Good Texas land and folks

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by walnutgrove, Nov 1, 2005.

  1. walnutgrove

    walnutgrove Well-Known Member

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    Smithville, TX
    I currently live in Austin and am looking for a good spot to buy land somewhere in Texas and settle down. Can anyone recommend a nice rural town where folks still give a little wave or a head nod as they pass by and land that can support a large garden, small orchard, and livestock :goodjob: ? Or am I dreaming?
     
  2. SteveD(TX)

    SteveD(TX) Well-Known Member

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    Go get a map of Texas. Close your eyes, and put your finger down on a spot. You'll find what you are looking for there.
     

  3. walnutgrove

    walnutgrove Well-Known Member

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    Smithville, TX
    I have looked at multiple areas and narrowed it down to a few select towns, just thought maybe there was one I had overlooked or not considered.
     
  4. mamajohnson

    mamajohnson Knitting Rocks! Supporter

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    I think Steve is right. Look for the climate your interested in, remember Texas has nearly as many as the U.S.!! You've got coastal land, hill country, deserts, the panhandle (where you get a bit more snow) and central texas which is just sorta the transition of desert/hills then there is northeast texas (love it here!!) where you have hills/more rain/still lots-a-hot and then southeast texas, same as above 'cept maybe a little wetter.... Geeze, there may even be some I've missed!
    Texas, what a great country! :goodjob:
     
  5. Lindafisk

    Lindafisk Well-Known Member

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    Just don't come to Princeton and you'll be fine....the price of water is crazy here!
     
  6. walnutgrove

    walnutgrove Well-Known Member

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    Smithville, TX
    I guess my primary thinking was to first find a town which would fit my family wants/ needs- small, safe, and full of friendly hardworking blue collar families, then try to find a homesite close to that town that would suit my ag needs. Just wondered if someone knew of a place where the whole town closes down to attend the high school football game, kids can ride their bikes around town without you having to worry about them getting kidnapped (cause you know that your neighbors keep an eye out for your kids, the way you do for theirs), and according to this town theft, vandalism, rape, robbery, and murders are things that only happen in the big city.
    Hence my question "Am I just dreaming?"
     
  7. walnutgrove

    walnutgrove Well-Known Member

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    Where is Princeton? Sounds familiar but cant place it.
     
  8. mwtslf23

    mwtslf23 Texan in Ohio

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    Central Ohio
    Howdy,

    You can buy my place here in Tolar, Texas. We are leaving and going to Missouri in the Mark Twain national forest. We are tired of the fire ants and heat. I have lived here in Texas for 32 years and it's time to go. We have 18.1 acres with 2 houses, really nice spot we use for our garden and there are turkey and deer here.

    Mike
     
  9. BearCreekFarm

    BearCreekFarm Well-Known Member

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    Minnesota
    uh, Mike, you don't work in sales by any chance, do you?
     
  10. dustyrose

    dustyrose Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    colorado
    i found this on a different site, sounds nice though :eek:


    50 BEAUTIFUL WOODED ACRES FOR SALE AT $3,000 PER ACRE 45 MINUTES NORTHEAST OF AUSTIN, TEXASIN LEE COUNTYCALL LAILJA AND LAMBERT WARE(813) 831-7496Lailja21@yahoo.com

    This rural parcel is north of Hwy 290 on PR3063 between Lexington and Butler. Neighbored by 55 wooded acres on east; rolling pasture on north; pasture and trees on west and woods on south of neighboring parcels. All sides are fenced except south. Creek runs through land from north to south with water flowing more during rainy season. Evergreens are gorgeous cedar trees that majestically stand out in winter months. Also found are pin oaks and post oaks.
     
  11. Rowdy

    Rowdy Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Jones Co, Texas
    I think it really should depend on if you need an outside income, and if so what type of work you do. There is lots of land for sale between Abilene and Ft Worth for cheaper prices than in the Hill Country, and it gets cheaper the closer to you get to Abilene, and beyond.

    Of course the pay scales for just about everything are low in the Abilene area.

    Of course west of Abilene the annual rainfall average dips below 20 inches a year. (Fort Worth gets about 30 inches a year, Abilene 23 inches, and El paso gets 8! ) Doesn't mean a garden or grazing is impossible on that cheap land east of el paso, just really hard, perhaps expensive.

    If your "day job" depends on a larger city Living North/NorthWest of Weatherford (Bridgeport /jacksboro area) and driving into Fort Worth might be possible, though personally that area has become too crowded for me. Fordy might be able to offer better ideas about living closer to DFW than me, since it has been five years since I've lived there.
    Again I come back to Abilene, since it is what I know. It is a large enough town (pop 103,000) to have almost anything you might want (including a good farmers market ) but there are lots of small towns 10-45 miles away that have the quailties that you mentioned in the OP. Hawley, the town nearest me has 646 people, and is ten miles away from my house, and about 20 miles from Abilene.

    I have six acres of this:
    [​IMG]
    And paid $1600 an acre for it. If I'd had cash I could have probably had it for $1000 an acre. To be fair, this is sandy land that the big farmers consider waste, but suits my designs of sustainable living. Most of the land in the Abilene/Big Country area is red clay, though there are also deep patches of sandy loam, or big rocks... just depends on where you look. I have six acres of oak, but in this area this is alot of open grassland thickets of mesquite/cedar and plenty of areas (usually south of I-20 with pecan trees as well.

