Goat Question

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Dr.Who, Dec 16, 2005.

  1. Dr.Who

    Dr.Who Well-Known Member

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    When is the Umbilical Stump supposed to fall off of a baby goat? My Nubian does have become pregnant and this is my first time having pregnant goats. I am trying to learn everything that I need to know about the birthing and aftermath. But I haven't read anywhere about when the cord stump falls off.
    Dr.Who
     
  2. Rachel K.

    Rachel K. Well-Known Member

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    It should fall off within days after being born.
     

  3. Shazza

    Shazza Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Dont forget to spray with "True Blue" Antiseptic spray or dip in Iodine to avoid in infection seeing how they spend so much time on their tummies in the straw. Also dont let it be too long that it drags along the ground when they walk. It'll dry and shrivel within days and then fall/break off.
     
  4. Teacupliz

    Teacupliz Well-Known Member

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    don't exspect it to fall off in a few days. We have had hundreds of baby goats. Some may fall off in a day other weeks, yet some months. Do dip all cords in Iodine as soon as they are born to prevent naval ill.

    Liz
    Teacup Farm
     
  5. crazygoatgirl

    crazygoatgirl Well-Known Member

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    I always cut cord of newborns with a sharp pair of scissors and then spray with iodine to prevent navel ill.
     
  6. mpillow

    mpillow Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Ditto for what TeacupLiz said....the weather can affect drying time, as well as barn conditions....I use a spray bottle on my iodine....I use the 7% stuff.
     
  7. Misty

    Misty Misty Gonzales

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    I don't spay all of them and have never had a problem. We do our baby pigs...Usually by the time the goats are born and we know about it, it is too late, they have already been exposed anyway.
     
  8. Laura Workman

    Laura Workman (formerly Laura Jensen) Supporter

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    I've sold 8-week-old kids with umbilical cords still on. After they're dried, usually a day or two after birth, I usually trim them to an inch or two so they don't get damaged. I kid in freshly cleaned stalls and don't spray or dip. Maybe I've been lucky, but I've never had a problem. By the way, freshly cleaned means I feel fine about laying down near the goat to wait for the moment, so the stall is REALLY clean.
     
  9. goatkid

    goatkid Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I always dip the babies' cords in 7% iodine as soon as I discover them or as soon as a new one is cleaned off. It just isn't worth risking navel ill. Even if the birthing area is freshly strawed, the goats still potty in it, including the new babies.
     
  10. westbrook

    westbrook In Remembrance

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    rather then cut the cord, it is better to take your thumb nail and finger nail and use them to cut the cord (if the cord needs to be cut) this mimmicks the tearing the cord normally gets and allows it to clot naturally.

    Always 7% iodine.

    The cord will fall off when it is ready.
     
  11. Dr.Who

    Dr.Who Well-Known Member

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    Is it best to try and let the mama goat handle it all herself or is it best to assist her with it? A friend of mine told me he has had Boers that have given birth and not even clean the baby off at all. Not even let the baby take any milk. Is that common with goats. Sorry for the silly questions. I am a little nervous about the birthing part and just want to make sure everything turns out ok.
     
  12. crazygoatgirl

    crazygoatgirl Well-Known Member

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    Some first time mom's are just oblivious as to what they should do. If it is a does first time I would try to be present so you know that the kids have nursed and the baby/babies are being cared for. Yes there are does that will lay down, have a kid and get up and walk off....the majority of the time it is first time mothers. If you do have to assist just be sure to not take the kid away from the mom..unless she is trying to beat it up. Let them bond so the baby doesn't bond to you.
     
  13. westbrook

    westbrook In Remembrance

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    Be there and observe. Have clean towels ready to help dry the kids off, and of course you will be dipping cords. It may take the kid an hour to nurse.. remember the doe most likely has another kid on the way out and other then licking the first one or second one.. nursing is the last thing on her mind. The licking and eating the placenta promotes her hormones so don't try to stop her. She may or may not eat them all or none of them. I usually let the dogs have them the next day.

    I personally have kidding pens that are small 6' wide by 6' (having them in a small pen helps them bond) with water raised high enough a kid can't get in it, and a place to put the feed where the kid can nibble... even it doesn't know what to do quite yet. I pull the does out of the pasture about a week before and put them in the pens.
     
  14. Starsmom

    Starsmom Well-Known Member

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    after dipping in iodine, I tie it off with fishline. I don't know if it really helps or not, but it makes me feel better.