golf carts

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by travis91, Dec 23, 2005.

  1. travis91

    travis91 Formerly 4animals.

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    hi were moving to Geneva, Alabama in late jan. early feb. and i was thinking about getting a modifed gas golf cart. you know one with aftermaket suspention and atv wheels and tires i am going to buy one already built or buy a stock one and buy all the parts and me and my dad(very mechaniclay inclined) put it together. do any of you have these? if so how do you like it? what do you like? what dont you like?how does it handle mud?steep inclines(up or down)? how fast does it go? who makes yours? if you could go back in time would you buy it agiain? if you could change something(s) what would they be? thanks for all you input i just want to buy the right thing. if you know what i mean!


    [p.s this is also on shop talk]
     
  2. idontno

    idontno Well-Known Member

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    Here is a cool site...http://server1.buggiesunlimited.com/phpBB2/.. that has every answer you will ever have...Go down aways and they have a forum on off road carts..hope this helps.... merry xmas....idontno :walk:
     

  3. Fire-Man

    Fire-Man Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Several of my neighbors have one and one neighbors daughter has one (all Gas)and she lives 5 miles away-------They love them--------Speed probably between 20 and 30, they drive them all Sunday afternoon for fun and usually stay in a 10 mile radius, but I am sure they are trying to stay in check with the law. They go through sand, some mud and climb inclines ok, but they are not 4 wheeler's and are not intended for Mud Boggin. If you make a 4 Wheeler out of one----be prepared to work on it alot. I have a regular electric golf cart and it will Pull better than my 4 wheeler on hard dirt, but will not run as fast or go through mud-----Its not a 4 wheeler. Good Luck. Randy
     
  4. oldmanriver

    oldmanriver Well-Known Member

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    Love mine use it more than anything on the farm.......
     
  5. Wolf mom

    Wolf mom Well-Known Member

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    Good question.
    I was wondering which would be best - an electric or gas golf cart or a 4 wheeler. Which would pull a cart better, got through mud..etc. Best all around farm use, least maintenance are two very important considerations. Think I'll have to get one next summer to save wear & tear on the truck.
     
  6. travis91

    travis91 Formerly 4animals.

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    check out http://www.lincolngolf.com/ the tips and info section is very helpfull i going gas!
     
  7. Mel-

    Mel- Well-Known Member

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    are these legal to run on the road? I have a couple of neighbors with them and one is always driving it on the road though I don't think he goes all the way to town with it (4 miles) . I think he just drives around our *neighborhood* (rural area, roads are all exactly 1/2 mile or 1 mile apart).
     
  8. Quint

    Quint Well-Known Member

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    I've seen the "off road" golf carts but I worry about the durability. I just don't they'd cut it around here. I'm looking into an electric one though for the sake of experimentation.

    A nice middle ground are the new Utility vehicles like the Arctic Cat Prowler, Yamaha Rhino, Kawasaki Mule, John Deere Gator etc. These are sort of an half golf cart half atv type of machine. I've driven Yamaha Rhino myself and can attest to it's prowess. A wonderful machine. It has a locking front differential which makes it as sure footed as a mountain goat and virtually unstoppable off road. An excellent machine. The Kawasaki Mule is more utility oriented but the Rhino is much more capable and comfortable. The Mule can haul a little more but the Rhino can haul it faster and more comfortably. I could make two trips with the Rhino from one side of the farm to the other in the time that I could make one with the Mule. The Mule rode rough and sounded like a junk wagon rolling through the woods. The Rhino was just a better all around worker though the Mule LOOKED to be the better worker in the beginning.

    For me an ATV is perfect. A big bore 4x4 ATV to be specific. An ATV with a locking front differential is virtually unstoppable by anything but the most insanely rugged terrain. If they are well taken care of they will last a very long time. I prefer the saddle type position as it is easier on the back (for me anyway) than the more conventional seating position of a golf cart or utility vehicle. Another thing I like is the versatility. If I don't need to haul a bunch of stuff I have the racks which can hold a variety of bags, boxes and buckets. This way the machine is light and maneuverable. When I need to haul more I can quickly hook up a small or large trailer depending on the job at hand. Most of the time a tool box or a bucket or two is all I need with me for chores. The big bore ATVs will haul me and a fully loaded ATV trailer with no problem and when it gets muddy the locking front differential is worth it's weight in gold. It is also nice to strip off all of the farm implements and boxes, load it in the back of the truck and head out for a nice trail ride. There are some very nice trails around the country with some wonderful scenery. A great activity for the family. I'm planning a trip out to Utah next year to ride the Paiute trail. Suppose to be some very scenic country with hundreds of miles (actually a couple of thousand) of trails open to the public.
     
  9. travis91

    travis91 Formerly 4animals.

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    hey check out that link that i put up above. and read every artikle attatched to the links on the tips and info section the gas carts are built stronger.
     
  10. Wolf mom

    Wolf mom Well-Known Member

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    What about using a riding lawn mower with the mower atachment taken off? maybe not such a good idea except on level ground? I have a John Deer with a little dump tralier, but I have to get it fixed (the Deer). Wondering if it's worth it to haul hay, cinders, etc throught mud & snow.

    Excellent site info.
     
  11. SteveD(TX)

    SteveD(TX) Well-Known Member

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    I have an EZ-Go electric cart. It's strictly stock, but it handles chores, hills, and rough terrain pretty well. Putting on larger tires will cut down on the top end speed; right now that's about 12-13 MPH. Unless you have the need for speed, an electric cart will do just about anything you ask it to. A gas cart might be a little better for lots of mud, fast hill-climbing, huge tires, etc.. But the elec. cart I think tends to be more reliable, cheaper to run, quiet, and better for my situation. Lots of people mount a lift kit with huge tires on these as well.