Good Or Bad :

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by dogo, Jul 19, 2006.

  1. dogo

    dogo Well-Known Member

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    My son works in a nursery and they had several bags of Lime and One bag of Ammonia/nitrate . They said it was no good to dispose of it . I told my son to bring it home, that I couldn't imagine lime going bad or the Soda/nitrate . What about you guys that are in the know . Question . Does it go bad, it might lose its full strength and then it might not . What do you guys think or know ?
     
  2. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

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    maybe it just got wet and clumpy. i would think it is ok to use.
     

  3. rwinsouthla

    rwinsouthla Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Lime will not go bad. It'll turn hard as woodpecker lips but won't lose effectiveness. Take an ounce of powder and an ounce of the bricks and dissolve it in water. You'll have the same amount of calcium and the same pH.
     
  4. woodspirit

    woodspirit Well-Known Member

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    Ditto on the lime. The only way that the ammonium mitrate will go bad is if it is opened. Once the bag is open, it will start losing nitrogen back to the atmosphere. If you can smell ammonia, that is the nitrogen evaporating. Still if you have opened bags of fertilizers or chemicals, the best way to dispose of them is by applying them at the rate suggested on the bag.
     
  5. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    That's not quite correct but close. Dry ammonium nitrate, 33-0-0, will be stable forever and not break down. Nitrates only dissolve in water. If it got wet, then there would be some release of nitrogen as long as it is wet. That process would stop when the material was dried again and the loss into the atmosphere would be negligible as compared to what would be soaked up by the paper bag or leached into the soil. There should be no ammonia smell since free anhydrous ammonia is NH3. When anhydrous bonds with soil or another inert material, it becomes ammonium which is NH4. I worked with that stuff for 11 years in pre-OSHA times. Amazing that I still have any lungs left!

    Martin
     
  6. Kee Wan

    Kee Wan Well-Known Member

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    To answer your question. I am not aware of any "reaction" that would do anythign to the two chemicals that you mentioned that would have any effect other than to weaken them. ( I am a chemist )

    As fertilizers etc....they may not be as effetive any longer - but I canot imagine that they have reacted wtih anything (that is not IMMEDIATLY AND CLEARLY EVIDENT) that would bring harm to your garden. The most likley reactions that would occur are those with the C02 or the H2O in the atmosphere - and both would only serve to weaken them.

    SO - use them as normal - but don't necessarily expect them to work.....

    If the bags are giving off funny odors, have turned strange colors or are excessivly hot (more than the ambient temperature would suggest) tehn maybe dont' use it.....but if it looks fine - adn smells fine....I'ts probably fine.
     
  7. dogo

    dogo Well-Known Member

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    Hey guys you all are tops ! As the saying goes nothing ventured nothing gained . These are a freebie so I don't think I have lost either way . Again thanks......
     
  8. starwalker

    starwalker Well-Known Member

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    :D