Good Book

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Redeemed98, Feb 15, 2005.

  1. Redeemed98

    Redeemed98 Well-Known Member

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    Can anyone recommend a good book about vegetable gardening. I am interested in starting a few small gardens around my place this year. We want to plant common veggies like tomatoes, bell peppers and such. We just need a good resource to look through and learn. Thanks ----
     
  2. whiterock

    whiterock Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Knowing where you are located would help. Some books are of no use to me due to location and others are very useful for the same reason.
    Ed
     

  3. Redeemed98

    Redeemed98 Well-Known Member

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    I am in Mississippi . Thanks
     
  4. whiterock

    whiterock Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Try www.gardenweb.com there are regional forums there.

    Howard Garrett has Texas Organic Vegetable Gardening and Texas Organic Gardening Book.

    Jeff Cox has Your Organic Garden

    Ogden has, I think, Gardening with Difficult Soils

    Eliot Coleman has good books primarily for the north but some info can be adapted.



    The New Seedstarter's Handbook
    Books on heirlooms such as The Edible Heirloom Garden, Heirloom Gardening, William Woys book on Heirloom Vegetable Gardening.

    Ck out Rodale Press, and used bookstores and libraries to find what may be useful to you in your area. The Texas books can easily be adapted to Mississippi as what does well in East Texas should do well in Most of Mississippi.

    Contact the Ag dept at nearby Universities for assisstance also.

    I have a bunch of books from college and teaching Ag. and I am always looking for others. Some OLD ag textbooks such as Producing Vegetable Crops andothers dating back to the late 1800's are also in my library. I look in antique stores, used book stores, garage and estate sales, just anywhere.

    I have some yearbooks of agriculture from the 1900'- 1920's that have some neat plates and info, some of which I wouldn't use on a bet!

    Hope I have helped some, once you start collecting it is hard to stop.

    Ed
     
  5. Wannabee

    Wannabee Foggy Dew Farms

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    Square Foot Gardining by Mel bartholomew is outstanding - especially if you want to garden in a smaller space. Be sure to check out his videos, too. I just bought them in Nov and they are excellent. I think I saw some listed on eBay last week. I bought the book and 3 videos on eBay for $12. Worth every penny! Great for beginners, too.

    Good luck!
     
  6. Shazza

    Shazza Well-Known Member Supporter

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    :) I love...The New Kitchen Garden ...by Anna Pavord, published by DK Living that's if you like Potager gardens....gorgeous gardens...lovely pics in book. The seasons are all opposite for here though...don't know about from England to you guys.
     
  7. kathrynlmv

    kathrynlmv Well-Known Member

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    The end-all books are "How to Grow Fruits and Vegetables the Organic Way" and "The Encyclopedia of Organic Gardening" both put out by Rodale....these are the basics. The Encyclopedia includes flowers and shrubs, but has less information per plant than "how to grow". Kathrynlmv
     
  8. Pat

    Pat Well-Known Member

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    Honestly, I'd suggest working with someone that has a long established garden, and use the books listed as reference and ideas books for your garden. Besides the books listed, I really enjoyed Gene Logsdon's The Contrary Farmer's Invitation to Gardening, and Luise Riotte's Carrots Love Tomatoes, and her Roses Love Garlic.

    I remember very well telling (well to be honest, probably bragging) my Grandmother my gardening techniques (combining ideas from Square Foot Gardening by Mel Bartholomew with other ideas ((the books I have listed now weren't written then)) I had gotten from magazines and other books), then she showed me a article my Aunt (not her daughter) had written in a local paper about her gardening techniques. Surprise surprise the only thing different was the wide row (modified from Square Foot Gardening) technique that I used (and continue to use). (Meaning, in reality I learned how to garden by helping in my Aunt's garden, my Grandmother's garden and my Uncle's garden when I was small - all three used very similar techniques ((the Uncle and Aunt were brother and sister, but not related to the Grandmother.)))

    If you volunteer with a local gardener (with long established garden) you will learn what plants do well in your area, and the techniques that work in your area. Then you can modify their way with the ideas (techniques and plants) you get from the various books.

    For me, it's much better to get my fingers dirty (learn by doing) than to read a book about it. Once I know how, then you should be able to tell if the ideas described will work in my area or not. You are also able to modify them to something that will work in your area that way also.

    Pat
     
  9. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

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    Hey Pat, sounds like you are using a similar method to what I am. I am using the square foot method (4 x 16 beds) and companion planting. I also mulch alot.

    I also enjoyed "How to grow more vegetables (than you ever though possible, on less land than you can imagine)"

    BTW, Pat, I still haven't talked to my grandma about the trees. I will call her tonight.
     
  10. Pat

    Pat Well-Known Member

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    My rows here are about 4 by 60. Why break off at 16 (or 8 like Bartholomew suggests) As long as you can reach in from the 2 sides to work them, they can be as long as you want. The sixty was determined by the garden size (it was already fenced off).

    I also use the companion planting (from the Roses Love Garlic and Carrots Love Tomatoes), and the "target" planting (I tried a couple of Mulberry trees last year - but got the "too" cheap ones that were too small or something else anyway they didn't grow, so I'm going to try them again, but better quality from better nurseries). One of the them said birds like Mulberries better than Strawberries and / or Cherries.

    I've also tried (and it really worked out) using 4 legged tillers (Pigs). Actually I've grown a lot since I was talking to my Grandmother, and now there are more things that I do that they didn't teach me. The real bottom line for me in gardening is from them though. Healthy soil makes healthy plants. Insects and diseases seem to like plants that aren't healthy. The plants seem to grow faster, bigger and have more fruit in healthy soil. I do believe in making my soil healthy (not buying "top soil" and making the raised bed) by adding all the compost I can make. Planting beans and peas for a cover crop in late summer (for the natural nitrogen addition for the next year's garden), all our coffee grounds go straight to the garden (instead of going there through the compost pile, in general succession planting (so the garden plot doesn't go idle ((and weedy)) any time except winter). (all learned from them when I was little working in their gardens)

    Pat