Goats on the loose

Discussion in 'Goats' started by threesillygoats, Aug 15, 2005.

  1. threesillygoats

    threesillygoats New Member

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    Hi everybody! I'm new to goating and this forum so I first want to say hello to all of you. Anyway, a few months ago I purchased 3 partially boer goats. Now I have 2 five week old kids. Right at first the goats were not very content inside their fence. (I have some kind of electric horse fence and they will come out even with it hot.) They would come out at night and terrorise our garden and landscaping. Then they seemed to become very content. They didn't break out for a couple of weeks, but now they are coming out just like before. And its not like they are running out of food. They have about 4.5 acres of lush green pasture. Any ideas how I can keep them in their pasture without the expence of new fencing? And they know better that to come out to. Every time you walk out they will run back to their pasture. What do you think makes the grass look greener on the other side for them?
     
  2. mary,tx

    mary,tx Well-Known Member Supporter

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    It's been my experience that once the goats find the garden (or fruit trees, etc.), they'll go back there every time they think about it if they can, no matter how much trouble it is, or how green it is on their side. I doubt you will keep them in without putting up some field fencing.
    mary
     

  3. mamasaanan

    mamasaanan Well-Known Member

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    Because goats look at something green and growing and think:

    "Hey, there's something I haven't eaten yet!".

    Goats are also very intelligent and are skilled escape artists. Doesn't take one very long to figure out how to get through an electric fence, especially the smaller kids, who can slither under one like they're doing the limbo. I have a sweet little wether named 'Houdini' for this very reason.

    Goats also like to play. I know this sounds silly but goats need 'toys'. We have several large wooden cable spools, goat ramps, and big beach balls to keep ours amused. Ok I'll admit it, they're spoiled.

    Instead of trying to make an escape proof pen, try fencing the garden with net wire. You'll be amazed at how far a goat can stretch their lips and tounge to get at a plant.
     
  4. threesillygoats

    threesillygoats New Member

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    Ok thanks for your imputs but I have another problem. Whenever the goats are out of their pen and I go out all the goats will run back except one. Whenever I walk up to her she will rear up and try to buck me. She also hangs out her tongue and makes a very strange noise. It kinda sounds like shes very angry. When I grab her collar and lead her to the fence she refuses to go into her pasture. I have tried very mild discipline to try to get her inside but she won't go. I am tired of being the madador in a goat fight. What should I do? She used to be as tame as a cat.
     
  5. trnubian

    trnubian Twin-Reflection Nubians

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    Your doe is trying to be dominant over you. That is what that sound means. Don't let her be. Push her around like another dominant goat would do. push her around on her shoulders rump and neck. If she rears uppush her over very firmly so that she feels like she is going to fall but dosen't. Keep doing it and she will figure out that she is not dominant. your doe could also be in heat.

    A lush green pasture is not what goats eat. They are browsers and eat trees, and stemmy plants, not grass. Sheep eat grass, cows eat grass. They are probably hungry. Offer them some good grass mixed or alfalfa hay twice a day before and after they are put out to "graze". They will also need some type of grain, and sweet feed made for horses will work well if they are just pets at your house and you aren't raising them for a profit. The does with kids on them will definately need some grain and hay.

    Electric fence is hard to keep goats in with. Get some cattle pannels, or even tightly stretched woven wire will work. The reason your goats are probably getting out is because they are hungry and of course curious.

    Good Luck!
     
  6. Eveningstar

    Eveningstar Active Member

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    I would dare say the one that likes to fight with you is a buck. Some are mild mannered while others would just as soon do you in. They are most likely to be nastier during breeding season. There is a way to control a buck by grabbing his ear in a certain way, but I have never seen anyone do it nor have I had the need to try it. It has to do with the natural way a mother doe reprimands her kids. Goats don't really like their ears played with so there may be something to this. A friend of mine told me about it and said it worked for him. Any time his buck acted up, he would grab only the ear very firmly (almost squeezing it) close to the head and could actually make the buck lie down. He held just the ear for a couple of minutes and then released the goat. He said he did this about three times and the buck no longer gives him a problem. It may be worth a try. If you have luck with that, let me know! As from what I understand, this is not a wressling match type of thing but rather a method of control. Perhaps showing the goat who is dominant.
    The best kind of fencing for goats that I have tried is welded wire fence or field fence. The openings are 2"x4" so they can't get their heads through it. For bucks, 6' high fences are best to prevent accidental breeding. If they are pets and you just want to keep them out of the garden, then fence the garden with the same 6' fence. Be careful and buy WELDED wire fence and not WOVEN wire as goats find it fun to smash the woven fences.