.
><> Ash.
 

·
Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....?
Joined
·
78,913 Posts
Welcome to the asylum.
I have some distant relatives from Boston and Winthrop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,604 Posts
Hi HomeSteaders! My name is Ash and I was born and raised in...that's correct... Massachusetts. My family and I are in the very infantile stages of being homestead bound. We are in the process of becoming 100% debt free and then we are moving up to join our relocated relatives in Rural Maine to begin the long and tough journey of self sufficency. The fast pace of Mass and the consumer culture is too much.

Our street was recently hit with a tornado and I thought to myself... I don't know how to grow food, hunt, can, basic sewing.. I know nothing of even basic survival. It's a long road, but I am counting down the days to get up there!

Any and all advice welcome.
><> Ash.
Welcome. Every journey stars with a first step. Never forget that anything any of us may know, we learned at some point. You have already made the most critical step to learning which is coming to the realization that there are things you need to know that you don't. Happy learning!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,385 Posts
Welcome! Good for you! I know first hand how exciting this is for you. We did the same, we're in Maine now, we had lived northwest of Boston in a city of 110,000. Town where we are in now is 4600. Big difference. Once you are wrapped in nature you will feel differently and oh so good. When are you moving? Took us 3 years to plan and make the jump, good things come slow they say.
There is a lot of good information here and a lot of good people.
Hi HomeSteaders! My name is Ash and I was born and raised in...that's correct... Massachusetts. My family and I are in the very infantile stages of being homestead bound. We are in the process of becoming 100% debt free and then we are moving up to join our relocated relatives in Rural Maine to begin the long and tough journey of self sufficency. The fast pace of Mass and the consumer culture is too much.

Our street was recently hit with a tornado and I thought to myself... I don't know how to grow food, hunt, can, basic sewing.. I know nothing of even basic survival. It's a long road, but I am counting down the days to get up there!

Any and all advice welcome.
><> Ash.
.
Do you have a lot of family you are meeting up with? Will you be on the same property? I'm excited for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Welcome! Good for you! I know first hand how exciting this is for you. We did the same, we're in Maine now, we had lived northwest of Boston in a city of 110,000. Town where we are in now is 4600. Big difference. Once you are wrapped in nature you will feel differently and oh so good. When are you moving? Took us 3 years to plan and make the jump, good things come slow they say.
There is a lot of good information here and a lot of good people.

.
Do you have a lot of family you are meeting up with? Will you be on the same property? I'm excited for you.
Mother in law/father in law on 60 acres and sister in law/brother in law and nieces and nephews that are on 40 acres. Family compound! We are moving up in 18months-24months. It is a big secret right now because Im a hairdresser and how do you tell your loyal clients youre moving to the woods to learn self sufficiency and hoping to find a farm hand position?? And my mother will not handle it well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Congrats on your life change decision! It's been so wonderful getting out of the city and into the boonies.

I would suggest beginning to learn some of those skills now as opposed to after you move. You can grab produce from the farmers market and learn to at least water bath can. Start small and easy with some jams and jellies. Maybe take on some fermentation projects such as kombucha, pickles, yogurt, sourdough. But not all at once!
Sewing...start with either a needle and thread and sewing on buttons or with a machine. See if there's a sew and vac store where you can buy a quality old machine or you can opt for a new one at a still reasonable price. I have a 1971 Bernina with only one previous owner and a QS60 Necchi my mom gave me, but I prefer my Bernina. There's lots of tutorial videos on YouTube or see if the local fabric store offers classes. Those will be harder to come by after your move. Learn how to refashion clothes. I take dresses and skirts from the thrift store that may be too small for me, remove the zipper, put elastic in the waistband, sew it up where the zipper was and I've got a skirt for my daughter. Cute dress but don't line the top? Make it into a skirt. Most items of clothing I my closet didn't cost more than $5 per piece and most aren't new and several used to be my husband's clothes.

Quilting is good to learn...at least a basic 4 or 9 patch. When the clothes and sheets are too worn to use otherwise, cut them up and make a blanket. I make clothing from old sheets too. Worn flannel sheets make nice pajamas.