    Anyway, just my slice of Texas,

    Rowdy
     
  12. Lindafisk

    Lindafisk Well-Known Member

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    We are north and east of Dallas a bit, down the road from McKinnney. Lake Lavon is within a mile or so...
     
  13. donsgal

    donsgal Nohoa Homestead

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    Well, speaking as a Missouri person myself, here you get your share of heat. We call it the old 99s that's 99 degress with 99 percent humidity. You can trade your fire ants for ticks and chiggars if you want, I guess. Every place has it's good and bad. That goes for Texas and Missouri too. But everybody needs a change now and then.

    donsgal
     
  14. Alice In TX/MO

    Alice In TX/MO More dharma, less drama. Supporter

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    We have a place on the coastal plain of Texas, and an old home that we are remodeling on acreage in the Ozarks of Missouri.

    There are advantages and disadvantages everywhere.

    If you want citrus trees in your yard, you need to look on the Gulf side of Highway 59. Then, you are in the target zone for hurricanes.

    If you want four seasons, you need to look north of Austin. I love the hills and rocks and trees of Southern Missouri, and the seasonal foliage makes me blissful. However, the chiggers and ticks are a drawback.

    Land is $2000 an acre and up in the area of Texas I am familiar with. It's about $1000 in the Ozarks.

    Jobs are a problem in the Ozarks, but taxes are low.

    Travel and hang out in a town you are interested in before you buy. My Texas place is in a community of people of central European heritage who are the most judgemental and clannish folks I ever met. They are one of the reasons I have another home to go to.
     
  15. Topaz Farm

    Topaz Farm Well-Known Member

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    Abilene, Texas
    I am in the same area as Rowdy, so can't add anything to what he already said.

    Got to say Good Morning to a neighbor....Morning Rowdy.
     
  16. Tio Ed

    Tio Ed Active Member

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    We live about an hour outside of Austin (East of Eden, as I like to call it) in Lee County near Giddings on Hwy. 290. Prior to moving into The Garage Mahal, we had a rental house nearby in Lexington while we finished construction.

    I do not currently, and haven't had for the last 3 years, a house key. I don't need one. Even living in Lexington a block from the high school and with everyone in our small town knowing I'm a musician and seeing me lug lots of computer and musical gear in and out of the house, I never locked the door and soon lost the front door key.

    Folks around here are friendly and hard-working and most folks will nod, wave or give you a raised index finger off the steering wheel when passing you. Sir and ma'am are still popular forms of address to your elders, neighbors will readily give you a hand if your livestock gets loose and we haven't been ostracized just because we didn't grow up here. I regularly see eagles, migrating birds, deer, wild hogs and more stars at night than a city person even knows exist. We've got more rainfall than the Hill Country and none of the ice storms and other severe weather which impacts the Dallas area. There's good soil out here for raising everything from corn to olives and it's possible to keep flowers growing and blooming outside until close to Thanksgiving. Good rural land is going for $3,500 to $4,000 an acre out here. The tax rate is low and, since I'm out in the county, we didn't have any building permits or inspections for anything except the septic tank. The local Ace Hardware in Giddings sells everything from septic tanks to cheap guitars, has a bridal registry and often sells bags of homegrown produce or homemade noodles at the counter.

    We're close enough to Austin for The Wife to commute in to her job at Dell and for me to rehearse and perform with Austin-based bands. I've got daily home delivery of the Austin paper, and between sat TV and sat broadband for the internet, we're as connected as we wanna be. That said, if the superflu ever strikes like a plague, we're isolated enough and we've got enough fish in the pond and veggies in the garden to keep ourselves safe and independent.

    Yeah, I kinda like where we live.

    Best regards,

    Tio Ed
    El Rey de Sweat Equity
     
  17. Calico Katie

    Calico Katie Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Go visit Shallowater - it's about 10 or 15 miles away from Lubbock.
     
  18. SteveD(TX)

    SteveD(TX) Well-Known Member

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    If you tell us the name of the towns, maybe we could get a better idea of what you are looking for. The climate, landscape, culture, and geography of this state are extremely vast. It's like saying you are looking for a small town in the "midwest". Tons to choose from.

    BTW - Princeton is a town about 30 miles or so northeast of Dallas. Rapidly growing and soon to be a suburb.
     
  19. Rowdy

    Rowdy Well-Known Member

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    Jones Co, Texas
    [derail]
    Well, good morning! If you don't mind me asking, whereabouts are ya'll at?

    [/derail]


    As for mineral rights... Yeah, there are ALOT of places around here that the Railroad sold off years and years ago that no longer have the mineral rights. Something to check on before buying.
     
  20. Ed in S. AL

    Ed in S. AL Well-Known Member

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    At the end of the road.
    From Austin, drive north on I-35. Just past Temple, you will see an exit in Eddy for Highway 7. It runs from I-35 back over to I-45. You take yourself a nice drive across Highway 7, and you will have found home and heaven. I would be there tomorrow if I could.