Goats/kids and collars...

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Wingdo, Nov 27, 2006.

  1. Wingdo

    Wingdo Well-Known Member Supporter

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    As a young man in the kills of Kentucky, we always kept a few goats around to help with the t-breds... milk, companionship, and the like. These goats were always taught to lead at an early age, but then were more or less turned loose with the cattle until needed, so they never wore collars. However, once they were called upon to help with other issues, they were fitted with collars and wore them until they passed away. We never lost a goat to hanging itself, but then they were not turned out in wooded pastures with them.

    How do your goats fair with a collar on year round... does it wear the hair off their necks, irritate their skin, get caught on things, etc.?

    Wing
     
  2. HappyFarmer

    HappyFarmer Well-Known Member

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    We have one goat who wears a nylon dog collar year round cause you can't catch her. She has never gotten caught on anything. There is but a few things she could get caught on, though. It is fairly loose, and no marks or chaffings.

    They sell break away collars with velcro through on eof the catalogs (jeffers or caprine supply mabe??). They might be better for brush & woods.
    HF
     

  3. steff bugielski

    steff bugielski Well-Known Member

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    I make my own with nylon web and fastex plastic buckles. The plastic buckle breaks before they get into trouble. Mine wear collars .
    Steff
     
  4. Caprice Acres

    Caprice Acres AKA "mygoat" Staff Member Supporter

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    All of my goats used to wear collars. Then they started wearing away the hair at the top and bottom of the necks. If I were to have them wear collars again, I would have them wear the plastic chain that many people love. I found the plastic chain at a local hardware store for .70 per foot, and you can get the connectors from hoegger or caprine supply, which break if too much stress is put on them but hold tight enough to lead a goat (unless the goat is an adult and not leash trained) I would however, not leave collars on kid goats untill they are older. At such a young age, if they got hung up on something, they aren't heavy/strong enough to break the connector. You can teach them to lead with regular dog collars, then when they're old enough, switch to the plastic collars.
     
  5. AllWolf

    AllWolf We love all our animals

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    I have a goat that wears the break away collars. I do not trust like dog collars. If have collars on a goat be sure to watch to see if it is getting to tight around neck line.

    Good Luck.
     
  6. AnnaS

    AnnaS Well-Known Member

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    My baby kids wear the velcro collars until they get tattooed; by the time they are breeding age they have plastic breakaway chain collars with id tags. I have lost a few collars but no goats (knock on wood)
     
  7. moonspinner

    moonspinner Well-Known Member

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    All mine wear nylon collars - either buckle or snap -loose enough for comfort, tight enough so they can't catch on anything. If you ever have a goat get loose and playing catch me if you can, you want a collar on. Never have had a problem.
     
  8. DocM

    DocM Well-Known Member

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    All my does wear collars, the nylon dog type with the plastic buckles. In a pinch, I do believe the buckle would break before the goat was in real trouble. I buy them in bulk from valley vet, so they aren't the cheapo kind, they're pretty heavy duty. They aren't in an area where they would catch them on something, they're all dehorned so no chance of hooking a horn onto a collar. There's nothing more annoying than a goat that doesn't want to be caught with nothing on them to hang onto when they run past. My wethers and bucks are in a pasture with a lot of branches and other stuff, plus a couple of them have horns. They do wear collars but for them, I buy the cheap dollar store nylon ones with the buckles so cheap they break with more than a little pull. So far, nobody has been caught or choked, but I keep a close eye on my goats whenever they're out. I have collars on my kids when they are just a few days old, and pull them around (stiff legged sometimes) until they get the idea. I really dislike yanking a goat around by the collar, I want them to walk quietly, very important in the show ring too. I have one big (170 lbs) alpine doe, if she doesn't want to go, she doesn't, and she outweighs me - I use a sheep halter on her, loop the lead around her rear. Really fun getting her in the ring, usually takes two people.
     
  9. Nancy_in_GA

    Nancy_in_GA Well-Known Member

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    We tried the nylon chains on two goats that are too much trouble to catch, but the other goats would just chew them off the first day. I know that's what happened, because you could see the teeth marks all over them when we found the collars.

    So we went with the nylon collars and plastic buckles. We have a lot of fallen trees on our property, so I don't like it much, but they may be in more danger from me (trying to catch them without collars :) ). We keep them as loose as possible, so no problem with hair loss.

    Nancy
     
  10. DocM

    DocM Well-Known Member

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    That's my experience with plastic chain. 24 hrs after outfitting everyone with a nice colorful chain, they were laying all over the pen, chewed off. Plus, when I'd grab one, the connector would snap right off.
     
  11. ~PrairieGirl~

    ~PrairieGirl~ Well-Known Member

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    I keep nylon dog collars on mine. They are loose enough that they can back out of them if they have to.Nobody has gotten into trouble yet. Now the hay net is another story, but they don't have that anymore. If they are "freindly" I wouldn't worry about it as much as if they were wild. When my goats got into they hay net they would just be in there waiting for me to untangle them , not thrashing around.
     
  12. dosthouhavemilk

    dosthouhavemilk Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Dog collars from DG or FD with the plastic snaps here. They break if there is any trouble. I've had does come back from browsing the 80 acres collarless. I have one doe I just cannot keep a collar on at all. Luckily she was bottle raised and it isn't an issue. They tend to drop the collars in the pen as opposed to out in the field (though dad has picked up a few when going after the cow herd).
    The dollar collars from Big Lots and the like were just too cheap and didn't hang together at all.

    I am noticing hair loss on some goats but that is more from our hay feeding system (new set up this fall) than anything else.
    Collars make a world of difference in catching the goats and I tame them down by clipping them for feeding when they are heavy bred.