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Last week, one of our goats started showing signs of worms (sluggish, heavy eyes, pale gums, diarrhea). He was roughly 6 weeks old & still nursing. We wormed him immediately but unfortunately he passed. The next day we wormed all of our goats just to be safe. We use safeguard for goats. Today one that wasn’t even showing signs of worms was found dead.... She had normal poop, she was lively, she was eating. My father in law did an autopsy and she was full of worms also. Any ideas or suggestions. Is this wormer ineffective or should we be doing multiple doses? We are new to goats.
 

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Safeguard is only effective on tapeworms. Most worms are immune.

Did you start treating for coccidia at three weeks?

Links in my next post.

Most of us get goats and learn the hard way that they are NOT an easy farm animal to care for.
This is why ive wanted goats since we got our property but havent gone through. I can handle a dead chicken once in awhile. I think id be a mess over a goat.

Lacey, im sorry this is happening to your livestock. I dont have advice just best wishes you find a solution before you lose More.
 

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Alice gave very good links.
I'm sorry you're going through this - the loss of a goat can be heart wrenching, but as Alice says - they are not an easy animal to keep and there is a pretty big learning curve. Good goat vets and mentors can be invaluable. The group of experienced goat folks here have helped me tremendously -- come back often, ask questions.

I'll add -- to control parasites (IMO) requires a multi-pronged approach -
Fecal testing so you know exactly what parasite(s) you're fighting. I use MidAmerica Ag Research. Their tests will also include results for coccid.
http://midamericaagresearch.net/instructions.php
Coccid treatment in young goats - and in my case I have one doe that periodically shows up with coccid, even as an adult.
Nutrition - good quality hay, goat specific minerals, and we include Thorvin kelp.
Treatment knowledge - for example if you use Corid to treat Coccid, you need to know it's a thiamine inhibitor.
Parasite lifecycles -- parasites shed into pasture can be picked up and reinfect a healthy goat. Infected bedding can be problematic.

You can get additional education at WormX by the ACSRPC - American Consortium for Small Ruminant Parasite Control. My vet is a member of the ACSR - and years ago suggested using combination dewormers (second link below to the article) and it helped.

https://www.wormx.info/dewormers
https://www.wormx.info/combinations
 
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