Look into other skills as far as crafting as well. I learned the basics of crocheting as a child but only in the last couple years...thanks to those YouTube tutorials...have I begun to really do anything with it. I've now made countless scarves of various styles, beanies, baby dresses, blankets of various sizes, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Congrats on your life change decision! It's been so wonderful getting out of the city and into the boonies.



I would suggest beginning to learn some of those skills now as opposed to after you move. You can grab produce from the farmers market and learn to at least water bath can. Start small and easy with some jams and jellies. Maybe take on some fermentation projects such as kombucha, pickles, yogurt, sourdough. But not all at once!
Sewing...start with either a needle and thread and sewing on buttons or with a machine. See if there's a sew and vac store where you can buy a quality old machine or you can opt for a new one at a still reasonable price. I have a 1971 Bernina with only one previous owner and a QS60 Necchi my mom gave me, but I prefer my Bernina. There's lots of tutorial videos on YouTube or see if the local fabric store offers classes. Those will be harder to come by after your move. Learn how to refashion clothes. I take dresses and skirts from the thrift store that may be too small for me, remove the zipper, put elastic in the waistband, sew it up where the zipper was and I've got a skirt for my daughter. Cute dress but don't line the top? Make it into a skirt. Most items of clothing I my closet didn't cost more than $5 per piece and most aren't new and several used to be my husband's clothes.

Quilting is good to learn...at least a basic 4 or 9 patch. When the clothes and sheets are too worn to use otherwise, cut them up and make a blanket. I make clothing from old sheets too. Worn flannel sheets make nice pajamas.

Look into other skills as far as crafting as well. I learned the basics of crocheting as a child but only in the last couple years...thanks to those YouTube tutorials...have I begun to really do anything with it. I've now made countless scarves of various styles, beanies, baby dresses, blankets of various sizes, etc.

Wow! Thank you so much for those suggestions. I definetly could benefit from learning some skills now before I'm out there! I have a sewing machine. Ill ask my cousin to give me a lesson!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,385 Posts
Mother in law/father in law on 60 acres and sister in law/brother in law and nieces and nephews that are on 40 acres. Family compound! We are moving up in 18months-24months. It is a big secret right now because Im a hairdresser and how do you tell your loyal clients youre moving to the woods to learn self sufficiency and hoping to find a farm hand position?? And my mother will not handle it well.

I agree with the poster that said you can learn where you are. Community Adult Ed courses offer things. The audobon society also had some neat workshops I took back when I was surviving the city. Also, I would say you don't tell your clients that you are moving, just maybe drop hints that you're dreaming of it. Then when it is the right time to tell them they won't be shocked and will probably be happy for you because you are going to pursue your dream. That is how it ended up working for me. We did have one friend though that didn't really believe us until one day he was over and we had started taking things off the walls and he was like wait, what's going on here? you really are going to move?!
As for your mom, you may be surprised, she could be happy for you too, and she can always visit, maybe she'll end up going too.
We were afraid to tell my MIL the plan and when we did she said "you better get that house listed now, spring is the best time to sell". We were shocked. But parents want their kids to be happy. Plus you're going to be near other family, not like you are moving to a remote corner of the world to be alone. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
You might want to see what's available through your state's university extension office as well. Do they have a Master Gardener or Master Food Preserver program where they offer classes? Here they've got a website with a calendar of classes offered where you can go learn specific things over an afternoon.

Since you already know a little about the land you're moving to, draw up a plan of what needs done pre-move, immediately after move and then make a general timeline of what your plans are. If you're able to visit the land before moving, try to get an idea of where you'll want that garden and how are you going to protect it from deer and rabbits and keep it watered. Learn about various gardening methods that may be good options to use for your climate. How much different is the weather between where you're at now and where you're moving? Snow and rain information? Are there outbuildings? What will they be used for and do you need to do any modifications for those uses? If there's woods, learn about forest management for things such as harvesting tree sap, food and firewood...and while you're at it water management! I suggest looking into various permaculture methods to learn what may work for your land....not all methods work for each set of conditions. We tried swales and found terracing works much better for our hillside since the woods are already in place. Can you tell what I did steadily for the 18 months before we bought our property...and have continued doing since we moved in almost 3 years ago?1
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top